1926 Michigan State Spartans football team

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1926 Michigan State Spartans football
Conference Independent
1926 record 3–4–1
Head coach Ralph H. Young (4th season)
Seasons
← 1925
1927 →
1926 NCAA independents football records
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Brown         9 0 1
Navy         9 0 1
Notre Dame         9 1 0
Furman         8 1 1
Army         7 1 1
Penn         7 1 1
Carnegie Tech         7 2 0
Syracuse         7 2 1
Citadel         7 3 0
Cornell         6 1 1
Villanova         6 2 1
Pittsburgh         5 2 2
Penn State         5 4 0
Wake Forest         5 4 1
Yale         4 4 0
Michigan State         3 4 1
Delaware         3 5 0
Havard         3 5 0
Duke         3 6 0
Drexel         2 5 0

The 1926 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State College in the 1926 college football season. In their fourth year under head coach Ralph H. Young, the Spartans compiled a 3–4–1 record and were outscored by their opponents 171 to 97.[1][2]

Schedule[edit]

DateOpponentSiteResult
September 26AdrianW 16–0
October 2Kalamazoo
  • College Field
  • East Lansing, MI
W 9–0
October 9at Michigan (rivalry)L 3–55
October 16at CornellL 14–24
October 23Lake Forest
  • College Field
  • East Lansing, MI
T 0–0
October 30at Colgate
L 6–38
November 6Centredagger
  • College Field
  • East Lansing, MI
W 42–14
November 20Haskell
  • College Field
  • East Lansing, MI
L 7–40
  • daggerHomecoming

Game summaries[edit]

Michigan[edit]

On October 9, 1926, Michigan State lost to Michigan by a 55–3 score.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 Football Media Guide" (PDF). Michigan State University. pp. 146, 152. Retrieved June 14, 2017. 
  2. ^ "1926 Michigan State Spartans Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 14, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Michigan Wins, 55-3". Chicago Tribune. October 10, 1926. 
  4. ^ "Michigan Gallops to Victory, 55 to 3: Michigan State Unable to Cope With Fast Running and Passing Game". The New York Times. October 10, 1926.