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2011 Nepal census

Nepal conducted a widespread national census in 2011 by the Nepal Central Bureau of Statistics. Working with the 58 municipalities and the 3915 Village Development Committees at a district level, they recorded data from all the municipalities and villages of each district; the data included statistics on population size, households and age distribution, place of birth, residence characteristics, marital status, language spoken, caste/ethnic group, economically active population, number of children, employment status, occupation. Total population in 2011: 26,494,504 Increase since last census 2001: 3,343,081 Annual population growth rate: 1.35 Number of households: 5,427,302 Average Household Size: 4.88 Population in Mountain: 6.73%, Hill: 43.00% and Terai: 50.27%. The population wise ranking of 126 Nepalese castes/ethnic groups as per 2011 Nepal census. List of village development committees of Nepal 1991 Nepal census 2001 Nepal census Central Bureau of Statistics National Population and Housing Census 2011

SpywareBlaster

SpywareBlaster is an antispyware and antiadware program for Microsoft Windows designed to block the installation of ActiveX malware. SpywareBlaster prevents the download and execution of most spyware, browser hijackers and other malicious programs based on ActiveX. SpywareBlaster works on the basis of "blacklists" Clsid of known malware programs preventing them from infecting the protected computer; this approach differs from many other anti-spyware programs, which offer the user a chance to scan the hard drive and computer memory to remove unwanted software after it has been installed. SpywareBlaster allows the user to prevent privacy risks such as tracking cookies. Another feature is the ability to restrict the actions of websites known as distributors of adware and spyware. SpywareBlaster supports several web browsers, including Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome. SpywareBlaster is distributed as freeware, for non-commercial users. Ad-Aware Spybot - Search & Destroy Official site

Haileyville, Oklahoma

Haileyville is a city in Pittsburg County, United States. The population was 813 at the 2010 census. Located in Pittsburg County, Haileyville lies at the junction of U. S. Route 270/State Highway 1 and State Highway 63, fourteen miles east of McAlester and a little more than one mile west of Hartshorne; the French explorer Jean Baptiste Bénard de La Harpe first mapped the site of Haileyville in 1719 during his expedition to the Arkansas River. In 1898 D. M. Hailey, M. D. established the town of Haileyville, when he claimed a tract of land east of McAlester and opened the area's first coal mines. A confederate veteran, Hailey had first moved into Indian Territory in 1868 to practice medicine and before long had become involved in several business ventures, his mining investments began when he and James Elliot started the Hailey-Ola Mining Company, leasing coal land from the Choctaw and Gulf Railroad, which laid tracks in the area in 1889-90. The first mine, named Number One Slope, began production on St. Patrick's Day in 1899.

Haileyville, in the Choctaw Nation, was a company town, a common feature of coal-mining communities. Italians, American Indians and Americans comprised most of Haileyville, many worked in the mines or on the railroads. Coal from the area was only profitable due to the railroad junction; the town was home to the freight and passenger offices of the Choctaw and Gulf Railroad, which became the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway Company. By 1902 the railroad had 1,052 miles of track, including a branch from the town. Haileyville remained the division point of the Rock Island Railroad until 1958, when the offices moved to El Reno. On April 20, 1901, the U. S. Post Office Department designated a Haileyville post office; the 1907 population stood at 1,452, it climbed to 2,024 in 1910. In 1911 a bank, the New State newspaper, five hotels, three doctors, several retail and other businesses served the residents; the community and its close neighbor, are known as the "twin cities" of Pittsburg County due to their proximity.

Governor Lee Cruce proclaimed Haileyville a first class city on February 12, 1912. After a 2,067 population in 1920, the number of residents declined to 1,801 in 1930, 1,183 in 1940, 922 in 1960. In 1946 one coal company, a bank, an ice plant were the main businesses, with gas stations, grocery stores, a hardware store. After the coal mines closed, lumber and ranching became the primary modes of production. Haileyville is located at 34°51′14″N 95°34′44″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.0 square mile, all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 891 people, 375 households, 253 families residing in the city; the population density was 872.8 people per square mile. There were 452 housing units at an average density of 442.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 69.81% White, 0.67% African American, 21.89% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 0.56% from other races, 6.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.24% of the population.

There were 375 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.3% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.8% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.96. In the city, the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males. The median income for a household in the city was $26,833, the median income for a family was $29,600. Males had a median income of $29,688 versus $22,500 for females; the per capita income for the city was $13,326. About 14.8% of families and 17.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.4% of those under age 18 and 15.4% of those age 65 or over.

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture - Haileyville

Universal Robotics

Universal Logic, Inc. Universal Robotics, Inc. is an artificial intelligence software engineering and robotics integration company headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. The company offers supply chains complete material handling systems for high-mix, high-volume applications; the systems integrate artificial intelligence with vision and motion control to give machines flexibility at high speed. Founded in 2008, the company specializes in complex or chaotic processes not automated; the technology was funded by DARPA and NASA, was co-developed through a 7-year partnership between NASA and Vanderbilt University and is employed in NASA's Robonaut. In 2015, the company received its first million-dollar contract. Universal Robotics was founded and is led by David Peters, CEO and his brother Dr. Alan Peters, CTO. Dr. Peters is the principal architect of Neocortex and is an Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. Hob Wubbena is the company's Vice President of Strategic Marketing.

Universal Robotics

Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front

The Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front is a political organisation active in both Pakistan-administered and Indian-administered Kashmir. It was founded by Amanullah Khan, with Maqbool Bhat credited as a co-founder. A militant wing of the Plebiscite Front, it changed its name to JKLF in Birmingham, England on 29 May 1977. From until 1994 it was an active militant organisation, it first established branches in several cities and towns of the UK, other countries of Europe, United States and Middle East. In 1982, it established a branch in Pakistan-administered Azad Kashmir. After 1994, the JKLF in Kashmir Valley, under the leadership of Yasin Malik, declared an'indefinite ceasefire' and disbanded its military wing, it committed itself to a political struggle for achieving its objective of independence for the entire region of the former princely state. The JKLF branch in Azad Kashmir did not agree with this change of direction and split off from the JKLF in the Valley. In 2005, the two groups merged again retaining the original identity.

Though the JKLF has only Muslim members, it is notionally secular. It continues to assert that a secular, independent Kashmir free of both India and Pakistan is its eventual goal. Despite having received weapons and training from Pakistani military, it regards Pakistan as an'occupation power' and carries out political struggle against it in Azad Kashmir; the JKLF in the Kashmir Valley was banned by Indian government under anti-terror law in March 2019. JKLF was founded by Amanullah Khan in Birmingham in June 1976 from the erstwhile UK chapter of the'Plebiscite Front'. Maqbool Bhat is credited as being its co-founder. Khan was born in Gilgit, studied in Srinagar and emigrated to Pakistan in 1952. Bhat was born in Kupwara and emigrated to Pakistan after studying in Srinagar; the duo had earlier formed Jammu Kashmir National Liberation Front in the late 1960s, along with Hashim Qureshi. The group carried out the hijacking of Ganga, an Indian Airlines plane flying from Srinagar to Jammu, in January 1971, diverted it to Lahore.

The Pakistan government returned all the passengers and crew to India, subsequently tried the hijackers and several members of NLF on charges of being Indian agents. Khan was imprisoned in a Gilgit prison during 1970 -- 72, released. Maqbool Bhat was released in 1974, he crossed over into the Indian-administered Kashmir where he was arrested in a bank robbery. Amanullah Khan moved to England, where he received the enthusiastic support of the British Mirpuri community; the UK chapter of the Plebiscite Front was converted into the Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front in May 1977. It formed an armed wing called the'National Liberation Army'. Amanullah Khan took charge as the General Secretary of JKLF the following February. With the active support of the British Mirpuris, the group expanded setting up branches in Pakistan, Holland, France, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and the United States, it organised well-attended conventions in Luton. In 1979, the JKLF planned to disrupt the international cricket match being played in Srinagar.

The visiting Australian team was guarded with high security and no untoward incidents occurred. Praveen Swami states that the JKLF made plans to bomb the March 1983 conference of non-aligned meeting in New Delhi and to hijack an airliner from New Delhi, both of which were aborted. After the arrival of Hashim Qureshi in the UK in January 1984, another hijacking was planned. However, on 3 February 1984, members of the National Liberation Army kidnapped the Indian diplomat Ravindra Mhatre in Birmingham and demanded the release of Maqbool Bhat as ransom. Amanullah Khan was named as the interlocuter; the kidnappers panicked at the possibility of a police raid and upon Amanullah Khan's instructions, shot the diplomat. India executed Maqbool Bhat six days turning him into a martyr and giving JKLF the visibility it lacked earlier. A British court convicted two members of the JKLF for the killing of Mhatre. Hashim Quresi and Amanullah Khan were expelled from the UK. Amanullah Khan and Hashim Qureshi returned to Pakistan in 1984, establishing the JKLF headquarters at Muzaffarabad.

Pakistan under Zia ul-Haq, supporting the Khalistani militants in Punjab, was ready to support an insurgency in Kashmir, Khan was ready to work with the Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence. Hashim Qureshi, on the other hand and went into exile in Holland. JKLF started political planning and continued till the end of 1987. Following the rigged state election in Jammu and Kashmir in 1987, the disaffected youth of the Kashmir Valley started crossing the Line of Control to Azad Kashmir to obtain arms and training. Khan's JKLF was their natural destination. Scholar Paul Staniland states that the JKLF was "reborn" in the Indian-controlled Kashmir in this period, it was led by young activists from Srinagar and environs, who crossed into Azad Kashmir for arms and training and returned to Srinagar. Yasin Malik, along with Hamid Sheikh, Ashfaq Wani and Javed Ahmad Mir, formed the core group — dubbed the "HAJY" group — of the JKLF militants in the Kashmir Valley; the enormity of popular support received for their call for independence surprised them.

Within two years, the JKLF in the Valley emerged as the "vanguard and spearhead of a popular uprising" against the Indian state. The JKLF waged a guerrilla war with the Indian security forces, kidnapping of Rubiya Sayeed, the daughter of Indian Home Minister, targeting attacks on the government and security officials. In March 1990, Ashfaq Wani was killed in a battle with Indian security forces. In August 1990

Henrietta, Missouri

Henrietta is a city in Ray County and part of the Kansas City metropolitan area within the United States. The population was 369 at the 2010 census. Henrietta was platted in 1868, named after Henrietta Watkins, the wife of a first settler. A variant name was "Henry". A post office called Henry was established in 1869, the name was changed to Henrietta in 1908. Henrietta is located at 39°14′10″N 93°56′10″W, in Ray County. Henrietta is 27 miles east of Independence and 35 miles east of Kansas City. Henrietta is part of the Kansas City metropolitan area. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.60 square miles, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 369 people, 109 households, 75 families living in the city; the population density was 615.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 141 housing units at an average density of 235.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 93.5% White, 5.4% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.3% from other races, 0.3% from two or more races.

Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.6% of the population. There were 109 households of which 34.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 17.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 8.3% had a male householder with no wife present, 31.2% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.03. The median age in the city was 37.1 years. 21.4% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 44.2 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 457 people, 124 households, 83 families living in the city; the population density was 765.0 people per square mile. There were 149 housing units at an average density of 249.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 88.62% White, 7.00% African American, 0.66% Native American, 2.19% from other races, 1.53% from two or more races.

Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.28% of the population. There were 124 households out of which 35.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.6% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.3% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.30. In the city the population was spread out with 21.4% under the age of 18, 16.0% from 18 to 24, 37.0% from 25 to 44, 16.4% from 45 to 64, 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 153.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 182.7 males. The median income for a household in the city was $33,750, the median income for a family was $40,357. Males had a median income of $29,432 versus $24,500 for females; the per capita income for the city was $16,129. About 6.0% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over