1909 Army Cadets football team

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1909 Army Cadets football
Conference Independent
1909 record 3–2
Head coach Harry Nelly (2nd season)
Home stadium The Plain
Seasons
← 1908
1910 →
1909 IAAUS independents football records
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Washington         7 0 0
Notre Dame         7 0 1
Penn State         5 0 2
Virginia         7 1 0
Montana         6 0 1
North Carolina A&M         6 1 0
Florida         6 1 1
Pittsburgh         6 2 1
North Carolina         5 2 0
Utah         4 1 0
Washington State         4 1 0
Dartmouth         5 1 2
Oregon Agricultural         4 2 1
Navy         4 3 1
USC         3 1 2
Army         3 2 0
Oregon         3 2 0
Villanova         3 2 0
Idaho         3 4 0
Maryland         2 5 0

The 1909 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1909 college football season; in their second season under head coach Harry Nelly, the Cadets compiled a 3–2 record, shut out two of their five opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 57 to 32.[1] The team's two losses were to Yale and Harvard; the Army–Navy Game was not played in 1909.[2]

Tackle Daniel Pullen was selected by The New York Times as a second-team player on its All-America team.[3]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result
October 2 Tufts The PlainWest Point, NY W 22–0  
October 9 Trinity The Plain • West Point, NY W 17–6  
October 16 Yale The Plain • West Point, NY L    0–17  
October 23 Lehigh The Plain • West Point, NY W 18–0  
October 30 Harvard The Plain • West Point, NY L    0–9  

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Army Yearly Results (1905-1909)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  2. ^ "1909 Army Black Knights Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  3. ^ "All-America Team Picked on Form Shown During 1909: Problems Confronting Experts Who Take Up This Thankless and Difficult Task of Choosing the So-Called "Best."" (PDF). The New York Times. November 28, 1909.