71 Niobe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
71 Niobe
A614.M1014.shape.png
Lightcurve-based 3D-model of Niobe
Discovery [1]
Discovered by R. Luther
Discovery site Düsseldorf Obs.
Discovery date 13 August 1861
Designations
MPC designation (71) Niobe
Pronunciation /ˈn.əb/ NY-ə-bee
Named after
Niobe (Greek mythology)[2]
main-belt[1][3] · (middle)
Gallia[4]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 154.10 yr (56,286 d)
Aphelion 3.2348 AU
Perihelion 2.2790 AU
2.7569 AU
Eccentricity 0.1733
4.58 yr (1,672 d)
178.02°
0° 12m 55.08s / day
Inclination 23.259°
316.02°
266.88°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
75.87±3.28 km[5]
80.86±0.80 km[6]
83.42±1.7 km[7]
92.75 km (taken)[8]
92.753 km[9]
92.842±0.644 km[10]
11 h[11]
11.21 h[12]
14.34±0.05 h[13]
14.34 h[14][13]
14.38±0.02 h[15]
35.5±0.1 h[16][a]
35.617948 h[8]
35.81±0.01 h[17]
35.8521±0.0005 h[18]
35.864±0.002 h[19]
0.2446[9]
0.2475±0.0346[10]
0.3052±0.013[7]
0.326±0.008[6]
0.369±0.033[5]
Tholen = S[3]
SMASS = Xe[3] · M[10] · A[20] · X[8]
B–V = 0.803[3]
U–B = 0.439[3]
7.30[3][5][6][7][10]
7.31[8]
7.31±0.09[9][15]

71 Niobe (/ˈn.əb/ NY-ə-bee) is a stony Gallia asteroid and relatively slow rotator from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 90 kilometers (56 miles) in diameter. It was discovered by the German astronomer Robert Luther on 13 August 1861, and named after Niobe, a character in Greek mythology. In 1861, the brightness of this asteroid was shown to vary by astronomer Friedrich Tietjen.[21]

Description[edit]

Niobe is a member of the Gallia family (802), a small family of nearly 200 known stony asteroids.[22]

In 2006, it was examined by radar using the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope in Puerto Rico. This was supplemented by optical observations intended to build a lightcurve. The resulting estimated rotation period of 35.6 hours, or 1.48 Earth days, superseded an earlier estimate of the rotation period as 14.3 hours. The radar data produced an estimate of a maximum equatorial diameter of 94 km, which is consistent with earlier estimates based upon infrared data if the shape is assumed to be slightly elongated.[16][a]

The rotation period was further refined to 35.864 ± 0.001 hours during observations through 2010. Six stellar occultations of this asteroid between 2004 and 2007 produced chords ranging from 13–72 km (8–45 mi), which are statistically consistent with the published maximum diameter estimates.[19]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lightcurve plot of 71 Niobe, Palmer Divide Observatory, B. D. Warner (2006): rotation period 35.5±0.1 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.22±0.02 mag. Quality code of 2+. Summary figures at the LCDB

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "71 Niobe". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  2. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (71) Niobe. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 22. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 71 Niobe" (2018-02-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  4. ^ "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  5. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  6. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 18 April 2018. Online catalog
  7. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Archived from the original on 3 June 2016. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (71) Niobe". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  9. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  10. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  11. ^ Barucci, M. A.; Fulchignoni, M.; Burchi, R.; D'Ambrosio, V. (January 1985). "Rotational properties of ten main belt asteroids - Analysis of the results obtained by photoelectric photometry [ Erratum: 1985Icar...62..173B ]". Icarus: 152–162. Bibcode:1985Icar...61..152B. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(85)90161-7. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  12. ^ Lustig, G.; Dvorak, R. (December 1974). "Photometric investigations of the asteroids /43/ Ariadne and /71/ Niobe". Acta Physica Austriaca: 89–97.InGerman.ResearchsupportedbytheOesterreichischeNationalbank. Bibcode:1975AcPhA..43...89L. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  13. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (71) Niobe". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  14. ^ Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Erikson, A.; Oja, T.; Magnusson, P.; Festin, L.; et al. (March 1998). "Physical studies of asteroids. XXXII. Rotation periods and UBVRI-colours for selected asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement: 525–540. Bibcode:1998A&AS..128..525P. doi:10.1051/aas:1998393. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  15. ^ a b Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W. (October 1989). "Asteroid lightcurve observations from 1979-1981". Icarus: 314–364. Bibcode:1989Icar...81..314H. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(89)90056-0. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  16. ^ a b Warner, Brian D.; Shepard, Michael K.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr; Crawford, Greg; Husarik, Marek (December 2006). "Analysis of the lightcurve of 71 Niobe". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (4): 102–103. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33..102W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  17. ^ Sada, Pedro V.; Warner, Brian D. (June 2007). "Rotation Period of Asteroid 340 Eduarda and Refined Period for Asteroid 71 Niobe". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (2): 37–38. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...37S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  18. ^ Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Behrend, R.; Carry, B.; Delbo, M.; et al. (February 2016). "New and updated convex shape models of asteroids based on optical data from a large collaboration network" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 586: 24. arXiv:1510.07422. Bibcode:2016A&A...586A.108H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527441. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  19. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (July 2010). "A New Investigation of the Rotation Period and Size of 71 Niobe". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 37 (3): 98–99. Bibcode:2010MPBu...37...98P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  20. ^ Belskaya, I. N.; Fornasier, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Cellino, A.; Antonyuk, K.; et al. (March 2017). "Refining the asteroid taxonomy by polarimetric observations". Icarus. 284: 30–42. Bibcode:2017Icar..284...30B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.11.003. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  21. ^ Harwood, Margaret (December 1924). "Variations in the Light of Asteroids". Harvard College Observatory Circular: 1–15. Bibcode:1924HarCi.269....1H. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  22. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 18 April 2018.

External links[edit]