5370 Taranis

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5370 Taranis
Discovery [1]
Discovered by A. Maury
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 2 September 1986
Designations
MPC designation (5370) Taranis
Named after
Taranis[2]
(Celtic mythology)
1986 RA
NEO · Amor[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 29.93 yr (10,932 d)
Aphelion 5.4438 AU
Perihelion 1.2118 AU
3.3278 AU
Eccentricity 0.6359
6.07 yr (2,217 days)
27.914°
0° 9m 44.64s / day
Inclination 19.131°
177.85°
161.27°
Earth MOID 0.2196 AU · 85.6 LD
Jupiter MOID 0.3673 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.30 km (derived)[3]
3.6 km (Gehrels)[1]
5.308±0.082 km[4][5]
6.3±0.05 km[5][6]
0.037±0.009[5][6]
0.051±0.009[4][5]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
S (assumed)[3]
15.2[1][4] · 15.56[3][7]

5370 Taranis, provisional designation 1986 RA, is an asteroid and suspected dormant comet on an eccentric orbit, classified as near-Earth object of the Amor group, approximately 5 kilometers in diameter.

Description[edit]

Taranis was discovered on 2 September 1986, by French astronomer Alain Maury at the Palomar Observatory in California, United States.[2] It is one of very few asteroids located in the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter.[8] When at aphelion of 5.4 AU,[1] the object is roughly the same distance from the Sun as Jupiter is when Jupiter is at aphelion. The unstable resonance with Jupiter is expected to last roughly 7.3 million years.[8]

Taranis also is expected of being a dormant comet.[5] On 10 September 2099 it will pass 0.1325 AU (19,820,000 km; 12,320,000 mi) from Earth.[1]

This minor planet was named after the Gaulish god of thunder Taranis from Celtic mythology, the official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 1 September 1993 (M.P.C. 22509).[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 5370 Taranis (1986 RA)" (2016-07-16 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c "5370 Taranis (1986 RA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (5370) Taranis". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  4. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Mommert, M.; Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Bottke, W. F.; et al. (October 2015). "ExploreNEOs. VIII. Dormant Short-period Comets in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 150 (4): 9. arXiv:1508.04116Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015AJ....150..106M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/4/106. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  6. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (December 2011). "NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 743 (2): 17. arXiv:1109.6400Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743..156M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/156. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  7. ^ Wisniewski, W. Z. (June 1987). "Photometry of six radar target asteroids". Icarus: 566–572. Bibcode:1987Icar...70..566W. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(87)90096-0. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  8. ^ a b Roig, F.; Nesvorný, D.; Ferraz-Mello, S. (September 2002). "Asteroids in the 2 : 1 resonance with Jupiter: dynamics and size distribution [ Erratum: 2002MNRAS.336.1391R ]". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 335 (2): 417–431. Bibcode:2002MNRAS.335..417R. doi:10.1046/j.1365-8711.2002.05635.x. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 
  9. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 February 2018. 

External links[edit]