2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

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2018 NCAA Division I
Men's Basketball Tournament
2018 NCAA Men's Final Four logo.svg
Season 2017–18
Teams 68
Finals site Alamodome
San Antonio, Texas
Champions Villanova Wildcats (3rd title, 4th title game,
6th Final Four)
Runner-up Michigan Wolverines (7th title game,
8th Final Four)
Semifinalists
Winning coach Jay Wright (2nd title)
MOP Donte DiVincenzo (Villanova)
NCAA Division I Men's Tournaments
«2017 2019»

The 2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was a 68-team single-elimination tournament to determine the men's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball national champion for the 2017–18 season. The 80th edition of the tournament began on March 13, 2018, and concluded with the championship game on April 2 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

During the first round, UMBC became the first 16-seed to defeat a 1-seed in the men's tournament by defeating Virginia 74–54.[1][2] For the first time in tournament history, none of the four top seeded teams in a single region (the South) advanced to the Sweet 16. Also, the tournament featured the first regional final matchup of a 9-seed (Kansas State) and an 11-seed (Loyola-Chicago).

Villanova, Michigan, Kansas, and Loyola-Chicago, the “Cinderella team” of the tournament, reached the Final Four. Villanova defeated Michigan in the championship game, 79–62.

Tournament procedure[edit]

A total of 68 teams entered the 2018 tournament. 32 automatic bids were awarded, one to each program that won their conference tournament. The remaining 36 bids were "at-large", with selections extended by the NCAA Selection Committee.[citation needed]

Eight teams (the four lowest-seeded automatic qualifiers and the four lowest-seeded at-large teams) played in the First Four (the successor to what had been popularly known as "play-in games" through the 2010 tournament), the winners of these games advanced to the main draw of the tournament.[citation needed]

The Selection Committee seeded the entire field from 1 to 68.[citation needed]

2018 NCAA Tournament schedule and venues[edit]

2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament is located in the US
Dayton
Dayton
Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Charlotte
Charlotte
Wichita
Wichita
Boise
Boise
Detroit
Detroit
Nashville
Nashville
San Diego
San Diego
Dallas
Dallas
2018 First Four (orange) and first and second rounds (green)
2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament is located in the US
Atlanta
Atlanta
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Boston
Boston
Omaha
Omaha
San Antonio
San Antonio
2018 Regionals (blue) and Final Four (red)

The following sites were selected to host each round of the 2018 tournament:[3]

First Four

First and Second Rounds

Regional Semifinals and Finals (Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight)

National Semifinals and Championship (Final Four and Championship)

For the fourth time, the Alamodome and city of San Antonio are hosting the Final Four, this is the first tournament since 1994 in which no games were played in an NFL stadium, as the Alamodome is a college football stadium, although the Alamodome hosted some home games for the New Orleans Saints during their 2005 season. The 2018 tournament featured three new arenas in previous host cities. Philips Arena, the home of the Atlanta Hawks and replacement for the previously used Omni Coliseum, hosted the South regional games, and the new Little Caesars Arena, home of the Detroit Pistons and Detroit Red Wings, hosted games. And for the first time since 1994, the tournament returned to Wichita and the state of Kansas where Intrust Bank Arena hosted first round games.

The state of North Carolina was threatened with a 2018-2022 championship venue boycott by the NCAA, due to the HB2 law passed in 2016.[4] However, the law was repealed (but with provisos) days before the NCAA met to make decisions on venues in April 2017, at that time, the NCAA board of governors "reluctantly voted to allow consideration of championship bids in North Carolina by our committees that are presently meeting".[5] Therefore, Charlotte was eligible and served as a first weekend venue for the 2018 tournament.

Qualification and selection[edit]

Four teams, out of 351 in Division I, were ineligible to participate in the 2018 tournament due to failing to meet APR requirements: Alabama A&M, Grambling State, Savannah State, and Southeast Missouri State.[6] However, the NCAA granted the Savannah State Tigers a waiver which would have allowed the team to participate in the tournament, but the team failed to qualify.

Automatic qualifiers[edit]

The following 32 teams were automatic qualifiers for the 2018 NCAA field by virtue of winning their conference's automatic bid.[7]

Conference Team Record Appearance Last bid
America East UMBC 24–10 2nd 2008
American Cincinnati 30–4 32nd 2017
Atlantic 10 Davidson 21–11 14th 2015
ACC Virginia 31–2 22nd 2017
Atlantic Sun Lipscomb 23–9 1st Never
Big 12 Kansas 27–7 47th 2017
Big East Villanova 30–4 38th 2017
Big Sky Montana 26–7 11th 2013
Big South Radford 22–12 3rd 2009
Big Ten Michigan 28–7 28th 2017
Big West Cal State Fullerton 20–11 3rd 2008
CAA College of Charleston 26–7 5th 1999
Conference USA Marshall 24–10 6th 1987
Horizon League Wright State 25–9 3rd 2007
Ivy League Penn 24–8 24th 2007
MAAC Iona 20–13 13th 2017
MAC Buffalo 25–8 3rd 2016
MEAC North Carolina Central 19–15 3rd 2017
Missouri Valley Loyola–Chicago 28–5 6th 1985
Mountain West San Diego State 22–10 12th 2015
Northeast LIU Brooklyn 18–16 7th 2013
Ohio Valley Murray State 26–5 16th 2012
Pac-12 Arizona 27–7 35th 2017
Patriot League Bucknell 25–9 8th 2017
SEC Kentucky 24–10 58th 2017
Southern UNC Greensboro 27–7 3rd 2001
Southland Stephen F. Austin 28–6 5th 2016
SWAC Texas Southern 15–19 8th 2017
Summit League South Dakota State 28–6 5th 2017
Sun Belt Georgia State 24–10 4th 2015
West Coast Gonzaga 30–4 21st 2017
WAC New Mexico State 28–5 24th 2017

Tournament seeds[edit]

The tournament seeds were determined through the NCAA basketball tournament selection process. The seeds and regions were determined as follows:[8]

South Regional, Philips Arena, Atlanta, Georgia
Seed School Conference Record Berth type Overall rank
1 Virginia ACC 31–2 Auto 1
2 Cincinnati American 30–4 Auto 8
3 Tennessee SEC 25–8 At-large 10
4 Arizona Pac-12 27–7 Auto 16
5 Kentucky SEC 24–10 Auto 17
6 Miami (FL) ACC 22–9 At-large 22
7 Nevada Mountain West 27–7 At-large 27
8 Creighton Big East 21–11 At-large 30
9 Kansas State Big 12 22–11 At-large 34
10 Texas Big 12 19–14 At-large 39
11 Loyola–Chicago Missouri Valley 28–5 Auto 46
12 Davidson Atlantic 10 21–11 Auto 48
13 Buffalo MAC 26–8 Auto 51
14 Wright State Horizon 25–9 Auto 57
15 Georgia State Sun Belt 24–10 Auto 60
16 UMBC America East 24–10 Auto 63
West Regional, Staples Center, Los Angeles, California
Seed School Conference Record Berth type Overall rank
1 Xavier Big East 28–5 At-large 4
2 North Carolina ACC 25–10 At-large 5
3 Michigan Big Ten 28–7 Auto 11
4 Gonzaga WCC 30–4 Auto 15
5 Ohio State Big Ten 24–8 At-large 20
6 Houston American 26–7 At-large 23
7 Texas A&M SEC 20–12 At-large 25
8 Missouri SEC 20–12 At-large 32
9 Florida State ACC 20–11 At-large 33
10 Providence Big East 21–13 At-large 37
11 San Diego State Mountain West 22–10 Auto 45
12 South Dakota State Summit League 28–6 Auto 49
13 UNC Greensboro Southern 27–7 Auto 52
14 Montana Big Sky 26–7 Auto 56
15 Lipscomb Atlantic Sun 23–9 Auto 59
16* North Carolina Central MEAC 19–15 Auto 67
Texas Southern SWAC 15–19 Auto 68
East Regional, TD Garden, Boston, Massachusetts
Seed School Conference Record Berth type Overall rank
1 Villanova Big East 30–4 Auto 2
2 Purdue Big Ten 28–6 At-large 7
3 Texas Tech Big 12 24–9 At-large 12
4 Wichita State American 25–7 At-large 14
5 West Virginia Big 12 24–10 At-large 18
6 Florida SEC 20–12 At-large 21
7 Arkansas SEC 23–11 At-large 26
8 Virginia Tech ACC 21–11 At-large 31
9 Alabama SEC 19–15 At-large 36
10 Butler Big East 20–13 At-large 38
11* St. Bonaventure Atlantic 10 25–7 At-large 42
UCLA Pac-12 21–11 At-large 41
12 Murray State Ohio Valley 26–5 Auto 50
13 Marshall Conference USA 24–10 Auto 54
14 Stephen F. Austin Southland 28–6 Auto 58
15 Cal State Fullerton Big West 20–11 Auto 61
16* LIU Brooklyn NEC 18–16 Auto 66
Radford Big South 22–12 Auto 65
Midwest Regional, CenturyLink Center Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska
Seed School Conference Record Berth type Overall rank
1 Kansas Big 12 27–7 Auto 3
2 Duke ACC 26–7 At-large 6
3 Michigan State Big Ten 29–4 At-large 9
4 Auburn SEC 25–7 At-large 13
5 Clemson ACC 23–9 At-large 19
6 TCU Big 12 21–11 At-large 24
7 Rhode Island Atlantic 10 25–7 At-large 28
8 Seton Hall Big East 21–11 At-large 29
9 NC State ACC 21–11 At-large 35
10 Oklahoma Big 12 18–13 At-large 40
11* Arizona State Pac-12 20–11 At-large 43
Syracuse ACC 20–13 At-large 44
12 New Mexico State WAC 28–5 Auto 47
13 College of Charleston CAA 26–7 Auto 53
14 Bucknell Patriot 25–9 Auto 55
15 Iona MAAC 20–13 Auto 62
16 Penn Ivy League 24–8 Auto 64

*See First Four

The 2018 tournament was the first time since the 1978 tournament that the six Division I college basketball-playing schools based in the Washington, DC metropolitan areaAmerican, Georgetown, George Mason, George Washington, Howard, and Maryland – were collectively shut out of the NCAA Tournament.[9]

Regional brackets[edit]

All times are listed as Eastern Daylight Time (UTC−4)
* – Denotes overtime period

First Four – Dayton, Ohio[edit]

March 13 – East Region
     
16 LIU Brooklyn 61
16 Radford 71
March 13 – East Region
     
11 St. Bonaventure 65
11 UCLA 58
March 14 – West Region
     
16 Texas Southern 64
16 North Carolina Central 46
March 14 – Midwest Region
     
11 Syracuse 60
11 Arizona State 56

South Regional – Atlanta, Georgia[edit]

First Round
Round of 64
March 15–16
Second Round
Round of 32
March 17–18
Regional Semifinals
Sweet 16
March 22
Regional Final
Elite 8
March 24
                       
1 Virginia 54
16 UMBC 74
16 UMBC 43
Charlotte – Fri/Sun
9 Kansas State 50
8 Creighton 59
9 Kansas State 69
9 Kansas State 61
5 Kentucky 58
5 Kentucky 78
12 Davidson 73
5 Kentucky 95
Boise – Thu/Sat
13 Buffalo 75
4 Arizona 68
13 Buffalo 89
9 Kansas State 62
11 Loyola–Chicago 78
6 Miami (FL) 62
11 Loyola–Chicago 64
11 Loyola–Chicago 63
Dallas – Thu/Sat
3 Tennessee 62
3 Tennessee 73
14 Wright State 47
11 Loyola–Chicago 69
7 Nevada 68
7 Nevada 87*
10 Texas 83
7 Nevada 75
Nashville – Fri/Sun
2 Cincinnati 73
2 Cincinnati 68
15 Georgia State 53

South Regional Final[edit]

TBS
March 24
6:09 pm EDT
#11 Loyola–Chicago Ramblers 78, #9 Kansas State Wildcats 62
Scoring by half: 36–24, 42–38
Pts: B. Richardson – 23
Rebs: D. Ingram – 8
Asts: C. Custer – 5
Pts: X. Sneed – 16
Rebs: X. Sneed – 6
Asts: K. Stokes – 4
Philips Arena – Atlanta, GA
Attendance: 15,477
Referees: Gerry Pollard, Terry Wymer, Bert Smith

South Regional all tournament team[edit]

  • Ben Richardson (Sr, Loyola-Chicago) – South Regional most outstanding player[10]
  • Clayton Custer (Jr, Loyola-Chicago)[10]
  • Donte Ingram (Sr, Loyola-Chicago)[10]
  • Xavier Sneed (So, Kansas State)[10]
  • Barry Brown Jr. (Jr, Kansas State)[10]

West Regional – Los Angeles, California[edit]

First Round
Round of 64
March 15–16
Second Round
Round of 32
March 17–18
Regional Semifinals
Sweet 16
March 22
Regional Final
Elite 8
March 24
                       
1 Xavier 102
16 Texas Southern 83
1 Xavier 70
Nashville – Fri/Sun
9 Florida State 75
8 Missouri 54
9 Florida State 67
9 Florida State 75
4 Gonzaga 60
5 Ohio State 81
12 South Dakota State 73
5 Ohio State 84
Boise – Thu/Sat
4 Gonzaga 90
4 Gonzaga 68
13 UNC Greensboro 64
9 Florida State 54
3 Michigan 58
6 Houston 67
11 San Diego State 65
6 Houston 63
Wichita – Thu/Sat
3 Michigan 64
3 Michigan 61
14 Montana 47
3 Michigan 99
7 Texas A&M 72
7 Texas A&M 73
10 Providence 69
7 Texas A&M 86
Charlotte – Fri/Sun
2 North Carolina 65
2 North Carolina 84
15 Lipscomb 66

West Regional Final[edit]

TBS
March 24
5:49 pm PDT
#9 Florida State Seminoles 54, #3 Michigan Wolverines 58
Scoring by half: 26–27, 28–31
Pts: P. Cofer - 16
Rebs: P. Cofer - 11
Asts: B. Angola, T. Mann, T. Forrest - 2
Pts: C. Matthews – 17
Rebs: C. Matthews – 8
Asts: Z. Simpson – 5
Staples Center – Los Angeles, CA
Attendance: 19,665
Referees: Randy McCall, Keith Kimble, John Gaffney

West Regional all tournament team[edit]

East Regional – Boston, Massachusetts[edit]

First Round
Round of 64
March 15–16
Second Round
Round of 32
March 17–18
Regional Semifinals
Sweet 16
March 23
Regional Final
Elite 8
March 25
                       
1 Villanova 87
16 Radford 61
1 Villanova 81
Pittsburgh – Thu/Sat
9 Alabama 58
8 Virginia Tech 83
9 Alabama 86
1 Villanova 90
5 West Virginia 78
5 West Virginia 85
12 Murray State 68
5 West Virginia 94
San Diego – Fri/Sun
13 Marshall 71
4 Wichita State 75
13 Marshall 81
1 Villanova 71
3 Texas Tech 59
6 Florida 77
11 St. Bonaventure 62
6 Florida 66
Dallas – Thu/Sat
3 Texas Tech 69
3 Texas Tech 70
14 Stephen F. Austin 60
3 Texas Tech 78
2 Purdue 65
7 Arkansas 62
10 Butler 79
10 Butler 73
Detroit – Fri/Sun
2 Purdue 76
2 Purdue 74
15 Cal State Fullerton 48

East Regional Final[edit]

CBS
March 25
2:20 pm EDT
#3 Texas Tech Red Raiders 59, #1 Villanova Wildcats 71
Scoring by half: 23–36, 36–35
Pts: K. Evans – 12
Rebs: J. Gray – 9
Asts: K. Evans - 4
Pts: J. Brunson – 15
Rebs: E. Paschall – 14
Asts: J. Brunson – 4
TD Garden – Boston, MA
Attendance: 19,169
Referees: Terry Oglesby, Mike Reed, Michael Stephens

East Regional all tournament team[edit]

Midwest Regional – Omaha, Nebraska[edit]

First Round
Round of 64
March 15–16
Second Round
Round of 32
March 17–18
Regional Semifinals
Sweet 16
March 23
Regional Final
Elite 8
March 25
                       
1 Kansas 76
16 Penn 60
1 Kansas 83
Wichita – Thu/Sat
8 Seton Hall 79
8 Seton Hall 94
9 NC State 83
1 Kansas 80
5 Clemson 76
5 Clemson 79
12 New Mexico State 68
5 Clemson 84
San Diego – Fri/Sun
4 Auburn 53
4 Auburn 62
13 College of Charleston 58
1 Kansas 85*
2 Duke 81
6 TCU 52
11 Syracuse 57
11 Syracuse 55
Detroit – Fri/Sun
3 Michigan State 53
3 Michigan State 82
14 Bucknell 78
11 Syracuse 65
2 Duke 69
7 Rhode Island 83*
10 Oklahoma 78
7 Rhode Island 62
Pittsburgh – Thu/Sat
2 Duke 87
2 Duke 89
15 Iona 67

Midwest Regional Final[edit]

CBS
March 25
4:05 pm CDT
#2 Duke Blue Devils 81, #1 Kansas Jayhawks 85 (OT)
Scoring by half: 36–33, 36–39 Overtime: 9–13
Pts: T. Duval – 20
Rebs: M. Bagley III – 10
Asts: T. Duval – 6
Pts: M. Newman – 32
Rebs: S. Mykhailiuk, S. De Sousa – 10
Asts: D. Graham - 6
CenturyLink Center Omaha – Omaha, NE
Attendance: 17,579
Referees: Roger Ayers, Doug Sirmons, Jeffrey Anderson

Midwest Regional all tournament team[edit]

Final Four[edit]

During the Final Four round, regardless of the seeds of the participating teams, the champion of the top overall top seed's region (Virginia's South Region) plays against the champion of the fourth-ranked top seed's region (Xavier's West Region), and the champion of the second overall top seed's region (Villanova's East Region) plays against the champion of the third-ranked top seed's region (Kansas's Midwest Region).

Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas[edit]

National Semifinals
March 31
National Championship Game
April 2
           
S11 Loyola–Chicago 57
W3 Michigan 69
W3 Michigan 62
E1 Villanova 79
E1 Villanova 95
MW1 Kansas 79

National Semifinals[edit]

TBS
March 31
5:09 pm CDT
#11 Loyola-Chicago Ramblers 57, #3 Michigan Wolverines 69
Scoring by half: 29–22, 28–47
Pts: C. Krutwig – 17
Rebs: D. Ingram – 9
Asts: D. Ingram – 2
Pts: M. Wagner – 24
Rebs: M. Wagner – 15
Asts: Z. Simpson – 3
Alamodome – San Antonio
Attendance: 68,257
Referees: Roger Ayers, Mike Roberts, Terry Oglesby
TBS
March 31
7:49 pm CDT
#1 Kansas Jayhawks 79, #1 Villanova Wildcats 95
Scoring by half: 32–47, 47–48
Pts: D. Graham – 23
Rebs: M. Newman – 8
Asts: D. Graham, S. Mykhailiuk – 3
Pts: E. Paschall – 24
Rebs: O. Spellman – 13
Asts: P. Booth, J. Brunson – 6
Alamodome – San Antonio
Attendance: 68,257
Referees: Randy McCall, Michael Stephens, Kipp Kissinger

National Championship[edit]

TBS
April 2
8:20 pm CDT
#3 Michigan Wolverines 62, #1 Villanova Wildcats 79
Scoring by half: 28–37, 34–42
Pts: M. Abdur-Rahkman – 23
Rebs: M. Wagner – 7
Asts: Z. Simpson – 2
Pts: D. DiVincenzo – 31
Rebs: O. Spellman – 11
Asts: D. DiVincenzo – 3
Alamodome – San Antonio
Attendance: 67,831
Referees: Doug Sirmons, Terry Wymer, Jeffrey Anderson

Final Four all-tournament team[edit]

Record by conference[edit]

Conference Bids Record Win % R64 R32 S16 E8 F4 CG NC
Big East 6 9–5 .643 6 4 1 1 1 1 1
Big Ten 4 9–4 .692 4 4 2 1 1 1
Big 12 7 12–7 .632 7 4 4 3 1
Missouri Valley 1 4–1 .800 1 1 1 1 1
ACC 9 12–9 .571 9 5 4 2
WCC 1 2–1 .667 1 1 1
SEC 8 8–8 .500 8 6 2
Mountain West 2 2–2 .500 2 1 1
American 3 2–3 .400 3 2
Atlantic 10 3 2–3 .400 3 1
America East 1 1–1 .500 1 1
C-USA 1 1–1 .500 1 1
MAC 1 1–1 .500 1 1
Big South 1 1–1 .500 1
SWAC 1 1–1 .500 1
Pac-12 3 0–3 .000 1
  • The R64, R32, S16, E8, F4, CG, and NC columns indicate how many teams from each conference were in the round of 64 (first round), round of 32 (second round), Sweet 16, Elite Eight, Final Four, championship game, and national champion, respectively.
  • The "Record" column includes wins in the First Four for the ACC, Atlantic 10, Big South, and SWAC conferences and two losses in the First Four for the Pac-12 conference.
  • The MEAC and NEC conferences each had one representative, eliminated in the First Four with a record of 0–1.
  • The Atlantic Sun, Big Sky, Big West, CAA, Horizon, Ivy League, MAAC, Ohio Valley, Patriot, Southern, Southland, Summit, Sun Belt and WAC conferences each had one representative, eliminated in the First Round with a record of 0–1.

The Pac-12 lost all of its teams after the first day of the main tournament draw, marking the first time since the Big 12 began play in 1996 that one of the six major conferences—defined as the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, SEC, and both versions of the Big East—failed to have a team advance to the tournament's round of 32.[15]

Media coverage[edit]

Television[edit]

CBS Sports and Turner Sports had U.S. television rights to the Tournament under the NCAA March Madness brand. As part of a cycle beginning in 2016, TBS held the rights to the Final Four and to the championship game.[16] Additionally, TBS held the rights to the 2018 Selection Show, which returned to a two-hour format, was presented in front of a studio audience, and promoted that the entire field of the tournament would be unveiled within the first ten minutes of the broadcast,[17] the broadcast was heavily criticized for its quality (including technical problems and an embedded product placement segment for Pizza Hut), as well as initially unveiling the 68-team field in alphabetical order (beginning with automatic qualifiers, followed by the at-large teams) rather than unveiling the matchups region-by-region (which was criticized for having less suspense than the traditional format).[18][19][20]

Television channels[edit]

  • First Four – TruTV
  • First and Second Rounds – CBS, TBS, TNT, and TruTV
  • Regional Semifinals and Finals (Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight) – CBS and TBS
  • National Semifinals (Final Four) – TBS
  • National Championship – TBS

Studio hosts[edit]

  • Greg Gumbel (New York City and San Antonio) – First Round, Second Round, Regionals, Final Four and National Championship Game
  • Ernie Johnson Jr. (New York City, Atlanta, and San Antonio) – First Round, Second Round, Regional Semi-Finals, Final Four and National Championship Game
  • Casey Stern (Atlanta) – First Four, First Round and Second Round

Studio analysts[edit]

  • Charles Barkley (New York City and San Antonio) – First Round, Second Round, Regionals, Final Four and National Championship Game
  • Seth Davis (Atlanta and San Antonio) – First Four, First Round, Second Round, Regional Semi-Finals, Final Four and National Championship Game
  • Brendan Haywood (Atlanta) – First Four, First Round, Second Round, Regional Semi-Finals and Final Four
  • Clark Kellogg (New York City and San Antonio) – First Round, Second Round, Regionals, Final Four and National Championship Game
  • Gregg Marshall (Atlanta) – Regional Semi-Finals
  • Frank Martin (Atlanta) – Second Round
  • Candace Parker (Atlanta) – First Four, First Round, Second Round, Regional Semi-Finals and Final Four
  • Kenny Smith (New York City and San Antonio) – First Round, Second Round, Regionals, Final Four and National Championship Game
  • Wally Szczerbiak (New York City) – Second Round
  • Brad Underwood (Atlanta) – First Round
  • Christian Laettner (San Antonio) – Final Four
  • Danny Manning (San Antonio) – Final Four
  • Kris Jenkins (San Antonio) – Final Four

Commentary teams[edit]

Team Stream broadcasts[edit]
Final Four
National Championship Game

Radio[edit]

Westwood One had exclusive radio rights to the entire tournament.

Internet[edit]

Video[edit]

Live video of games was available for streaming through the following means:[21]

  • NCAA March Madness Live (website and app, no CBS games on digital media players; access to games on Turner channels requires TV Everywhere authentication through provider; 3 hour preview for Turner games is provided before authentication is required)
  • CBS All Access (only CBS games, service subscription required)
  • CBS Sports website and app (only CBS games)
  • Bleacher Report website and Team Stream app (only Turner games, access requires subscription)
  • Watch TBS website and app (only TBS games, requires TV Everywhere authentication)
  • Watch TNT website and app (only TNT games, requires TV Everywhere authentication)
  • Watch truTV website and app (only truTV games, requires TV Everywhere authentication)
  • Websites and apps of cable, satellite, and OTT providers of CBS & Turner (access requires subscription)

Audio[edit]

Live audio of games was available for streaming through the following means:

  • NCAA March Madness Live (website and app)
  • Westwood One Sports website
  • TuneIn (website and app)
  • Websites and apps of Westwood One Sports affiliates

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilco, Daniel (March 17, 2018). "Last perfect bracket busts after UMBC pulls off biggest upset in NCAA tournament history". NCAA.com. National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved March 17, 2018. UMBC (The University of Maryland Baltimore County) scored the biggest upset in the history of the NCAA tournament, beating top overall seed Virginia 74-54 Friday night, and becoming the first 16 seed to win a game in 136 tries. 
  2. ^ Bushnell, Henry (March 17, 2018). "UMBC shocks Virginia, first 16-seed ever to beat a 1". Yahoo Sports. Retrieved March 17, 2018. 
  3. ^ "2016-18 preliminary rounds". NCAA. November 14, 2014. 
  4. ^ "NCAA gives North Carolina a deadline to repeal HB2 or lose events until 2022". newsobserver. Retrieved March 18, 2018. 
  5. ^ "N.C. gets NCAA tourney sites after HB2 repeal". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 18, 2018. 
  6. ^ "Division I teams face penalties, lose postseason". NCAA. May 10, 2017. 
  7. ^ "NCAA conference tournament schedule: Tracking March Madness automatic bids". NCAA. Retrieved March 4, 2018. 
  8. ^ https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkay/2018/03/11/selection-sunday-2018-schedule-official-ncaa-tournament-bracket-and-more-after-march-madness-show/#7106472abf90
  9. ^ "DC colleges will have a season without March Madness for the first time since 1978". Washington Post. March 10, 2018. 
  10. ^ a b c d e @marchmadness (March 25, 2018). "South Region All-Tournament Team" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  11. ^ a b c d e @marchmadness (March 25, 2018). "West Region All-Tournament Team" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  12. ^ a b c d e @marchmadness (March 25, 2018). "East Region All-Tournament Team" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f @marchmadness (March 25, 2018). "Midwest Region All-Tournament Team" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  14. ^ a b c d e "Villanova Wins National Championship For Second Time in Three Years". villanova.com. April 3, 2018. Retrieved April 3, 2018. 
  15. ^ Medcalf, Myron (March 16, 2018). "The fast and unprecedented fall of the Pac-12". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 16, 2018. 
  16. ^ "2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship commentator teams announced". NCAA. February 7, 2018. Retrieved March 5, 2018. 
  17. ^ Russo , Ralph D. (March 6, 2018). "Selection show: Tournament teams revealed in 1st 10 minutes". Washington Post. Associated Press. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved March 12, 2018. 
  18. ^ "TBS really made a mess of the NCAA selection show". Boston.com. March 12, 2018. Retrieved March 12, 2018. 
  19. ^ "6 ways the NCAA bracket selection show was pretty odd". SBNation.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018. 
  20. ^ Caesar, Dan. "Media Views: NCAA tourney 'Selection Show' loses suspense, adds immediacy". stltoday.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018. 
  21. ^ Maiman, Beth (March 8, 2017). "March Madness TV schedule: How to watch and live stream every game in the NCAA men's basketball tournament". NCAA. Retrieved March 9, 2017.