41 Aurigae

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41 Aurigae
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Auriga
41 Aur A
Right ascension  06h 11m 36.59156s[1]
Declination +48° 42′ 39.5603″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.15[2]
41 Aur B
Right ascension  06h 11m 36.55589s[3]
Declination +48° 42′ 47.0528″[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.84[2]
Characteristics
41 Aur A
Evolutionary stage Main sequence
Spectral type A2Va+[4]
B−V color index 0.06[2]
41 Aur B
Evolutionary stage Am star
Spectral type kA5hA5mF0(IV-V)[4]
B−V color index 0.15[2]
Astrometry
41 Aur A
Radial velocity (Rv)31[5] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: +15.085[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −55.907[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)10.5367 ± 0.0689[1] mas
Distance310 ± 2 ly
(94.9 ± 0.6 pc)
41 Aur B
Radial velocity (Rv)29[5] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: +17.183[3] mas/yr
Dec.: −53.536[3] mas/yr
Parallax (π)10.3314 ± 0.0711[3] mas
Distance316 ± 2 ly
(96.8 ± 0.7 pc)
Details
41 Aur A
Temperature9,000+278
−596
[1] K
Rotational velocity (v sin i)138[6] km/s
41 Aur B
Mass1.99±0.10[7] M
Radius1.78+0.12
−0.18
[3] R
Luminosity11.2±0.1[3] L
Temperature7,925+421
−260
[3] K
Rotational velocity (v sin i)133[7] km/s
Other designations
41 Aur, BD+48°1352, HIP 29388, ADS 4773, WDS J06116+4843
41 Aur A: GC 7853, HD 42127, HR 2176, SAO 40925[8]
41 Aur B: GC 7851, HD 42126, HR 2175, SAO 40924[9]
Database references
SIMBADdata

41 Aurigae is a binary star[10] system located around 310–316 light years away from the Sun in the northern constellation of Auriga. It is visible to the naked eye as a dim, white-hued star with a combined apparent visual magnitude of 5.83.[10] This system is moving further from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of 31 km/s,[11] it is a probable member of the Hyades Supercluster.[12]

As of 2012, the pair had an angular separation of 7.39 along a position angle of 357.7°.[13] The primary component is an A-type main-sequence star with a stellar classification of A2Va+[4] and a visual magnitude of 6.15.[2] The magnitude 6.84[2] secondary companion is a possible Am star[14] with a stellar classification of kA5hA5mF0(IV-V),[4] showing the calcium K line and hydrogen lines of an A5 star and the metal lines of an F0 star.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Høg, E.; Fabricius, C.; Makarov, V. V.; Urban, S.; Corbin, T.; et al. (March 2000), "The Tycho-2 catalogue of the 2.5 million brightest stars", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 355: L27–L30, Bibcode:2000A&A...355L..27H, doi:10.1888/0333750888/2862.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  4. ^ a b c d Gray, R. O.; Garrison, R. F. (December 1987), "The Early A-Type Stars: Refined MK Classification, Confrontation with Stroemgren Photometry, and the Effects of Rotation", Astrophysical Journal Supplement, 65: 581, Bibcode:1987ApJS...65..581G, doi:10.1086/191237.
  5. ^ a b Evans, D. S. (June 20–24, 1966). "The Revision of the General Catalogue of Radial Velocities". In Batten, Alan Henry; Heard, John Frederick (eds.). Determination of Radial Velocities and their Applications, Proceedings from IAU Symposium no. 30. University of Toronto: International Astronomical Union. Bibcode:1967IAUS...30...57E.
  6. ^ Royer, F.; et al. (February 2007), "Rotational velocities of A-type stars. III. Velocity distributions", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 463 (2): 671–682, arXiv:astro-ph/0610785, Bibcode:2007A&A...463..671R, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20065224.
  7. ^ a b Zorec, J.; Royer, F. (2012), "Rotational velocities of A-type stars. IV. Evolution of rotational velocities", Astronomy & Astrophysics, 537, arXiv:1201.2052, Bibcode:2012A&A...537A.120Z, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201117691, A120.
  8. ^ "41 Aur A". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  9. ^ "41 Aur B". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  10. ^ a b Eggleton, P. P.; Tokovinin, A. A. (September 2008), "A catalogue of multiplicity among bright stellar systems", Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 389 (2): 869–879, arXiv:0806.2878, Bibcode:2008MNRAS.389..869E, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13596.x.
  11. ^ Anderson, E.; Francis, Ch. (2012), "XHIP: An extended hipparcos compilation", Astronomy Letters, 38 (5): 331, arXiv:1108.4971, Bibcode:2012AstL...38..331A, doi:10.1134/S1063773712050015.
  12. ^ Eggen, O. J. (June 1985), "A systematic search for members of the Hyades Supercluster. IV - The metallic-line stars and ultrashort-period Cepheids", Astronomical Journal, 90: 1046−1059, Bibcode:1985AJ.....90.1046E, doi:10.1086/113812.
  13. ^ Mason, Brian D.; et al. (May 2012), "Speckle Interferometry at the U.S. Naval Observatory. XVIII", The Astronomical Journal, 143 (5): 6, Bibcode:2012AJ....143..124M, doi:10.1088/0004-6256/143/5/124, 124.
  14. ^ Renson, P.; Manfroid, J. (2009), "Catalogue of Ap, HgMn and Am stars", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 498 (3): 961–966, Bibcode:2009A&A...498..961R.