27 Euterpe

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27 Euterpe
27Euterpe (Lightcurve Inversion).png
Lightcurve-based 3D-model of Euterpe
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. R. Hind
Discovery site George Bishop's Obs.
Discovery date 8 November 1853
Designations
MPC designation (27) Euterpe
Pronunciation /juːˈtɜːrp/ ew-TUR-pee
Named after
Euterpe (Greek mythology)[2]
1945 KB
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Euterpe[4]
Adjectives Euterpean
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 163.48 yr (59,711 days)
Aphelion 2.7524 AU
Perihelion 1.9401 AU
2.3463 AU
Eccentricity 0.1731
3.59 yr (1,313 days)
170.66°
0° 16m 27.12s / day
Inclination 1.5837°
94.789°
356.55°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 124 × 75 km (occultation)[1]
96 km[1]
96.9 km[5]
105.80±7.23 km[6]
109.79±1.54 km[7]
118 km[8]
118.000±22.30 km[9]
Mass (1.67±1.01)×1018 kg[6]
Mean density
2.69±1.71 g/cm3[6]
8.500 h[3]
10.377±0.008 h[10]
10.40193±0.00005 h[11]
10.404±0.001 h[3]
10.407±0.002 h[12]
10.4082±0.0001 h[13]
10.410±0.002 h[14][15][a]
10.41 h[16]
0.20±0.03[17]
0.2011±0.0582[9]
0.215±0.033[18]
0.234±0.008[7]
0.298[5]
Tholen = S[1]
SMASS = S[1] · S[19][3]
B–V = 0.878[1]
U–B = 0.502[1]
7.00[1][3][5][7][9] · 7.01±0.02[13]
0.13" to 0.035"

27 Euterpe (/juːˈtɜːrp/ ew-TUR-pee) is a stony asteroid and parent body of the Euterpe family, located in the inner asteroid belt, approximately 100 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by English astronomer John Russell Hind at George Bishop's Observatory in London on 8 November 1853, the asteroid was named after Euterpe, the Muse of music in Greek mythology.[2][20]

Euterpe is one of the brightest asteroids in the night sky.[21] It has an apparent magnitude of 8.3 during a perihelic opposition on 25 December 2015.[22]

It is the parent body of the Euterpe family (410), a stony inner-belt asteroid family of nearly 400 known members.[4][23]:23 Euterpe has been studied by radar.[24]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lightcurve plot of 27 Euterpe, R. D. Stephens (lead) and B. D. Warner at the Palmer Divide Observatory (2000): rotation period 10.410±0.002 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.21±0.01 mag. Summary figures at the LCDB

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 27 Euterpe" (2017-05-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (27) Euterpe. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 18. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (27) Euterpe". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c Shevchenko, Vasilij G.; Tedesco, Edward F. (September 2006). "Asteroid albedos deduced from stellar occultations". Icarus. 184 (1): 211–220. Bibcode:2006Icar..184..211S. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.04.006. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012). "Density of asteroids" (PDF). Planetary and Space Science. 73 (1): 98–118. arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  8. ^ Morrison, D.; Zellner, B. (December 1978). "Polarimetry and radiometry of the asteroids". In: Asteroids. (A80-24551 08-91) Tucson: 1090–1097. Bibcode:1979aste.book.1090M. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  9. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  10. ^ Gandolfi, D.; Cigna, M.; Fulvio, D.; Blanco, C. (January 2009). "CCD and photon-counting photometric observations of asteroids carried out at Padova and Catania observatories". Planetary and Space Science. 57 (1): 1–9. arXiv:0810.1560Freely accessible. Bibcode:2009P&SS...57....1G. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2008.09.014. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  11. ^ Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Behrend, R.; Carry, B.; Delbo, M.; et al. (February 2016). "New and updated convex shape models of asteroids based on optical data from a large collaboration network" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 586: 24. arXiv:1510.07422Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016A&A...586A.108H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527441. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  12. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (January 2011). "Rotation Period Determinations for 27 Euterpe, 296 Phaetusa and 672 Astarte, and a Note on 65 Cybele". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (1): 50–52. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38...50P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  13. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D.; Warner, Brian D.; Megna, Ralph; Coley, Daniel (January 2012). "A Shape Model of the Main-belt Asteroid 27 Euterpe". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (1): 2–5. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39....2S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  14. ^ Stephens, R. D.; Malcolm, G.; Koff, R. A.; Brincat, S. M.; Warner, B. (March 2001). "New Period Determination for 27 Euterpe, a Collaborative Project". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 28: 1–2. Bibcode:2001MPBu...28....1S. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  15. ^ Stephens, R. D. (March 2001). "Combining Collaborative Work". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 28: 5–6. Bibcode:2001MPBu...28....5S. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  16. ^ Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (27) Euterpe". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  17. ^ Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (August 2011). "Thermal Model Calibration for Minor Planets Observed with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer/NEOWISE". The Astrophysical Journal. 736 (2): 9. Bibcode:2011ApJ...736..100M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/736/2/100. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  18. ^ Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  19. ^ Belskaya, I. N.; Fornasier, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Cellino, A.; Antonyuk, K.; et al. (March 2017). "Refining the asteroid taxonomy by polarimetric observations". Icarus. 284: 30–42. Bibcode:2017Icar..284...30B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.11.003. Retrieved 4 November 2017. 
  20. ^ "27 Euterpe". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  21. ^ "Bright Minor Planets 2004". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2008-05-20. 
  22. ^ Yeomans, Donald K. "Horizons Online Ephemeris System". California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2008-05-20. 
  23. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  24. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2011-10-30. 

External links[edit]