88611 Teharonhiawako

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88611 Teharonhiawako
Discovery
Discovered byDeep Ecliptic Survey
Discovery date20 August 2001
Designations
MPC designation(88611) Teharonhiawako
PronunciationMohawk: [dɛhaɺũhjáːɰaɡo]
2001 QT297
cubewano[1]
(cold)[2]
Orbital characteristics[6]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc4463 days (12.22 yr)
Aphelion45.235 AU (6.7671 Tm)
Perihelion42.454 AU (6.3510 Tm)
43.845 AU (6.5591 Tm)
Eccentricity0.031712
290.32 yr (106041 d)
158.44°
0.0033949°/day
Inclination2.5834°
304.78°
236.43°
Known satellitesSawiskera
Earth MOID41.4583 AU (6.20207 Tm)
Jupiter MOID37.0149 AU (5.53735 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions220+41
−44
 km
(combined)
178+33
−36
 km
(primary)
129+24
−26
 km
(secondary)[3]
Mass2.445×1018 kg[4]
Mean density
1.15+0.87
−0.91
 g/cm3
[3]
4.7526±0.0007 h[5]
0.145+0.086
−0.045
[3]
6.00±0.13,[5] 5.8[6]

88611 Teharonhiawako is a trans-Neptunian object and a member of the cold Classical Kuiper belt, measuring about 220 km in diameter. It is a binary object, with a large companion named Sawiskera (pronounced [zaɰískɛɺa] in Mohawk, formally designed (88611) Teharonhiawako I Sawiskera), which at 126 km in diameter is about two-thirds the size of its primary.[7]

Teharonhiawako was discovered on August 20, 2001, by the Deep Ecliptic Survey, and Sawiskera was identified a month later. The primary is named after Teharonhia:wako, a god of maize in the Iroquois creation myth, while the secondary is named after his evil twin brother Sawiskera. The objects were named in 2007.[7]

Sawiskera's orbit has the following parameters: semi-major-axis—27670 ± 120 km, period—828.76 ± 0.22 days, eccentricity—0.2494 ± 0.0021 and inclination—144.42 ± 0.35°(retrograde). The total system mass is about 2.4 × 1018 kg.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marc W. Buie (2005-07-11). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 88611". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-09-28.
  2. ^ Mike Brown's "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?" "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-10-15. Retrieved 2018-02-13.
  3. ^ a b c Vilenius, E.; Kiss, C.; Mommert, M.; et al. (2014). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region X. Analysis of classical Kuiper belt objects from Herschel and Spitzer observations". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 564: A35. arXiv:1403.6309. Bibcode:2014A&A...564A..35V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201322416.
  4. ^ a b Grundy, W. M.; Noll, K. S.; Nimmo, F.; Roe, H. G.; Buie, M. W.; Porter, S. B.; Benecchi, S. D.; Stephens, D. C.; Levison, H. F.; Stansberry, J. A. (2011). "Five new and three improved mutual orbits of transneptunian binaries" (pdf). Icarus. 213 (2): 678. arXiv:1103.2751. Bibcode:2011Icar..213..678G. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.012.
  5. ^ a b Vilenius, E.; Kiss, C.; Mommert, M.; et al. (2014). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region VI. Herschel>/PACS observations and thermal modeling of 19 classical Kuiper belt objects". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 541: A94. arXiv:1204.0697. Bibcode:2012A&A...541A..94V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201118743.
  6. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 88611 Teharonhiawako (2001 QT297)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 25 March 2016.
  7. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (6 May 2007). "(88611) Teharonhiawako and Sawiskera". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2008-09-28.

External links[edit]