1908 in Italy

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Years: 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911

See also: 1907 in Italy, other events of 1908, 1909 in Italy.


Events from the year 1908 in Italy.

Kingdom of Italy[edit]

Events[edit]

Corpses of victims of the earthquake in Messina, December 1908

Italian nationalism flourishes after 1908 in an uncertain and unstable international environment such as the Bosnian crisis and the First Moroccan Crisis in which colonial rivalry became intense and when alliances, such as the Triple Alliance to which Italy belonged and the Triple Entente that courted the Italians, became more fluid.[1] Italy expected compensations in the Italia Irredenta's territories ruled by Austria-Hungary in exchange for its recognition of the annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina, as it was agreed upon in the Triple Alliance treaties with Austria-Hungary.

  • April 5 – The Italian Parliament enacts a basic law to unite all of the parts of southern Somalia into an area called Somalia Italiana.
  • October 29 – The Italian business machine manufacturer Olivetti is founded in Ivrea, producing typewriters.
  • December 27 – Italian newsstands saw the first issue of Il Corriere dei Piccoli, the first mainstream publication primarily dedicated to comics. The first issue introduced readers to the adventures of Bilbolbul, a little black kid drawn by Attilio Mussino that is considered the first Italian comic character.
  • December 28 – A 7.1 magnitude earthquake hits in Sicily and Calabria, southern Italy. The cities of Messina and Reggio Calabria were almost completely destroyed and between 75,000 and 200,000 lives were lost. Moments after the earthquake, a 12-meter (39-foot) tsunami struck nearby coasts, causing even more devastation.

Sports[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clark, Modern Italy: 1871 to the present, p. 184