1968 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

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1968 Minnesota Golden Gophers football
Conference Big Ten Conference
1968 record 6–4 (5–2 Big Ten)
Head coach Murray Warmath (15th season)
MVP Wayne King
Captain Noel Jenke
Home stadium Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1967
1969 →
1968 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 1 Ohio State $ 7 0 0     10 0 0
No. 12 Michigan 6 1 0     8 2 0
No. 10 Purdue 5 2 0     8 2 0
Minnesota 5 2 0     6 4 0
Indiana 4 3 0     6 4 0
Iowa 4 3 0     5 5 0
Michigan State 2 5 0     5 5 0
Illinois 1 6 0     1 9 0
Northwestern 1 6 0     1 9 0
Wisconsin 0 7 0     0 10 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1968 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1968 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 15th year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–4 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 207 to 190.[1]

Linebacker Wayne King received the team's Most Valuable Player award. End Bob Stein was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, Associated Press, United Press International and Football Writers Association of America. Stein, guard Dick Enderle and guard Noel Jenke were named All-Big Ten first team. Tackle Ezell Jones, defensive tackle Ron Kamzelski, tight end Ray Parson and safety Doug Roalstad were named All-Big Ten second team. Stein was named an Academic All-American. Stein, linebacker Noel Jenke, linebacker Wayne King and halfback Barry Mayer were named Academic All-Big Ten.[2]

Total attendance at six home games was 312,806, an average of 52,134 per game, the largest crowd was against USC.[3]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 21 No. 2 USC* No. 16 Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN L 20–29   60,820
September 28 No. 9 Nebraska* No. 17 Memorial Stadium • Minneapolis, MN (Rivalry) L 14–17   55,362
October 5 Wake Forest* Memorial Stadium • Minneapolis, MN W 24–19   39,277
October 12 Illinoisdagger Memorial Stadium • Minneapolis, MN W 17–10   49,864
October 19 at Michigan State Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI W 14–13   74,321
October 26 at No. 12 Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI (Little Brown Jug) L 20–33   69,384
November 2 Iowa Memorial Stadium • Minneapolis, MN (Rivalry) L 28–35   57,703
November 9 No. 6 Purdue Memorial Stadium • Minneapolis, MN W 27–13   49,780
November 16 at No. 19 Indiana Seventeenth Street Football StadiumBloomington, IN W 20–6   49,234
November 23 at Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI (Rivalry) W 23–15   39,214
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

Game summaries[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Week 6: Minnesota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 0 0 0 20 20
Michigan 12 18 3 0 33

On October 26, 1968, Minnesota lost to Michigan by a 33 to 20 score before a homecoming crowd of 69,384,[4] the game was the 59th meeting in the Little Brown Jug rivalry. Michigan lost the 1967 game by a 20–15 score.[5]

For Michigan, Dennis Brown completed 11 of 20 passes for 152 yards and two touchdowns, and Ron Johnson carried the ball 33 times for 84 yards and two touchdowns. Michigan led 30–0 at halftime and 33–0 at the start of the fourth quarter, but Minnesota mounted a comeback with 20 points in the fourth quarter with Michigan's reserves in the game. Michigan gained 252 rushing yards and 201 passing yards in the game. Minnesota gained 149 rushing yards and 200 passing yards.[4][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1968 Minnesota Golden Gophers Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 1, 2017. 
  2. ^ Keiser, Jeff (2007), 2007 Media Guide (PDF), pp. 179–182 [permanent dead link]
  3. ^ Keiser, Jeff (2007), 2007 Media Guide (PDF), p. 160 
  4. ^ a b Robert Markus (October 27, 1968). "Michigan Romps: Wolverines Keep Big 10 Slate Clean; Destroy Gophers Defense, 33-20". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  5. ^ "Michigan vs. Minnesota". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  6. ^ "untitled". The New York Times. October 27, 1968. p. S7.