1970 Mississippi State Bulldogs football team

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1970 Mississippi State Bulldogs football
Conference Southeastern Conference
1970 record 6–5 (3–4 SEC)
Head coach Charles Shira (4th season)
Home stadium Scott Field
(Capacity: 35,000)
Seasons
← 1969
1971 →
1970 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 7 LSU $ 5 0 0     9 3 0
No. 4 Tennessee 4 1 0     11 1 0
No. 10 Auburn 5 2 0     9 2 0
No. 20 Ole Miss 4 2 0     7 4 0
Florida 3 3 0     7 4 0
Georgia 3 3 0     5 5 0
Alabama 3 4 0     6 5 1
Mississippi State 3 4 0     6 5 0
Vanderbilt 1 5 0     4 7 0
Kentucky 0 7 0     2 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1970 Mississippi State Bulldogs football team represented Mississippi State University during the 1970 college football season. The Bulldogs finished 6–5 for the only winning season in head coach Charles Shira's tenure. The 1970 squad included the first two African-American football players on the Bulldogs' varsity team, defensive back Frank Dowsing and defensive tackle Robert Bell.[1][2]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
September 12 Oklahoma State* Mississippi Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi W 14–13  
September 19 at No. 14 Florida Florida FieldGainesville, Florida L 13–34  
September 26 vs. Vanderbilt Liberty BowlMemphis, Tennessee W 20–6  
October 3 Georgia Mississippi Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi W 7–6  
October 10 Houston* Scott FieldStarkville, Mississippi L 14–31  
October 17 No. 17 Texas Tech* Mississippi Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi W 20–16  
October 24 Southern Miss* Scott FieldStarkville, Mississippi W 51–15  
October 31 at Alabama Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, Alabama (Rivalry) L 6–35  
November 7 at No. 10 Auburn Legion FieldBirmingham, Alabama L 0–56  
November 14 at No. 9 LSU Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana (Rivalry) L 7–38  
November 26 at No. 10 Ole Miss Hemingway StadiumOxford, Mississippi (Egg Bowl) W 19–14  
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Central Time.

[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Banks, Lacy J. "Black football players in the White South". Ebony Magazine (Dec. 1970). 
  2. ^ Martin, Charles (2010). Benching Jim Crow: The Rise and Fall of the Color Line in Southern College Sports, 1890-1980. Urbana, Chicago, and Springfield: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-03551-7. 
  3. ^ College Football @ Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved December 25, 2015