198 Ampella

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198 Ampella
Discovery
Discovered by A. Borrelly, 1879
Discovery date 13 June 1879
Designations
MPC designation (198) Ampella
Pronunciation /æmˈpɛlə/
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 131.26 yr (47944 d)
Aphelion 3.0193 AU (451.68 Gm)
Perihelion 1.8986 AU (284.03 Gm)
2.4589 AU (367.85 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.22788
3.86 yr (1408.4 d)
131.10°
0° 15m 20.196s / day
Inclination 9.3113°
268.45°
88.586°
Earth MOID 0.921007 AU (137.7807 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.52287 AU (377.416 Gm)
TJupiter 3.437
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
28.58±1.4 km
10.379 h (0.4325 d)
0.2517±0.027
S
8.33

198 Ampella is a Main belt asteroid that was discovered by Alphonse Borrelly on June 13, 1879. The name seems to be the feminine form of Ampelos, a satyr and good friend of Dionysus in Greek mythology. It could also derive from the Ampelose (plural of Ampelos), a variety of hamadryad, it is an S-type asteroid.

So far Ampella has been observed occulting a star once, on November 8, 1991, from New South Wales, Australia.

This asteroid has been resolved by the W. M. Keck Observatory, resulting in a size estimate of 53 km. It is oblate in shape, with a size ratio of 1.22 between the major and minor axes. Measurements from the IRAS observatory gave a similar size estimate of 57 km. Photometric measurements made in 1993 give a rotation period of 10.38 hours.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "198 Ampella". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Marchis, F.; et al. (November 2006), "Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids. I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey", Icarus, 185 (1), pp. 39–63, Bibcode:2006Icar..185...39M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.06.001, PMC 2600456Freely accessible, PMID 19081813. 

External links[edit]