1973 Kansas Jayhawks football team

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1973 Kansas Jayhawks football
Liberty Bowl, L 31–18 vs. NC State
Conference Big Eight Conference
Ranking
Coaches No. 15
AP No. 18
1973 record 7–4–1 (4–2–1 Big 8)
Head coach Don Fambrough (3rd season)
Captain Don Goode, John Bryant
Home stadium Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1972
1974 →
1973 Big 8 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 3 Oklahoma $ 7 0 0     10 0 1
No. 7 Nebraska 4 2 1     9 2 1
No. 18 Kansas 4 2 1     7 4 1
No. 17 Missouri 3 4 0     8 4 0
Oklahoma State 2 3 2     5 4 2
Colorado 2 5 0     5 6 0
Kansas State 2 5 0     5 6 0
Iowa State 2 5 0     4 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1973 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1973 college football season. In their third season under head coach Don Fambrough, the Jayhawks compiled a 7–4–1 record (4–2–1 against conference opponents), tied for second place in the conference, lost to NC State in the 1973 Liberty Bowl, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 253 to 220.[1][2] They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included David Jaynes with 2,349 passing yards, Delvin Williams with 788 rushing yards and Emmett Edwards with 840 receiving yards.[3] Jaynes set six conference passing records and was named the Big Eight Offensive Player of the Year.[4] Don Goode and John Bryant were the team captains.[2] Quarterback David Jaynes, became the first and as of the 2017 voting, the only Jayhawk to be a Heisman Trophy finalist, finishing in 4th place in the voting receiving 65 first place votes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1973 Kansas Jayhawks Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 20, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b 2017 Kansas Football Media Guide, p. 185.
  3. ^ "1973 Kansas Jayhawks Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 20, 2017. 
  4. ^ "Sooners' Switzer Honored". Lincoln Journal Star. December 5, 1973. p. 25 – via Newspapers.com.