1912 College Football All-Southern Team

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Innis Brown as a player.

The 1912 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1912 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Lew Hardage was selected for Walter Camp's third-team All-American. Vanderbilt won the SIAA championship. Georgetown won the SAIAA championship.

Innis Brown, a referee throughout the south, and captain of Vanderbilt's 1905 championship team, was hired to select the team of the Atlanta Constitution. The Constitution's editor Dick Jemison also selected a team. Former Georgia player and captain and then assistant Harold Ketron selected a team. Georgia Tech head coach John Heisman as usual picked one also. Former Mississippi head coach Nathan Stauffer selected an All-Southern team for Collier's Weekly.

Composite eleven[edit]

The composite All-Southern eleven formed by "consolidated pick" of ten sporting writers culled by the Atlanta Constitution editor Dick Jemison included:

  • Rube Barker, tackle for Mississippi. Later, he was a practicing physician in Oakland, Illinois.[1]
  • Enoch Brown, end for Vanderbilt. Known as "Nuck," he was a Rhodes Scholar.[2]
  • Tom Brown, tackle for Vanderbilt. He played with the Toledo Maroons and was later a physician. "He had no peers in his orthopedic ability and contributed greatly to Toledo medicine."[3]
  • Jenks Gillem, end for Sewanee. He was a renowned punter and kicker,[4] selected as the punter for the Associated Press Southeast Area All-Time football team 1869-1919 era,[5] he later coached.
  • Lew Hardage, halfback and senior-captain for Vanderbilt, unanimous selection, was also selected third-team All-American by Walter Camp, the fourth ever Southern player to get such a recognition.[6] Innis Brown in 1912 wrote "Hardage has been rated as probably the most successful man in the south at making forward passes."
  • B. J. Lamb, tackle for Auburn. Known as "Sheep," he practiced tackling on trees.[7]
  • Bob McWhorter, halfback for Georgia, unanimous selection. He was the school's first All-American, inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954. Sportswriter Dick Jemison said "When you mention football to an Athens fan its definition is Bob McWhorter, and vice-versa."[8] He was selected for the Associated Press Southeast Area All-Time football team 1869-1919 era.[5] McWhorter went on to have a lengthy law career.
  • Hugh Morgan, center for Vanderbilt, unanimous selection. Chosen "by a good margin" wrote Brown.[4] Later, he was a world-renowned internist and medical professor.
  • David Peacock, guard for Georgia. Known as "Emp," was an assistant coach for his alma mater in 1914, he was once president pro-tempore of the Georgia state Senate.[9]
  • Ammie Sikes, fullback for Vanderbilt. Brown chose him for his speed.[4]
  • Lee Tolley, quarterback for Sewanee. Later, he was a Southeastern Conference official.[10]

Composite overview[edit]

Lew Hardage, Bob McWhorter, and Hugh Morgan were unanimous All-Southern selections.

Name Position School First-team selections
Lew Hardage Halfback Vanderbilt 10
Bob McWhorter Halfback Georgia 10
Hugh Morgan Center Vanderbilt 10
Enoch Brown End Vanderbilt 8
Tom Brown Tackle Vanderbilt 8
Ammie Sikes Fullback Vanderbilt 8
B. J. Lamb Tackle Auburn 8
Jenks Gillem End Sewanee 7
Hargrove Van de Graaff End Alabama 6
Rube Barker Tackle Ole Miss 6
David Peacock Guard Georgia 6
Lee Tolley Quarterback Sewanee 4
Big Thigpen Guard Auburn 2
Jim Stoney Guard Sewanee 2
F. C. Burns Guard Auburn 2
John Henderson Guard Georgia 2
Guts Meadows Guard Auburn 2
Kirk Newell Halfback Auburn 2
Paul A. Reule Fullback Mississippi A & M 2
R. N. MacCallum Guard Sewanee 1
Herman Daves Guard Vanderbilt 1
Rip Major Quarterback Auburn 1
Alf McDonald Quarterback Georgia Tech 1
Ralph Fletcher Quarterback Ole Miss 1

All-Southerns of 1912[edit]

Ends[edit]

Tackles[edit]

Guards[edit]

Centers[edit]

  • Hugh Morgan, Vanderbilt (C, IB, NS-2, SS [as g], H, HK, BAH, NT)
  • John C. Adams, Mississippi (NS-1, AT)
  • Brooks Garrett, Tulane (SS)

Quarterbacks[edit]

Halfbacks[edit]

Fullbacks[edit]

Key[edit]

Bold = Composite selection

† = Unanimous selection

C = received votes for a composite All-Southern eleven from one of ten sports writers compiled by Dick Jemison of the Atlanta Constitution, called the "consolidated pick." The ten came from Innis Brown, John Heisman, Jemison, Julian Murphey, Harold Ketron, The Birmingham Age-Herald, Atticus Mullin, The Montgomery Advertiser, the Memphis Commercial-Appeal and the Nashville Democrat. Votes for multiple positions are combined. Most chose Rube Barker as a guard in this composite.[11]

IB = selected by Innis Brown, captain of 1905 Vanderbilt football team and referee throughout the South.[4]

NS = selected by Nathan P. Stauffer of Collier's Weekly.[12][13][14] It had a first and second team, denoted by the numbers 1 or 2.

SS = selected by Sam Sarokin, sporting editor for the New Orleans Item.[12]

H = selected by John Heisman, coach at the Georgia Institute of Technology, as published in Fuzzy Woodruff's A History of Southern Football 1890-1928.

HK = selected by Harold Ketron.[15]

BAH = selected by the Birmingham Age-Herald.[16]

NT = posted in the Nashville Tennessean.[17]

AT = an All-Southern team which played against an All-Texas squad.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lawrence Wells (1980). Ole Miss Football. p. 14. 
  2. ^ Henry Jay Case. "Vanderbilt–A University of the New South". Outing. 64: 327. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ "In Memoriam, Dr. Thomas H. Brown". The Toledo Rotary Spoke. September 15, 1972. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Innis Brown's All-Southern". Atlanta Constitution. December 1, 1912. Retrieved March 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ a b "All-Time Football Team Lists Greats Of Past, Present". Gadsden Times. July 27, 1969. 
  6. ^ "On the Gridiron and Diamond". The Kappa Alpha Journal. 30 (2): 211. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ "New Book On Auburn Is Most Informative". Gadsden Times. August 25, 1973. 
  8. ^ Patrick Garbin. "Bob McWhorter: "Everybody's All-American"". p. 6. 
  9. ^ "Hon. Roscoe Peacock, "Vice President of Senate"". Weekly Banner. June 29, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via Digital Library of Georgia.  open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ "Deaths". Sewanee News: 14. 1973. 
  11. ^ "Consolidated All-Southern Chosen by Ten Scribes; Eleven Like Innis Brown's". Atlanta Constitution. December 3, 1912. p. 10. Retrieved March 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ a b Spalding's Football Guide. 1913. pp. 25, 65. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via archive.org. open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=hXcjAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA12-PA13&lpg#v=onepage&q&f=false
  14. ^ Nathan P. Stauffer. "Collier's All-Southern Football Team". Collier's Weekly. 50: 13. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "How All-Southern Team Looks to Coach Ketron". The Washington Times. December 4, 1912. p. 13. Retrieved March 3, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ "Birmingham Man Has All-Southern Eleven". The Washington Times. December 4, 1912. p. 13. Retrieved March 10, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ Spick Hall (December 8, 1912). "All-Southern Football Team Selected For 1912". The Tennessean. p. 13. Retrieved September 21, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ "Texans Should Win Out". The Houston Post. December 29, 1912. p. 18. Retrieved May 14, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read