2010 RF43

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2010 RF43
Discovery [2]
Discovery site La Silla Obs.
Discovery date 6 September 2010[1]
Designations
MPC designation 2010 RF43
TNO[3], SDO[4]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 5
Observation arc 743 days (2.03 yr)
Aphelion 61.726 AU (9.2341 Tm)
Perihelion 36.853 AU (5.5131 Tm)
49.290 AU (7.3737 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.25231
346.05 yr (126396 d)
94.491°
0° 0m 10.254s /day
Inclination 30.698°
25.208°
191.70°
Known satellites none
Earth MOID 35.8518 AU (5.36335 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 31.4497 AU (4.70481 Tm)
Proper orbital elements
Precession of the ascending node
24.527[citation needed] arcsec / yr
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 380–860[5]
581 km in diameter.[6]
3.7

2010 RF43 is a trans-Neptunian object of the scattered disc orbiting in the outermost regions of the Solar System, approximately 600 kilometers in diameter. With an absolute magnitude of 3.7, it was first observed on 9 September 2010, by astronomers at the La Silla Observatory in northern Chile.[3][2] [4] Astronomer Mike Brown lists it as highly likely a dwarf planet.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (2010 RF43). "Small Solar System Body (2010 RF43)". Comets-asteroids.findthedata.org. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  2. ^ a b "MPEC 2011-U09 : 2010 RF43". Minorplanetcenter.net. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  3. ^ a b c Alan Chamberlin. "JPL Small-Body Database Browser". Ssd.jpl.nasa.gov. Retrieved 31 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 10RF43" (2013-02-13 using 34 of 36 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2013-02-13. 
  5. ^ "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA / JPL. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 
  6. ^ a b "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". Gps.caltech.edu. 2013-11-01. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 

External links[edit]