1910 Mikhailov

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1910 Mikhailov
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Zhuravleva
Discovery site Crimean Astrophysical Obs.
Discovery date 8 October 1972
Designations
MPC designation (1910) Mikhailov
Named after
Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Mikhailov (astronomer)[2]
1972 TZ1 · 1950 QR
1954 JL · 1959 GP
1959 JK · 1961 TR
1969 DD · A916 FC
main-belt (outer)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 101.08 yr (36,918 days)
Aphelion 3.2070 AU
Perihelion 2.8886 AU
3.0478 AU
Eccentricity 0.0522
5.32 yr (1,943 days)
30.146°
0° 11m 6.72s / day
Inclination 10.366°
200.86°
329.91°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 29.2 km[3]
31.3 km[4]
37.201±0.080[5]
8.88 h (0.370 d)[1]
0.032±0.007[5]
0.050 [4]
0.057 [3]
C[3]
11.5[1]

1910 Mikhailov, provisional designation 1972 TZ1, is a carbonaceous asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 35 kilometers in diameter. Discovered at Nauchnyj in 1972, it was named after Russian astronomer Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Mikhailov.

Discovery[edit]

Mikhailov was discovered on 8 October 1972, by Ukrainian astronomer Lyudmila Zhuravleva at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj, on the Crimean peninsula.[6]

Zhuravleva is ranked 61 in Harvard's ranking of those who discovered minor planets. Detween 1972 and 1992, She discovered 200 such bodies, 13 of which were co-discoveries.[7]

Orbit and classification[edit]

The C-type asteroid orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.9–3.2 AU once every 5 years and 4 months (1,943 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.05 and an inclination of 10° with respect to the ecliptic.

Physical characteristics[edit]

It has a rotation period of 8.88 hours[1] and a low geometric albedo of 0.05.

Naming[edit]

The asteroid was named in honor of prominent Russian astronomer Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Mikhailov (1888–1983), a gravimetrist and academician, who was vice-president of the International Astronomical Union, director of the Pulkovo Observatory, a member of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and president of its Astronomical Council.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1910 Mikhailov (1972 TZ1)" (2017-04-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1910) Mikhailov. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 153. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1910) Mikhailov". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; Cabrera, M. S. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "1910 Mikhailov (1972 TZ1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  7. ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number of discoveries)". Minor Planet Center. 27 October 2015. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 

External links[edit]