1932 Big Ten Conference football season

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1932 Big Ten Conference football season
Sport Football
Number of teams 10
Co-champions Michigan, Purdue
Season MVP Harry Newman[1]
Football seasons
← 1931
1933 →
1932 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Michigan + 6 0 0     8 0 0
#4 Purdue + 5 0 1     7 0 1
#11 Wisconsin 4 1 1     6 1 1
#6 Ohio State 2 1 2     4 1 3
Northwestern 2 3 1     3 4 1
Minnesota 2 3 0     5 3 0
Illinois 2 4 0     5 4 0
Indiana 1 4 1     3 4 1
Chicago 1 4 0     3 4 1
Iowa 0 5 0     1 7 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from Dickinson System

The 1932 Big Ten Conference football season was the 37th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1932 college football season.

Big Ten co-champion Michigan compiled a perfect 8–0 record, outscored opponents 123 to 12, shut out six of eight opponents, and allowed an average of only 1.6 points per game. Michigan quarterback Harry Newman was a consensus first-team All-American and won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference. Michigan was awarded the Knute K. Rockne Trophy, narrowly prevailing over USC as the national champion under the Dickinson System.

Co-champion Purdue compiled a 7–0–1 record, had the conference's leading scoring offense with an average of 20.5 points per game, and was ranked No. 4 under the Dickinson System. Fullback Roy Horstmann was Purdue's most valuable player and was selected as a first-team All-American by several selectors. End Paul Moss was a consensus first-team All-American.

Season overview[edit]

Results and team statistics[edit]

Conf. Rank Team Head coach DS Overall record Conf. record PPG PAG MVP
1 (tie) Michigan Harry Kipke #1 8–0 6–0 15.4 1.6 Harry Newman
1 (tie) Purdue Noble Kizer #4 7–0–1 5–0–1 20.5 5.3 Roy Horstmann
3 Wisconsin Clarence Spears #11 6–1–1 4–1–1 18.9 6.0 Mickey McGuire
4 Ohio State Sam Willaman #5 4–1–3 2–1–2 11.3 5.1 Lewis Hinchman
5 Northwestern Dick Hanley NR 3–4–1 2–3–1 14.5 9.5 Pug Rentner
6 Minnesota Bernie Bierman NR 5-3 2-3 10.8 5.3 Roy Oen
7 Illinois Robert Zuppke NR 5–4 2–4 10.7 11.2 Gil Berry
8 Indiana Earle C. Hayes NR 3–4–1 1–4–1 8.1 9.5 John Keckich
9 Chicago Amos A. Stagg NR 3–4–1 1–4 11.9 11.8 William Cassels
10 Iowa Ossie Solem NR 1–7 0–5 7.8 21.4 Joe Laws

Key
DS = Ranking in the Dickinson System, a system used at the time to rank the country's best college football teams and to award the Knute Rockne Trophy to the national champion[2]
PPG = Average of points scored per game[3]
PAG = Average of points allowed per game[3]
MVP = Most valuable player as voted by players on each team as part of the voting process to determine the winner of the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy[4]

All-conference players[edit]

The following players received first-team honors from either the Associated Press (AP) or United Press (UP) on the 1932 All-Big Ten Conference football team:

All-Americans[edit]

Two Big Ten players were consensus first-team picks on the 1932 College Football All-America Team:[5]

  • Paul Moss, end, Purdue (AP, UP, CO, AAB, NEA, INS, CP, NYS, NYT, WC, FWAA, LIB, TR, PD, PM)
  • Harry Newman, quarterback, Michigan (AP, UP, CO, AAB, NEA, INS, CP, NYS, NYT, WC, FWAA, LIB, TR, PD, PM)

Other Big Ten players receiving first-team All-American honors from at least one selector were:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Newman Voted Most Valuable Big 10 Player". Chicago Tribune. December 25, 1932. p. 2-1. 
  2. ^ "Trojans Beat Irish But Michigan Gets Title: Kipke Eleven Rated at Top by Dickinson". Detroit Free Press. December 11, 1932. p. 39. 
  3. ^ a b "1932 Big Ten Conference Year Summary". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 26, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Board Begins Vote On Big Ten Most Valuable Player Award". Chicago Tribune. December 4, 1932. p. 2-1. 
  5. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 5. Retrieved August 16, 2014.