1920 Tulane Green Wave football team

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1920 Tulane Green Wave football
SIAA co-champion
Conference Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1920 record 6–2–1 (5–0 SIAA)
Head coach Clark Shaughnessy (6th season)
Offensive scheme Single wing
Captain John Wight
Home stadium Second Tulane Stadium
(Capacity: 11,000)[1]
Seasons
← 1919
1921 →
1920 SIAA football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Georgia + 7 0 0     8 0 1
Tulane + 5 0 0     6 2 1
Georgia Tech + 4 0 0     8 1 0
Alabama 6 1 0     10 1 0
Furman 3 1 0     9 1 0
South Carolina 3 1 0     5 4 0
Tennessee 5 2 0     7 2 0
Auburn 4 2 0     7 2 0
Mississippi A&M 4 2 0     5 3 0
Sewanee 3 3 1     4 3 1
Vanderbilt 3 3 0     4 3 1
Howard 2 3 0     3 5 1
Mississippi College 2 4 0     3 5 0
Clemson 2 6 0     4 6 1
Florida 1 2 0     6 3 0
Transylvania 1 2 0     1 2 0
LSU 1 3 0     5 3 1
Chattanooga 1 3 0     3 4 1
The Citadel 1 4 0     2 6 0
Ole Miss 0 2 0     4 3 0
Kentucky 0 2 1     3 4 1
Georgetown (KY) 0 2 0     0 3 0
Millsaps 0 3 0     0 3 0
Mercer 0 4 0     2 7 0
Wofford 0 4 0     0 8 1
  • + – Conference co-champions

The 1920 Tulane Green Wave football team represented the Tulane Green Wave of the Tulane University during the 1920 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. The 1920 team tied for the SIAA championship with Georgia and Georgia Tech, and was the first called the "Green Wave", after a song titled "The Rolling Green Wave".[2]

Before the season[edit]

In the prior year of 1919, coach Clark Shaughnessy guided Tulane to a then-school record of seven consecutive wins,[3] and had transformed Tulane into a competitor among Southern collegiate teams.[4]

Though he was famous for later using the T formation, at Tulane Shaughnessy employed the single wing. Shaughnessy also introduced to Tulane the Minnesota shift, an innovation created by his former coach Henry L. Williams.[5]

Germany Schulz was hired to take over duties as athletic director.[6]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result
October 2 Southwestern Louisiana* New Orleans, LA W 79–0  
October 9 Mississippi College New Orleans, LA W 29–0  
October 16 Rice* Heinemann Park • New Orleans, LA T 0–0  
October 23 at Ole Miss Oxford, MS (Rivalry) W 32–0  
October 30 at Michigan* Ferry FieldAnn Arbor, MI L 21–0  
November 6 at Florida Plant FieldTampa, FL W 14–0  
November 13 Mississippi A&M New Orleans, LA W 6–0  
November 25 at LSU Baton Rouge, LA (Rivalry) W 21–0  
December 4 Detroit* New Orleans, LA L 7–0  
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.

[7]

Season summary[edit]

Southwestern Louisiana[edit]

The season opened with a 79–0 victory over Southwestern Louisiana. One full quarter was played by the substitutes.[8]

Mississippi College[edit]

The Mississippi College Choctaws and Goat Hale fell to Tulane 29–0.[8]

Rice[edit]

Rice at Tulane
1 2 3 4 Total
Rice 0 0 0 0 0
Tulane 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[8]

The Rice Owls fought Tulane to a scoreless tie in a game shifted to Heinemann Park.[8]

On Oct. 20, 1920, Earl Sparling, the editor of the Tulane Hullabaloo, wrote a football song which was printed in the newspaper. The song was titled "The Rolling Green Wave." Although the name was not immediately adopted, it began to receive acceptance.[9]

Mississippi[edit]

Tulane beat Mississippi 32–0. Coach Shaughnessy introduced a new shift in the first half, and the players had trouble implementing it.[8] By the second period, Tulane played conventional football instead.[8]

Michigan[edit]

The season's first loss was 21–0 to the Michigan Wolverines in Ann Arbor,[10] succumbing to the northern foes by the second half.[8]

Florida[edit]

Tulane at Florida
1 2 3 4 Total
Tulane 0 0 7 7 14
Florida 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[11]

In Tampa, Tulane beat the Florida Gators 14–0.[8] Florida's Tootie Perry played one of the best games seen in Tampa.[11] Dwyer went over right tackle for the first touchdown, after B. Brown cut loose for a 30-yard run, Richcoon scored the last.[11]

The starting lineup was Beaulau (left end), Unsworth (left tackle), Fitz (left guard), Reed (center), Killinger (right guard), Payne (right tackle), Wight (right end), Richeson (quarterback), Dwyer (left halfback), Brown (right halfback), McGraw (fullback).[12]

Mississippi A&M[edit]

In what the yearbook called "the critical game of the season,"[8] Tulane won 6–0 over the Mississippi Aggies.

LSU[edit]

Tulane triumphed 21–0 over rival LSU,[8] the starting lineup was Wiegand (left end), Payne (left tackle), Fitz (left guard), Reed (center), Unsworth (right guard), Beallieu (right tackle), Wight (right end), Richeson (quarterback), Dwyer (left halfback), Brown (right halfback), Smith (fullback).[13]

Detroit[edit]

Detroit at Tulane
1 2 3 4 Total
Detroit 7 0 0 0 7
Tulane 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[14]

On a muddy field, the Detroit Titans beat Tulane 7–0. Detroit opened up with passes early, leading to Lauer's off tackle touchdown,[14] the starting lineup was Smith (left end), Payne (left tackle), Unsworth (left guard), Reed (center), Palermo (right guard), Fitz (right tackle), Wight (right end), Richeson (quarterback), Brown (left halfback), Dwyer (right halfback), Beaullieu (fullback).[14]

Players[edit]

Line[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Gaston Beaullieu end
Fits Fitz guard
Killinger guard
Palermo tackle
Virgil Payne tackle
Eddie Reed center New Orleans, Louisiana Spring Hill College
Bennie Smith end and fullback
Johnny Unsworth tackle
Bob Wiegand end
Dicky Wight end
Johnny Wight right end

Backfield[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Bennie Brown right halfback
Bill Dwyer halfback
Mal Maloney quarter and fullback
Forres McGraw fullback
Pinkie Nagle halfback
Harold Quinn quarter and fullback
Lyle Richeson quarterback

[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ryan Whirty (2012-06-26). "The History of Tulane Stadium(s)". Gambit Magazine. Retrieved 2012-09-11. 
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-06-19. Retrieved 2016-05-18. 
  3. ^ Tulane Football History Archived 2016-03-31 at the Wayback Machine., Tulane University, retrieved August 15, 2010.
  4. ^ Leonard Victor Huber, New Orleans: A Pictorial History, p. 258, Pelican Publishing, 1991, ISBN 0-88289-868-X.
  5. ^ Dawson's Tulane System Designed For Super-Power, The Palm Beach Post, December 17, 1939.
  6. ^ "GERMAN" SCHULZ NAMED DIRECTOR TULANE SPORTS, The Atlanta Constitution, July 25, 1920.
  7. ^ https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/schools/tulane/1920-schedule.html
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Jambalaya, 1921
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-24. Retrieved 2016-05-31. 
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-29. Retrieved 2016-05-31. 
  11. ^ a b c "'Gators Put Up Strong Fight Against Tulane". The Florida Alligator. 19 (17). November 12, 1920. 
  12. ^ "'Gators Trimmed By Tulane". The Atlanta Constitution. November 7, 1920. p. 2. Retrieved July 23, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 139
  14. ^ a b c "Detroit Defeats Tulane". The Atlanta Constitution. December 5, 1920. p. 3. Retrieved May 18, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  • Woodruff, Fuzzy (1928). A History of Southern Football 1890–1928. 2.