885 Ulrike

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885 Ulrike
Discovery [1]
Discovered byS. Belyavskyj
Discovery siteSimeiz Obs.
Discovery date23 September 1917
Designations
MPC designation(885) Ulrike
Named after
Ulrike von Levetzow[2]
(friend and love of Goethe)
1917 CX · 1933 QQ
1934 XL · A906 SE
main-belt[1][3] · (outer)
background · Themis[4][5]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc111.75 yr (40,816 d)
Aphelion3.6706 AU
Perihelion2.5142 AU
3.0924 AU
Eccentricity0.1870
5.44 yr (1,986 d)
173.02°
0° 10m 52.32s / day
Inclination3.3043°
149.05°
204.31°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
30.537±0.756 km[6]
33.43±5.3 km[7]
44.69±1.06 km[8]
4.90±0.05 h[9][10]
0.047[8]
0.083±0.034[7]
0.109±0.025[6]
C (assumed)[9]
10.60[6]
10.7[1][3][7][8]

885 Ulrike, provisional designation 1917 CX, is a background asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 33 kilometers (21 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 23 September 1917, by Soviet astronomer Sergey Belyavsky at the Simeiz Observatory on the Crimean peninsula.[1]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was allegedly named after Ulrike von Levetzow (1804–1899), a friend and last love of the German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who met Ulrike during summertime 1821–1823 in Marienbad, Bohemia.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

When applying the hierarchical clustering method to its proper orbital elements, Ulrike is a non-family asteroid of the main belt's background population (Nesvorny) and a core member of the Themis family (Zappalà; Milani and Knežević), respectively.[4][5]

It orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.5–3.7 AU once every 5 years and 5 months (1,986 days; semi-major axis of 3.09 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.19 and an inclination of 3° with respect to the ecliptic.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "885 Ulrike (1917 CX)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(885) Ulrike". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (885) Ulrike. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 80. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_886. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 885 Ulrike (1917 CX)" (2018-05-24 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Asteroid 885 Ulrike". Small Bodies Data Ferret. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  5. ^ a b "AstDyS-2 data for (885) Ulrike – proper elements". AstDyS – Asteroids Dynamic Site. Retrieved 30 August 2017.
  6. ^ a b c Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E. A.; Masiero, J. R.; et al. (June 2016). "NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos V1.0". NASA Planetary Data System: EAR-A-COMPIL-5-NEOWISEDIAM-V1.0. Bibcode:2016PDSS..247.....M. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  7. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System – IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0: IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  8. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 5 July 2018. (online, AcuA catalog p. 153)
  9. ^ a b "LCDB Data for (885) Ulrike". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  10. ^ Menke, John (December 2005). "Asteroid lightcurve results from Menke Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (4): 85–88. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...85M. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 5 July 2018.

External links[edit]