1980 WAFL season

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1980 WAFL season
Teams 8
Premiers South Fremantle
(10th premiership)
Minor premiers Swan Districts
(3rd minor premiership)
Matches played 88
Bernie Naylor Medallist Simon Beasley (Swan Districts)
Sandover Medallist Stephen Michael (South Fremantle)
1979 (WANFL)
1981

The 1980 WAFL season was the 96th season of the West Australian Football League in its various incarnations.

The season saw the league drop the word ‘national’ from its official name for the first time in fifty years, reverting to the title in use from 1908 to 1930, it also saw reigning premiers East Fremantle embark on the most rapid slide by any reigning premier since Subiaco went from first to last in 1916. Handicapped by the loss of Mario Turco to North Melbourne and Doug Green to retirement, along with injuries to Jim Sewell, Graham Carter, Swan Districts recruit Mark Olsen and Rod Lester-Smith and form lapses by Tony Buhagiar and Ian Thomson,[1] the blue and whites also lost classy Essendon recruit Darren “Daisy” Williams who returned to Victoria for personal reasons after two matches.[2] Old Easts were to win only five matches all season, and were in danger of their first wooden spoon for eighty-two years before a win in their penultimate game put them safely ahead of Subiaco, who had another disastrous season plagued by financial problems whereby calls to “Save Subi” were opposed by calls from opponents to “Flog Subi”,[3] leading to the worst record by any WA(N)FL club for twelve seasons.

In contrast, Swan Districts had the best start to a WAFL season for twenty-one years, winning their first thirteen matches and gaining a $2000 bonus from Marlboro for winning their first twelve – with a further $200 if they could achieve a perfect home-and-away season.[4] Swans were overpowered at the “business end” by the Mal Brown-coached South Fremantle, who were unbeaten apart from a five-game slump between the fifth and ninth rounds, the Bulldogs’ play late in the season is regarded as some of the finest ever seen in the WAFL, a claim substantiated by their thrashing top VFL club Carlton by 91 points in Escort Championships during March[5] – easily the biggest win by a non-VFL club therein and in fact the biggest loss by a VFL club until the AFC Night Series was restricted thereto.[6]

Home-and-away season[edit]

Round 1 (Easter Weekend)[edit]

Round 1
Saturday, 5 April Subiaco 8.9 (57) def. by West Perth 17.16 (118) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 9148)
Saturday, 5 April South Fremantle 23.23 (161) def. Perth 16.21 (117) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 11128) [1]
Monday, 7 April Claremont 11.17 (83) def. by East Perth 13.13 (91) Claremont Oval (crowd: 15066)
Monday, 7 April Swan Districts 24.17 (161) def. East Fremantle 6.14 (50) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 14906)
  • Mal Brown’s skill in moving rover Noel Carter to the centre and the inexperienced Ross Swetman onto Bosustow ensures South Fremantle fight back after having had only three scoring shots to sixteen late in the opening quarter.[7]
  • In their first game after the 1979 premiership, East Fremantle suffer the worst loss to that point in their history - an ominous sign for the season but a record comprehensively beaten the following year.[8] Craig Holden holds 1979 leading goalkicker Kevin Taylor to 0.2 (2).

Round 2[edit]

Round 2
Saturday, 12 April West Perth 15.11 (101) def. by South Fremantle 15.18 (108) Leederville Oval (crowd: 11755)
Saturday, 12 April East Perth 19.10 (124) def. by Swan Districts 21.20 (146) Perth Oval (crowd: 17,490)
Saturday, 12 April East Fremantle 15.21 (111) def. by Claremont 24.14 (158) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 9556)
Saturday, 12 April Perth 27.20 (182) def. Subiaco 12.10 (82) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5784)
  • Swan Districts show their maturity by warding off two major challenges from East Perth – who take the lead during their third quarter and get within eight points halfway through the last – owing to a superb roving division lead by Neesham and Mike Richardson.[9]
  • The playing of Peake at centre half-forward does not help East Fremantle as their star has only four possessions before being moved into the centre and Claremont build up a lead they easily maintain.[10]

Round 3[edit]

Round 3
Saturday, 19 April Swan Districts 22.23 (155) def. Perth 13.20 (98) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 10190)
Saturday, 19 April Subiaco 8.14 (62) def. by East Perth 23.17 (155) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5104) [11]
Saturday, 19 April West Perth 21.15 (141) def. Claremont 9.12 (66) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8752)
Saturday, 19 April East Fremantle 10.14 (74) def. by South Fremantle 28.13 (181) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 11212)
  • A brilliant display in windy and showery weather dominated by long handballing gives Old Easts a third successive thrashing and shows a below-strength Bulldogs as already better than 1979.[12]
  • West Perth, led by Chris Stasinowsky and centre half-forward Ron Alderton, annihilate Claremont in wet conditions during the last quarter, kicking 12.2 (74) to 1.2 (8).[13]

Round 4[edit]

Round 4
Saturday, 26 April South Fremantle 25.17 (167) def. Subiaco 13.8 (86) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7284) [14]
Saturday, 26 April Claremont 20.18 (138) def. by Swan Districts 23.19 (157) Claremont Oval (crowd: 14547) [15]
Saturday, 26 April East Perth 15.14 (104) def. by East Fremantle 20.22 (142) Perth Oval (crowd: 10012)
Saturday, 26 April Perth 15.17 (107) def. by West Perth 27.12 (174) Lathlain Park (crowd: 10205)

A fine display by the returning Wayne Cormack and improved form by Ken Judge gives East Fremantle a first win and a short-lived hope of moving back to the top.[2] Old Easts jumped the Royals with the first five goals and, despite further injuries that leave Rod Lester-Smith crippled, are never headed.

Round 5[edit]

Round 5
Saturday, 3 May South Fremantle 22.11 (143) def. by Claremont 21.18 (144) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 13028)
Saturday, 3 May Subiaco 8.15 (63) def. by Swan Districts 27.32 (194) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6590)
Saturday, 3 May Perth 18.22 (130) def. East Perth 16.10 (106) Lathlain Park (crowd: 8672)
Saturday, 3 May West Perth 26.24 (180) def. East Fremantle 11.9 (75) Leederville Oval (crowd: 11217)
  • South Fremantle claim a behind was missed – which would have produced the league’s first draw for six seasons[16] – but the appeal was rejected when it was seen that Claremont’s Kevin Worthington was give a free kick whilst a shot by South’s Basil Campbell hit a goalpost.[17]
  • The 32 behinds is the most Swan Districts have ever scored in a WAFL match,[18] beating by five the previous record against East Perth from 1955.

Round 6[edit]

Round 6
Saturday, 10 May Claremont 28.15 (183) def. Subiaco 14.11 (95) Claremont Oval (crowd: 5613)
Saturday, 10 May East Fremantle 16.16 (112) def. by Perth 22.11 (143) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7420)
Saturday, 10 May Swan Districts 27.20 (182) def. West Perth 8.8 (56) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 22350)
Saturday, 10 May East Perth 21.12 (138) def. South Fremantle 18.8 (116) Perth Oval (crowd: 10857)
  • In front of the biggest-ever crowd at Bassendean and Swans’ biggest home-and-away attendance at any venue,[19] Swan Districts become the second team after West Perth in 1941 to win consecutive matches by over 100 points.[20]
  • An all-in-brawl leads to four reports for Subiaco half-forward Frank Bucknall[21] who gets six matches on one of the busiest nights for the WAFL Tribunal with seven players on report.[22]

Round 7[edit]

Round 7
Saturday, 17 May West Perth 13.21 (99) def. by East Perth 12.14 (86) Leederville Oval (crowd: 14860)
Saturday, 17 May Perth 20.12 (132) def. by Claremont 29.17 (191) Lathlain Park (crowd: 9693)
Saturday, 17 May South Fremantle 15.18 (108) def. by Swan Districts 22.15 (147) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 19279)
Saturday, 17 May Subiaco 20.25 (145) def. East Fremantle 9.13 (67) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4658)

In winning their first match, Subiaco record their biggest win against the reigning premier club until 1993, beating 76 points from 1968[23][a] They do this despite losing spearhead Peter Munro after kicking five in the first quarter and then Gary Buckenara.[24]

Round 8[edit]

Round 8
Saturday, 24 May East Perth 19.20 (134) def. Claremont 14.13 (97) Perth Oval (crowd: 12596)
Saturday, 24 May West Perth 22.18 (150) def. Subiaco 15.13 (103) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8103) [25]
Saturday, 24 May Perth 19.17 (131) def. by South Fremantle 21.25 (151) Lathlain Park (crowd: 8566) [26]
Saturday, 24 May East Fremantle 15.16 (106) def. by Swan Districts 29.17 (191) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 8348)
  • After being fifteen points behind at quarter-time, Swan Districts produce a devastating second half to stay unbeaten with a percentage of 179.41, as East Fremantle apply virtually no pressure.[27]
  • The aggregate of 204 points in the second half – Swan Districts 22.8 (140) and East Fremantle 10.4 (64) – constitutes a record for any half of WA(N)FL football.[28]

Round 9 (Foundation Day)[edit]

Round 9
Saturday, 31 May Perth 16.18 (114) def. by Swan Districts 19.17 (131) Lathlain Park (crowd: 11316)
Saturday, 31 May East Perth 28.11 (179) def. Subiaco 12.20 (92) Perth Oval (crowd: 6680)
Monday, 2 June Claremont 18.15 (123) def. West Perth 7.10 (52) Claremont Oval (crowd: 13479) [29]
Monday, 2 June South Fremantle 14.21 (105) def. by East Fremantle 16.17 (113) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 12487)

The presence of the injured Peake and a return to form by their small men gives East Fremantle a desire completely lacking in other games of 1980 and allows them to overpower their Fremantle rivals in a hard-running game – producing unfulfilled hopes of a revival.[30]

Round 10[edit]

Round 10
Saturday, 7 June South Fremantle 18.16 (124) def. West Perth 12.22 (94) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 10976) [31]
Saturday, 7 June Swan Districts 16.21 (117) def. East Perth 12.12 (84) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 19237)
Saturday, 7 June Claremont 24.18 (162) def. East Fremantle 15.15 (105) Claremont Oval (crowd: 9016)
Saturday, 7 June Subiaco 13.17 (95) def. by Perth 16.17 (113) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4989)

11.6 (72) from Warren Ralph puts paid to hopes of a blue and white revival and reveals a new WAFL star, as the Tigers kick 12.4 (76) to 4.0 (24) after Old Easts drew to within five points early in the final quarter.[32]

Round 11[edit]

Round 11
Saturday, 14 June Subiaco 9.23 (77) def. by South Fremantle 16.19 (115) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4932) [33]
Saturday, 14 June Swan Districts 20.14 (134) def. Claremont 13.7 (85) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 12870)
Saturday, 14 June East Fremantle 16.14 (110) def. by East Perth 25.18 (168) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6028)
Saturday, 14 June West Perth 16.19 (115) def. Perth 10.17 (77) Leederville Oval (crowd: 7352)
  • Swan Districts win their sixteenth match in succession as former Sandover winner and six-goal ruck-rover Graham Melrose shows leadership qualities for a team depleted by interstate calls.[34]
  • Controversial West Perth ruckman Ben Jager proves he has improved beyond his formerly criticised disposal as he proves a worthy leader for a Cardinal team minus captain Fong and vice-captain Heal.[35]

Round 12[edit]

Round 12
Saturday, 21 June Claremont 3.4 (22) def. by South Fremantle 8.13 (61) Claremont Oval (crowd: 6716)
Saturday, 21 June East Perth 8.13 (61) def. by Perth 14.14 (98) Perth Oval (crowd: 5048)
Saturday, 21 June Swan Districts 7.12 (54) def. Subiaco 5.13 (43) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 6105)
Saturday, 21 June East Fremantle 7.8 (50) def. by West Perth 9.13 (67) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3860)
  • On a day where 45.4 millimetres (1.79 in) of rain fell in Perth,[36] Claremont’s normally powerful attack kick the lowest WAFL score between 1969 and 1994, with Phil Krakouer kicking 3.2 of the 3.4 after Claremont, against all advice, kicked into a strong wind on winning the toss and conceded 4.3 (27) in sixteen minutes when the ground remained dry.[37]
  • This also remains Claremont’s lowest score ever against the Bulldogs.[38]

Round 13[edit]

Round 13
Saturday, 28 June Subiaco 12.16 (88) def. by Claremont 29.20 (194) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6640)
Saturday, 28 June Perth 25.19 (169) def. East Fremantle 20.19 (139) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5926)
Saturday, 28 June West Perth 17.11 (113) def. by Swan Districts 16.19 (115) Leederville Oval (crowd: 15847)
Saturday, 28 June South Fremantle 24.18 (162) def. East Perth 10.14 (74) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 11526)
  • Swan Districts win their eighteenth consecutive match dating back to late 1979, the best opening to a WAFL season since East Perth won the first seventeen in 1959[39]
  • West Perth suffer the first of three heartbreaking losses for that cost them a finals berth, as Swans’ superb fighting qualities see them win after being behind all afternoon.[40]
  • Despite East Fremantle kicking 9.10 (64) in the final quarter, Perth’s wingers Cam Shepherd and Alan Johnson had inflicted too much damage for the reigning premiers.[41]

Round 14[edit]

Round 14
Saturday, 12 July East Perth 11.19 (85) def. West Perth 9.11 (65) Perth Oval (crowd: 6744)
Saturday, 12 July Claremont 18.15 (123) def. Perth 10.18 (78) Claremont Oval (crowd: 4945)
Saturday, 12 July Swan Districts 10.8 (68) def. by South Fremantle 11.21 (87) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 9791)
Saturday, 12 July East Fremantle 17.22 (124) def. Subiaco 9.12 (66) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 2830)

South Fremantle’s supremacy in the wet, with wingman Geoff O‘Brien and Maurice Rioli superb, virtually seals the top two and ends Swans’ hopes of an unbeaten season.[42]

Round 15[edit]

Round 15
Saturday, 19 July Claremont 19.14 (128) def. East Perth 12.6 (78) Claremont Oval (crowd: 12580)
Saturday, 19 July South Fremantle 20.20 (140) def. Perth 15.16 (106) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 8258)
Saturday, 19 July Subiaco 13.9 (87) def. West Perth 13.8 (86) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4795)
Saturday, 19 July Swan Districts 19.18 (132) def. East Fremantle 17.11 (113) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 9972)

Subiaco gain their second and last win in a game with no score for twenty minutes in the last quarter - remarkable in such a high-scoring era in fine, if windy, weather.[43]

Round 16[edit]

Round 16
Saturday, 26 July West Perth 13.14 (92) def. by South Fremantle 13.15 (93) Leederville Oval (crowd: 7979)
Saturday, 26 July East Perth 19.11 (125) def. Swan Districts 6.13 (49) Perth Oval (crowd: 8182)
Saturday, 26 July Perth 25.17 (167) def. Subiaco 9.8 (62) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3061)
Saturday, 26 July East Fremantle 10.9 (69) def. by Claremont 11.12 (78) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4946)

Despite a stirring fightback after losing Adamson, Ellen and Logan before the game, West Perth lose by one point for the second successive match and East Perth move within a narrow percentage gap of claiming their place in the four.[44]

Round 17[edit]

Round 17
Saturday, 2 August Swan Districts 20.20 (140) def. Perth 12.14 (86) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 9877)
Saturday, 2 August Subiaco 13.10 (88) def. by East Perth 21.23 (149) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5138)
Saturday, 2 August West Perth 16.15 (111) def. by Claremont 20.22 (142) Leederville Oval (crowd: 12117)
Saturday, 2 August East Fremantle 18.10 (118) def. by South Fremantle 21.22 (148) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 10880)

A return to form with 7.6 (48) by Warren Ralph – who had been hopeless in the wet – and the dominance of Moss and Hunter ensure Claremont of a win that puts West Perth out of the four for the first time during 1980.[45]

Round 18[edit]

Round 18
Saturday, 9 August South Fremantle 17.21 (123) def. Subiaco 7.14 (56) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6016)
Saturday, 9 August Perth 13.19 (97) def. by West Perth 17.17 (119) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5222)
Saturday, 9 August Claremont 11.12 (78) def. by Swan Districts 14.19 (103) Claremont Oval (crowd: 9961)
Saturday, 9 August East Perth 27.10 (172) def. East Fremantle 13.16 (94) Perth Oval (crowd: 5612)

Despite having Moss, Jim and Phil Krakouer and Ralph all well held, Claremont are only one point behind early in the last quarter before Swans show their ability under pressure and win well.[46]

Round 19[edit]

Round 19
Saturday, 16 August Subiaco 19.17 (131) def. by Swan Districts 26.14 (170) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5027)
Saturday, 16 August Perth 10.9 (69) def. by East Perth 22.13 (145) Lathlain Park (crowd: 6817)
Saturday, 16 August South Fremantle 17.16 (118) def. Claremont 17.12 (114) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 13138)
Saturday, 16 August West Perth 21.25 (151) def. East Fremantle 11.13 (79) Leederville Oval (crowd: 9034)
  • With Alan Watling kicking an equal career-best seven goals in this 250th match, West Perth run over hapless East Fremantle with 10.7 (67) to 2.3 (15) in the third quarter, but poor second and final quarters question their finals hopes in critics’ eyes.[47]
  • Subiaco, after being 86 points behind at half-time, kick 17.8 (110) to 10.3 (63) in the second half to reveal a question mark upon most of their football during 1980. Despite playing most of the second half at centre-half-forward with Stan Nowotny at full-forward, Simon Beasley kicks nine for Swans.[48]

Round 20[edit]

Round 20
Saturday, 23 August Swan Districts 21.16 (142) def. West Perth 14.15 (99) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 12873)
Saturday, 23 August East Perth 22.5 (137) def. by South Fremantle 21.15 (141) Perth Oval (crowd: 14565)
Saturday, 23 August Claremont 27.16 (178) def. Subiaco 13.13 (91) Claremont Oval (crowd: 5462)
Saturday, 23 August East Fremantle 25.13 (163) def. Perth 22.14 (146) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4010)
  • Don Haddow, the last remaining player from South’s 1970 premiership team, kick 7.4 (46) and leads well to fill the unfamiliar role of full-forward that had caused the Bulldogs trouble.[49]
  • East Perth made a late charge from 41 points behind, led by Paul Arnold, that fails owing to weaknesses on the flanks and young ruckman Ironmonger’s immobility around the ground.
  • With Ralph equaling his best performance of 11.6 (72) and Phil Krakouer unstoppable with his superb disposal, Claremont kick 18.9 (117) to 5.2 (32) after a promising first half by the Lions.[50]

Round 21[edit]

Round 21
Saturday, 30 August South Fremantle 18.14 (122) def. Swan Districts 10.16 (76) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 15980)
Saturday, 30 August West Perth 20.16 (136) def. East Perth 17.4 (106) Leederville Oval (crowd: 14427)
Saturday, 30 August Perth 15.12 (102) def. by Claremont 18.18 (126) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5807)
Saturday, 30 August Subiaco 18.13 (121) def. by East Fremantle 19.33 (147) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3412)
  • West Perth produce a superb team effort that sees the in the four early in the last quarter before several goals from Murray Couper reduce the margin and re-establish East Perth’s place.[51]
  • East Fremantle equal the second highest number of behinds in a senior WAFL match[52]
  • Subiaco’s colts kicked the embarrassing score of 1.16 (22), but scored 12.7 (79) against the same opponent the following weekend.

Ladder[edit]

1980 WAFL Ladder
TEAM P W L D PF PA % PTS
1 Swan Districts 21 18 3 0 2764 2023 136.63 72
2 South Fremantle (P) 21 17 4 0 2674 2085 128.25 68
3 Claremont 21 13 8 0 2613 2194 119.10 52
4 East Perth 21 11 10 0 2501 2224 112.46 44
5 West Perth 21 11 10 0 2319 2104 110.22 44
6 Perth 21 7 14 0 2462 2691 91.49 28
7 East Fremantle 21 5 16 0 2161 2948 73.30 20
8 Subiaco 21 2 19 0 1790 3015 59.37 8
Key: P = Played, W = Won, L = Lost, D = Drawn, PF = Points For, PA = Points Against

Finals[edit]

First Semi Final[edit]

First Semi-Final
Saturday, 6 September Claremont 15.10 (100) def. by East Perth 19.18 (132) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 30,184)

Despite the loss of decorated centreman Phil Kelly, Steve Curtis’ blanketing of Phil Krakouer after the first fifteen minutes and the dominance of key forward Paul Arnold and Grant Campbell gives East Perth a clear win.[53]

Second Semi Final[edit]

Second Semi-Final
Saturday, 13 September Swan Districts 11.12 (78) def. by South Fremantle 11.22 (88) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 34,575)

In a fiery match, South Fremantle show they remained Western Australia’s wet-weather specialists by keeping Swan Districts to 2.9 (21) after half-time as rain began and the pressure intensified.[54]

Preliminary final[edit]

Preliminary Final
Saturday, 20 September Swan Districts 28.13 (181) def. East Perth 15.15 (105) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 34,193)
  • Record attendance for a WA(N)FL Preliminary Final[55]
  • Swans beat Subiaco’s 1959 record for the highest score in a WA(N)FL final by two points, showing the gap between the top two and the rest. East Perth cannot counter the centreline of Keith and Phil Narkle and Mike Smith, nor Graham Melrose and Beasley who finish with 16.1 between them.[56]

Grand final[edit]

1980 WAFL Grand Final
Saturday, 27 September South Fremantle def. Swan Districts Subiaco Oval (crowd: 46,208)
3.6 (24)
11.13 (79)
17.16 (118)
 23.18 (156)
Q1
Q2
Q3
 Final
2.2 (14)
3.7 (25)
8.7 (55)
 15.8 (98)
Simpson Medal: Maurice Rioli (South Fremantle)
Carter 4, Hardie 3, Outhwaite 3, Vigona 3, Morley 2, Shaw 2, Michael 2, Rioli 2, O‘Brien, Campbell Delmenico Goals Richardson 3, Neesham 2, Hoyer 2, Solin 2, Beasley 2, Holmes 2, Holden, Phil Narkle
Rioli, Carter, McKay, Michael, Vigona, Delmenico Best Neesham, Boucher, Skwirowski, Gillespie, Solin, Richardson

South Fremantle, on a winning streak dating back to Round 10, give what is often regarded as the finest display in any WAFL Grand Final to thrash Swan Districts, playing in their first Grand Final since 1965.

Notes[edit]

a The game when Austin Robertson kicked 15.11 (101).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b See Hopkins, Colin; ‘Swans Live Up to Their Promise’; The West Australian, 8 April 1980, p. 87
  2. ^ a b Carew-Reid, Andrew; ‘East Fremantle Throw Off the Blues’; The West Australian, 28 April 1980, p. 78
  3. ^ See Spillman, Ken; Diehards: the Story of the Subiaco Football Club 1946-2000, p. 199; ISBN 0-9578185-0-5
  4. ^ See Christian, Geoff; ‘Claremont Lose Their Wingmen’, The West Australian, 23 June 1980; pp. 65, 68
  5. ^ Bird, Frank; ‘Percy’s Carlton Crushed’; The Age, 17 March 1980, p. 38
  6. ^ Rodgers, Stephen (compiler); The Complete Book of VFL Records; pp. 223-227. ISBN 1862528020
  7. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Brown’s Gamble Pays Off’; The West Australian, 7 April 1980, p. 70
  8. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: East Fremantle – Game Records
  9. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘New-Look Swans Survive Crises’; The West Australian, 14 April 1980, p. 68
  10. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Peake’s Talent Wasted at Centre Half-Forward’; The West Australian, 14 April 1980, p. 67
  11. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Defenders Save Face for Drab East Perth’; The West Australian, 21 April 1980, p. 63
  12. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South Reveal Star Quality’; The West Australian, 21 April 1980, p. 76
  13. ^ Sheterline, John; ‘West Perth Mean Business’; The West Australian, 21 April 1980, p. 76
  14. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘All’s Not Lost for Subiaco’; The West Australian, 28 April 1980; p. 63
  15. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Claremont Flaws Come to Surface’; The West Australian, 28 April 1980; p. 62
  16. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Draws Archived 2014-05-13 at the Wayback Machine.
  17. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘1979 Flops on the Top’; The West Australian, 5 May 1980; pp. 90, 96
  18. ^ Swan Districts: Most Behinds
  19. ^ Swan Districts: Biggest Home-and-Away Crowds
  20. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Consecutive Wins by 100 Points
  21. ^ ‘Reports Come after Brawl’; The West Australian, 12 May 1980; p. 66
  22. ^ ‘Bucknall Penalised for Six Dates’; The West Australian, 13 May 1980; pp. 79, 80
  23. ^ Subiaco: Biggest Wins
  24. ^ ‘Lions Find Their Roar’; The West Australian, 19 May 1980, p. 55
  25. ^ ‘Long Kicks Boost W.P.’; The West Australian, 26 May 1980, p. 67
  26. ^ ‘Souths End Run of Losses’; The West Australian, 26 May 1980, pp. 68, 67
  27. ^ ‘Swans March Home with 22-goal Half’; The West Australian, 26 May 1980, p. 67
  28. ^ WAFL Footy Facts – Most Combined Points in Second Half
  29. ^ “A Special Writer” (anonymous author); ‘Claremont Crush West Perth’; The West Australian, 3 June 1980, p. 75
  30. ^ ‘E. F‘Tle Give Their Best in Derby’; The West Australian, 3 June 1980, p. 76
  31. ^ ‘Mal’s Move Pays Off’; The West Australian, 9 June 1980, p. 66
  32. ^ ‘Old Easts a Heap of Ruins’; The West Australian, 9 June 1980, p. 66
  33. ^ Sheterline, John; ‘Subiaco Lacks Discipline’; The West Australian, 16 June 1980, p. 58
  34. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Melrose Provides the Inspiration’; The West Australian, 16 June 1980; p. 74
  35. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Jager Proves Critics Wrong’; The West Australian, 16 June 1980; p. 75
  36. ^ Daily Rainfall for Perth Regional Office, June 1980
  37. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Rioli Bursts Back into Best Form’, The West Australian, 23 June 1980
  38. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Claremont v South Fremantle
  39. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Streaks
  40. ^ Sheterline, John; ‘Swans Pass Test of Character’; The West Australian, 30 June 1980, p. 60
  41. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Perth Wingers Show the Way’; The West Australian, 30 June 1980, p. 61
  42. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Bring on the Rain Is South’s Cry’; The West Australian, 14 July 1980, p. 68
  43. ^ Hopkins, Colin, ‘Reward for Perseverance’; The West Australian, 21 July 1980; p. 69
  44. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Shaw Gains Status as a Defender’; The West Australian, 28 July 1980, p. 72
  45. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Claremont Shatter West Perth’s Hopes’; The West Australian, 4 August 1980; p. 70
  46. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Swans Are at Their Best under Pressure’; The West Australian, 11 August 1980, p. 66
  47. ^ Sheterline, John; ‘West Perth Must Sustain Pressure’; The West Australian, 18 August 1980, p. 74
  48. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘There’s a Glimmer of Hope for Subiaco’; The West Australian, 18 August 1980, p. 75
  49. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Haddow Looks the Answer in Attack’; The West Australian, 25 August 1980, p. 96
  50. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘Melville Will Be Hand in Finals’; The West Australian, 25 August 1980, p. 96
  51. ^ Hopkins, Colin; ‘West Perth Take All the Glory’; The West Australian, 1 September 1980, p. 67
  52. ^ East Fremantle: Most Behinds
  53. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘East Perth Are on Target’; The West Australian, 8 September 1980; p. 72
  54. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Now or Never for South, Says Brown’; The West Australian, 15 September 1980, p. 67
  55. ^ Devaney, John; Full Points Footy’s WA Football Companion; p. 12. ISBN 978-0-9556897-1-0
  56. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘East Perth Were Always Lagging’; The West Australian; 22 September 1980, p. 67

External links[edit]