2008 ST291

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2008 ST291
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. E. Schwamb
M. E. Brown
D. L. Rabinowitz
Discovery date September 24, 2008
Designations
MPC designation 2008 ST291
TNO (SDO)[2][3]
6:1?[3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc 3286 days (9.00 yr)
Aphelion 156.396 AU (23.3965 Tm)
Perihelion 42.271 AU (6.3237 Tm)
99.333 AU (14.8600 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.57445
990.04 yr (361611 d)
23.2101°
0.0009955°/day
Inclination 20.7849°
331.0475°
324.3727°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 612 km (est. at 0.09)[5]
370–820 km (generic)[6]
22.3[1][7]
4.2[4]

2008 ST291, also written as 2008 ST291, is a trans-Neptunian object with an absolute magnitude of 4.2,[4] making it possibly a dwarf planet.[8] It is located near the 1:6 Neptune resonance of 99.4 AU (compared to its 99.3 ± 0.2 AU), meaning that it completes roughly 1 orbit for every 6 orbits Neptune makes.[3]

Size estimate[edit]

2008 ST291 is estimated to be about 612 kilometres (380 mi) in diameter, assuming a typical albedo of 0.09 for trans-Neptunian objects.[5] However, because its albedo is unknown and it has an absolute magnitude of 4.2,[4] it could be anywhere between 370 and 820 km in diameter.[6]

Distance[edit]

Orbit comparison of 2008 ST291, Pluto and Neptune

2008 ST291, currently 60.9 AU from the Sun,[7] came to perihelion in 1954.[4] It takes almost one thousand years to orbit the Sun.

2008 ST291 has only been observed 28 times over four oppositions and has an orbit quality of 4 (0 being best; 9 being worst).[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2009-V68 : 2008 ST291". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2009-11-14. Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  2. ^ "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  3. ^ a b c Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 08ST291" (last observation: 2010-10-09 using 20 of 23 observations over 2.04 years). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2008 ST291)" (last observation: 2017-09-23; arc: 9.00 years). Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  5. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Archived from the original on 10 December 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-09. 
  6. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 26 November 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  7. ^ a b "AstDyS 2008 ST291 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  8. ^ "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". Gps.caltech.edu. 2015-07-21. Retrieved 20 September 2016. 
  9. ^ a b "AstDyS-2, Asteroids - Dynamic Site". Retrieved 2018-04-03. Objects with distance from Sun over 59 AU 
  10. ^ Astronomer Michele Bannister (29 Mar 2018)

External links[edit]