1913–14 Toronto Hockey Club season

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1913–14 Toronto Hockey Club
Stanley Cup champions
1913–14 record 13–7–0
Home record 8–2–0
Road record 5–5–0
Goals for 93
Goals against 65
Team information
General Manager Percy Quinn
Coach Jack Marshall
Captain Scotty Davidson
Arena Arena Gardens

The 1913–14 Toronto Hockey Club season was the second season of the Toronto franchise in the National Hockey Association (NHA). The Blue Shirts would win the NHA championship in a playoff to take over the Stanley Cup. The club then played and defeated the Victoria Aristocrats in the first hockey "World Series" against the champion of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA).

Off-season[edit]

Bruce Ridpath resigned as general manager of the club prior to the season, replaced by Jack Marshall. Ridpath himself tried out as a player but gave up his comeback before the season started. Of the previous season's squad, Archie McLean was dropped and Frank Nighbor moved to British Columbia. Jack Walker, who had played one game with Toronto in the previous season before playing in the Maritime league was added. Con Corbeau was acquired from the Toronto Ontarios just before the start of the season.[1]

Regular season[edit]

The 1913–14 Torontos

Harry Cameron suffered a separated shoulder and the Torontos acquired George McNamara from the Ontarios for cash in mid-season. The Torontos had a two-game lead in the standings with two games to go, but lost both to drop into a tie with the Montreal Canadiens. It was rumoured that the Torontos had thrown the last two games to get an extra home game from a final with Montreal.[2]

Final standings[edit]

National Hockey Association
GP W L T P GF GA
Toronto Hockey Club 20 13 7 0 26 93 65
Montreal Canadiens 20 13 7 0 26 85 65
Quebec Bulldogs 20 12 8 0 24 111 73
Ottawa Senators 20 11 9 0 22 65 71
Montreal Wanderers 20 7 13 0 14 102 125
Toronto Ontarios 20 4 16 0 8 61 118

[3]

Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, P = Points, GF= Goals For, GA = Goals Against


Schedule and results[edit]

# Date Visitor Score Home Record Pts
1 December 27 Montreal Canadiens 0–3 Toronto 1–0–0 2
2 December 30 Toronto 3–7 Montreal Wanderers 1–1–0 2
3 January 3 Quebec Bulldogs 3–6 Toronto 2–1–0 4
4 January 7 Toronto 9–3 Toronto Ontarios 3–1–0 6
5 January 10 Ottawa Senators 3–2 Toronto 3–2–0 6
6 January 14 Montreal Wanderers 2–10 Toronto 4–2–0 8
7 January 17 Toronto 9–4 Quebec Bulldogs 5–2–0 10
8 January 21 Toronto Ontarios 2–9 Toronto 6–2–0 12
9 January 24 Toronto 1–4 Ottawa Senators 6–3–0 12
10 January 28 Toronto 3–4 Montreal Canadiens 6–4–0 12
11 January 31 Toronto 5–3 Montreal Wanderers 7–4–0 14
12 February 4 Ottawa Senators 1–2 Toronto 8–4–0 16
13 February 7 Toronto 3–9 Montreal Canadiens 8–5–0 16
14 February 11 Quebec Bulldogs 3–4 Toronto 9–5–0 18
15 February 14 Toronto Ontarios 1–3 Toronto 10–5–0 20
16 February 18 Toronto 4–1 Ottawa Senators 11–5–0 22
17 February 21 Montreal Canadiens 2–3 Toronto 12–5–0 24
18 February 25 Toronto 6–1 Toronto Ontarios 13–5–0 26
19 February 28 Toronto 3–5 Quebec Bulldogs 13–6–0 26
20 March 4 Montreal Wanderers 7–5 Toronto 13–7–0 26

[4]

NHA playoffs[edit]

Tied at the top of the standings, the Blueshirts and Canadiens faced off in a two-game, total goals series for the league championship and Stanley Cup. The Blueshirts won the series 6–2.

Toronto 6, Montreal Canadiens 2
# Date Visitor Score Home Record
1 March 7 Toronto 0–2 Montreal Canadiens 0–1
2 March 11 Montreal Canadiens 0–6 Toronto 1–1

[4]

Stanley Cup playoffs[edit]

The 1913–14 season marked the end of the challenge era in Stanley Cup history. After dispatching the Canadiens, the Blueshirts faced off against the Victoria Aristocrats of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) in a best-of-five series, with all games played at the Arena Gardens. As one of the duties of the hockey commission for the NHA, PCHA and Maritime leagues, the playoff with the PCHA had been arranged prior to the season, but it had not been cleared with the Stanley Cup trustees. A controversy erupted when a letter arrived from the Stanley Cup trustees on March 17, that the trustees would not let the Stanley Cup travel west, as they did not consider Victoria a proper challenger because they had not formally notified the trustees.[5] However, on March 18, Trustee William Foran stated that it was a misunderstanding. PCHA president Frank Patrick had not filed a challenge, because he had expected Emmett Quinn of the NHA to make all of the arrangements in his role as hockey commissioner, whereas the trustees thought they were being deliberately ignored. In any case, all arrangements had been ironed out and the Victoria challenge was accepted.[6][7] The trustees later sent a letter to league executives that Stanley Cup playoff arrangements would be handled by the leagues themselves henceforth.

Total attendance for the series was 14,260, out of a possible 22,500 (including standing room) capacity at the Arena. At the time, professional hockey was less of a draw than Ontario Hockey Association (OHA) senior hockey. Two games between local OHA senior teams had drawn over 14,000.[8] The Torontos players and staff received $297 each as their share of the gate receipts.[9]

Toronto 3, Victoria 0
# Date Visitor Score Home Record
1 March 14 Victoria Aristocrats 2–5 Toronto 1–0
2 March 17 Victoria Aristocrats 5–6 Toronto 2–0
3 March 19 Victoria Aristocrats 1–2 Toronto 3–0

[4]

Toronto Hockey Club 1914 Stanley Cup Champions[edit]

When the Stanley Cup arrived in Toronto, it was put on public display in the window of the Eaton's department store.[10]

Players

  Defencemen

† missing from team picture
‡ also played rover in the Stanley Cup Final

Coaching and administrative staff:

Stanley Cup engraving

"1914 Toronto H.C." is engraved on the 1947 ring connecting the upper trophy to the barrel

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Harper, Stephen J. (2013). A Great Game: The Forgotten Leafs and the Rise of Professional Hockey. Simon & Schuster Canada. ISBN 978-1-4767-1653-4. 
  • Zweig, Eric (2012). Stanley Cup: 120 years of hockey supremacy. Firefly Books. ISBN 978-1-77085-104-7. 
Notes
  1. ^ Harper 2013, pp. 248–249.
  2. ^ Harper 2013, pp. 251–252.
  3. ^ Standings: Coleman, Charles (1966). Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol. 1, 1893-1926 inc. National Hockey League. p. 255. 
  4. ^ a b c Coleman, Charles (1966). The Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1, 1893–1926 inc. NHL. 
  5. ^ "Stanley Cup Contest May Not Be for the Mug, After All is Said". Saskatoon Phoenix. March 18, 1914. p. 8. 
  6. ^ "A Tempest In a Teapot". Montreal Daily Mail. March 19, 1914. p. 9. 
  7. ^ "Stanley Cup Muddle Cleared Up". Toronto Globe and Mail. March 19, 1914. 
  8. ^ "Puckerings". Toronto Globe. March 21, 1914. p. 22. 
  9. ^ "Toronto Players Receive $297 Each". Toronto Globe. March 21, 1914. p. 22. 
  10. ^ Zweig 2012, p. 280.