1922 Florida Gators football team

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1922 Florida Gators football
Conference Southern Conference
1922 record 7–2 (2–0 SoCon)
Head coach William G. Kline (2nd season)
Offensive scheme Multiple
Captain Ferdinand H. Duncan
Home stadium Fleming Field
Uniform
21gatorsuniform.png
Seasons
← 1921
1923 →
1922 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
North Carolina + 5 0 0     9 1 0
Georgia Tech + 4 0 0     7 2 0
Vanderbilt* + 3 0 0     8 0 1
VPI 3 0 0     8 1 1
Florida 2 0 0     7 2 0
Auburn 2 1 0     8 2 0
Tennessee 3 2 0     8 2 0
Alabama 3 2 1     6 3 1
Virginia 1 1 1     4 4 1
Mississippi A&M 2 3 0     3 4 2
Kentucky 1 2 0     6 3 0
Clemson 1 2 0     5 4 0
Washington and Lee 1 2 0     5 3 1
Maryland 1 2 0     4 5 1
LSU 1 2 0     3 7 0
Georgia 1 3 1     5 4 1
Tulane 1 4 0     4 4 0
South Carolina 0 2 0     5 4 0
Ole Miss 0 2 0     4 5 1
NC State 0 5 0     4 6 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
  • * – co-member of SIAA

The 1922 Florida Gators football team represented the Florida Gators of the University of Florida during the 1922 Southern Conference football season. The season was law professor William G. Kline's third and last year as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Kline's 1922 Florida Gators finished 7–2 overall,[1] and 2–0 in their first year as members of the new Southern Conference, placing fifth of twenty-one teams in the conference standings.

Despite the undefeated conference record, the team played only two conference opponents (Tulane and Clemson) and so did not rank as co-champion with Vanderbilt, Georgia Tech, and North Carolina.[2]

The 1922 Spalding's Football Guide ranked Florida as the best forward passing team in the country. The team had an unexpected loss early in the season to Furman in a close match, but otherwise the season is notable for visiting Washington D. C. and the White House upon traveling North for the first time to face the Harvard Crimson, and the upset of Tulane.

Before the season[edit]

In the first season of the new Southern Conference (SoCon), freshmen were barred from play.[3]

1921 had been the best year in Florida football history. Florida had two of the South's best punters in running backs Ark Newton and Ray Dickson.[4]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 7 Furman* Fleming Field • Gainesville, Florida L 6–7  
October 14 at Rollins* Orlando, Florida W 19–0  
October 21 American Legion* Tampa, Florida W 14–0  
October 28 Howard* Fleming Field • Gainesville, Florida W 57–0  
November 4 at Harvard* Harvard StadiumAllston, Massachusetts L 0–24   30,000
November 11 Mississippi College* Plant FieldTampa, Florida W 58–0   4,000
November 18 at Tulane Second Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, Louisiana W 27–6   6,000
November 25 at Oglethorpe* Ponce de Leon ParkAtlanta, Georgia W 12–0  
December 2 Clemson Barrs Field • Jacksonville, Florida W 47–14  
*Non-conference game.

Primary source: 2015 Florida Gators Football Media Guide.,[1]

Season summary[edit]

Week 1: Furman[edit]

Week 1: Furman at Florida
1 234Total
Furman 7 000 7
Florida 0 600 6

The lone upset of the year happened in the opening game with a 7 to 6 loss to coach Billy Laval's Furman Purple Hurricane.[5] A muddy and slippery field plagued the first half. Florida had two touchdowns called back and halfback Case once fell down with a clear field in front of him. The Gators' only score was made in a downpour.[6]

Florida completed just two passes. Furman scored on its only completed pass, a long one of 60+ yards. Ark Newton once failing to kick goal proved to be the difference.[7] As a result of this game, the coaches revised their tactics and strategy.[4]

The starting lineup was: Coleman (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Norton (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Barchan (quarterback), Pomeroy (left halfback), Newton (right halfback), Hockenstadt (fullback).[5]

Week 2: Rollins[edit]

Again rain and a soggy field hampered play in the second week against the Rollins Tars in Orlando. Florida only rolled up 19 points with the new tactics.[8] Dickson made two touchdowns and Newton one.[9]

The starting lineup was: Coleman (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Norton (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Barchan (quarterback), Pomeroy (left halfback), Newton (right halfback), Dickson (fullback).[9]

Week 3: American Legion[edit]

Week 3: American Legion at Florida
1 234Total
Legion 0 000 0
Florida 0 077 14

Facing many former college football stars, including Hall of Famer Buck Flowers, who netted a 74-yard punt during the contest, Florida defeated American Legion 14–0 in Tampa using much of the new style of play.[10] Stewart Pomeroy scored both touchdowns and Ray Dickson made both extra points.[11] The last touchdown from Pomeroy was "a beautiful run around right end."[11]

Week 4: Howard[edit]

In the game against coach Harris Cope's Howard Bulldogs in Gainesville, Florida seemed to find its stride within the coaches' new system, winning 57–0.[8] Coleman broke his collarbone.[12]

The starting lineup was: Coleman (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Byrd (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Pomeroy (quarterback), Case (left halfback), Newton (right halfback), Dickson (fullback).[12]

Week 5: at Harvard[edit]

Week 5: Florida at Harvard
1 234Total
Florida 0 000 0
Harvard 14 307 24

In the Gators' first ever game against a traditional northeastern college football power, they traveled north to meet coach Bob Fisher's Harvard Crimson. On their way north the Gators stopped in Washington, D. C. and were greeted by President Warren Harding.[13]

The Gator team met President Harding (pictured) prior to the Harvard game.

Harvard subs overwhelmed the Florida team 24 to 0 in front of the largest crowd yet to see the Gators play. One writer spoke of "the desperate rally of Florida's 'Gators against the overwhelming Harvard attack" which despite the loss "showed the 'Gators probably the best team the Gainesville institution has turned out."[14] The stars for Florida that day included backs Ray Dickson and Ark Newton. On the line, Robbie Robinson, "who at times stood Harvard's backs on their heads," played well. "Robinson and Duncan stood out all afternoon." [15]

The starting lineup was: Hockinstadt (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Byrd (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Pomeroy (quarterback), Newton (left halfback), Case (right halfback), Dickson (fullback).[15][16]

Week 6: Mississippi College[edit]

Week 6: Mississippi College at Florida
1 234Total
Mississippi 0 000 0
Florida 0 131332 58

In Tampa on Plant Field, the Gators defeated coach Stanley L. Robinson's Mississippi College Choctaws 58 to 0. Florida played poorly in the first quarter.[17] The highlight of the game was Ark Newton's run of 72 yards in the second quarter.[18][19]

The starting lineup was: Mounts (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Byrd (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Barchan (quarterback), Case (left halfback), Newton (right halfback), Dickson (fullback).[19]

Week 7: at Tulane[edit]

Week 7: Florida at Tulane
1 234Total
Florida 6 0714 27
Tulane 0 600 6
  • Date: November 18
  • Location: Tulane Stadium
    New Orleans, LA
  • Game attendance: 6,000
  • Referee: Bonner (Auburn)

In the seventh week of play, Florida defeated coach Clark Shaughnessy's Tulane Green Wave in New Orleans 27 to 6 in an upset.[20][21] Fullback Ray Dickson was all over the field tackling Tulane's players. He knocked Tulane center Eddie Reed out of the game on a hit which got an unnecessary roughness penalty.[22]

Ark Newton.

After the first half ended in a 6–6 tie, the Gators opened up a passing attack in the second half "which could not be stopped."[23] One sportswriter claimed Ark Newton threw 13 completions in a row.[24] "Newton gave the greatest halfback exhibition this season in New Orleans."[22]

The starting lineup was: Hockinstadt (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Byrd (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Barchan (quarterback), Newton (left halfback), Case (right halfback), Dickson (fullback).[20][22]

Week 8: at Oglethorpe[edit]

Week 8: Florida at Oglethorpe
1 234Total
Florida 0 606 12
Oglethorpe 0 000 0

Freezing weather and a stony field in Atlanta made for unexpected trouble against the Oglethorpe Stormy Petrels. Florida defeated the Petrels by just a 12 to 0 score.[25] End Ferdinand H. Duncan scored all of Florida's points. "Albeit Duncan did the damage...most of the credit for the victory should go to Newton."[26]

The starting lineup was: Hockinstad (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Byrd (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Duncan (right end), Barchan (quarterback), Case (left halfback), Newton (right halfback), Dickson (fullback).[26]

Week 9: Clemson[edit]

Week 9: Clemson at Florida
1 234Total
Clemson 0 770 14
Florida 6 131414 47

The Gators defeated the Clemson Tigers 47 to 14 using a repertoire of shifting tactics.[27][28] They also used hard line plunges and forward passes. "Newton and Pomeroy provided the thrills from the Florida side."[29] A description of the game reads "The whistle frequently found Ark Newton, Florida's star on his feet with four or five of the Carolinians clinging around him and the others smothered under the Florida poundage."[30]

The starting lineup was: Mounts (left end), Robinson (left tackle), Byrd (left guard), Gunn (center), Scott (right guard), Doty (right tackle), Hockenstad (right end), Barchan (quarterback), Pomeroy (left halfback), Case (right halfback), Newton (fullback).[27]

Postseason[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

The season trumped the accomplishments even of last year's team.[4] Newton was selected for the All-Southern team of Ed Hebert of the Times-Picayune in 1922.[31]

The 1922 freshman team was a Southern champion, coached by Florida native and former Yale All-American John Acosta.[32][n 1]

Kline's departure[edit]

After the 1922–1923 school year, Kline resigned to pursue a legal career,[33] and returned to the University of Nebraska, where he was the head coach of the Nebraska Cornhuskers basketball and baseball teams, and later became a published author of books on coaching football, basketball and baseball. He was replaced at Florida by assistant Van Fleet.

Personnel[edit]

Line[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Calhoun Byrd guard 8
Robert Carlton center 0
Arthur Doty tackle 8 6'0" 198
Ferdinand H. Duncan end 7 University of South Dakota 6'2" 200 26
Eric Dunn center 8 Kissimmee 6'6" 200
George Hodges guard 0
Lloyd Hokenstad end 4
Mervin Mounts end 2 5'9" 155
Robbie Robinson tackle 8 Mobile, Alabama 6'0" 180 20
Ivan Scott guard 8 6'0" 180

Backfield[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Joseph Barchan quarterback 6
Osmond Bie halfback 0
Lawrence Case halfback 6 St. Augustine
Ray Dickson fullback 6 6'0" 202
Ark Newton halfback 8 Camden, Arkansas Camden High 6'1" 185 19
Stewart Pomeroy halfback/quarterback 5 Tampa 5'6" 150

[34]

Coaching staff[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The team included Cy Williams, Goldy Goldstein, Edgar Jones, and Bill Middlekauff.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 2015 Florida Gators Football Media Guide Archived 2015-12-08 at the Wayback Machine., University Athletic Association, Gainesville, Florida, pp. 107–108 (2015). Retrieved August 15, 2015.
  2. ^ 2009 Southern Conference Football Media Guide, Year-by-Year Standings, Southern Conference, Spartanburg, South Carolina, p. 74 (2009). Retrieved August 30, 2010.
  3. ^ "Drastic Rules Are Adopted By New Southern Conference To Keep College Sports Clean". The Atlanta Constitution. February 27, 1921. p. 2. Retrieved August 16, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ a b c University of Florida 1923, p. 97
  5. ^ a b "Florida Loses Initial Game To Furman By Close Score of 7-6 In Hard Fought Battle Saturday". Florida Alligator. October 1, 1922. 
  6. ^ "Furman Wins From Florida Eleven By Score of 7 to 6". Greensboro Daily News. October 8, 1922. p. 18. Retrieved August 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ "Failure To Kick Goal Gave Game To Furman". Winston-Salem Journal. October 8, 1922. p. 7. Retrieved August 21, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  8. ^ a b University of Florida 1923, p. 98
  9. ^ a b "Gators Outclass Rollins; Score Three Touchdowns Game Was Played In Rain". Florida Alligator. October 15, 1922. 
  10. ^ "For 'Gators". Atlanta Constitution. October 26, 1922. p. 10. Retrieved August 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ a b "Gators Take Third Game From State Legion team In Tampa By 14-0 Score". Florida Alligator. October 21, 1922. 
  12. ^ a b "Gators Swamp Howard Team; Score Is 58 to 0". Florida Alligator. October 28, 1922. 
  13. ^ "Harvard Is Held To 24 Points Only Ten After First Quarter". Florida Alligator. November 5, 1922. 
  14. ^ Associated Press (November 6, 1922). "Brilliant Battles Marked Saturday's Football Games". Durham Morning Herald. p. 7. Retrieved August 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ a b "Harvard Subs Find Florida Team Easy". The New York Times. November 5, 1922. p. 26. Retrieved August 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ "Harvard Pierces Hide of 'Gators". Asheville Citizen. November 5, 1922. p. 18. Retrieved August 21, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ "Mississippi Unable To Score On Florida Varsity Wins 58-0". Florida Alligator. November 12, 1922. 
  18. ^ "Florida Beats Mississippi". The Wilmington Morning Star. November 13, 1922. p. 7. Retrieved August 21, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  19. ^ a b "'Gators Ruin Mississippi". Atlanta Constitution. November 12, 1922. p. 2. Retrieved August 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  20. ^ a b Woodruff 1928, p. 222
  21. ^ "'Gators Even Old Scores With Tulane, Take Game 27 to 6; Newton Is Star". Florida Alligator. November 18, 1922. 
  22. ^ a b c "Heavy Florida Team Batters Down Tulane's Defense and Wins, 27-6". Atlanta Constitution. November 19, 1922. p. 3. Retrieved August 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  23. ^ "Florida Gators Wallop Tulane's Battling Bunch". The Anniston Star. November 19, 1922. p. 8. Retrieved August 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  24. ^ "Prokop Duplicated Ark Newton's Feat". The Miami News. November 19, 1943. 
  25. ^ "Oglethorpe Holds Gators to Close Score of 12 to 0 Saturday". Florida Alligator. November 25, 1922. 
  26. ^ a b Paul Warwick (November 26, 1922). "Oglethorpe Is Defeated by Florida Gator, 12-0; Duncan Proves Big Star". Atlanta Constitution. p. 1. Retrieved August 21, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  27. ^ a b "Florida Smother The Clemson Team 47 to 14". The Charlotte Observer. December 3, 1922. p. 1. Retrieved August 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  28. ^ "Varsity Takes Final Game of Season From Clemson Piles Up 47 Points to 14". Florida Alligator. December 2, 1922. 
  29. ^ "University of Florida Wins Over Clemson, But Tigers Score Twice". Atlanta Constitution. December 3, 1922. p. 3. Retrieved August 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  30. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall "Florida's Force Baffles Tigers". The State. December 3, 1922. 
  31. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall"Selection of Mythical All-Southern Grid Team Difficult Task; Much Star Talent of Dixie Elevens This Season". The Montgomery Advertiser. December 3, 1922. 
  32. ^ Harry Gardner Cutler (1923). History of Florida : Past and Present, Historical and Biographical. 2. p. 330. 
  33. ^ Carlson, p. 27
  34. ^ University of Florida 1923, pp. 99-104

Bibliography[edit]

  • Carlson, Norm (2007). University of Florida Football Vault: The History of the Florida Gators. Atlanta, Georgia: Whitman Publishing, LLC. ISBN 0-7948-2298-3. 
  • University of Florida (1923). The Seminole.