329 Svea

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329 Svea
Discovery
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery date 21 March 1892
Designations
MPC designation (329) Svea
Named after
Sweden
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 124.07 yr (45316 d)
Aphelion 2.54003 AU (379.983 Gm)
Perihelion 2.41427 AU (361.170 Gm)
2.47715 AU (370.576 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.025383
3.90 yr (1424.1 d)
283.525°
0° 15m 10.076s / day
Inclination 15.8826°
178.489°
54.9542°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 77.80±1.4 km
22.778 h (0.9491 d)[1]
22.6 ± 0.01 hours[2]
0.0399±0.001
C
9.6

329 Svea is an asteroid from the asteroid belt and the namesake of the small Svea family, approximately 81 kilometers (50 miles) in diameter. The C-type asteroid and is probably composed of carbonaceous material.[3]

It was discovered by Max Wolf on 21 March 1892 in Heidelberg.[4]

The light curve of 329 Svea shows a periodicity of 22.6 ± 0.01 hours, during which time the brightness of the object varies by 0.10 ± 0.03 in magnitude.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "329 Svea". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Menke, John; et al. (October 2008), "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Menke Observatory", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 35 (4): 155–160, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..155M 
  3. ^ Burbine, Thomas H (1998). "Could G-class asteroids be the parent bodies of the CM chondrites?". Meteoritics & Planetary Science. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 33 (2): 253–258. Bibcode:1998M&PS...33..253B. doi:10.1111/j.1945-5100.1998.tb01630.x. ISSN 1945-5100. Retrieved 2016-06-10. 
  4. ^ Hughes, Stefan (2012). Catchers of the Light: The Forgotten Lives of the Men and Women Who First Photographed the Heavens. 1. ArtDeCiel Publishing. p. 444. Bibcode:2015JAHH...18..327O. ISBN 978-1-62050-961-6. OCLC 859270626. Retrieved 10 June 2016. 

External links[edit]