914 Palisana

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914 Palisana
Discovery
Discovered byMax Wolf
Discovery siteHeidelberg Obs.
Discovery date4 July 1919
Designations
MPC designation(914) Palisana
Named after
Johann Palisa
(Austrian astronomer)[1]
1919 FN · A904 PB
A916 WC
main-belt · Phocaea[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc84.07 yr (30,706 days)
Aphelion2.9857 AU
Perihelion1.9300 AU
2.4578 AU
Eccentricity0.2148
3.85 yr (1,407 days)
71.191°
0° 15m 20.88s / day
Inclination25.206°
255.80°
49.144°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions76 km[4]
76.61±1.7 km[5]
77.000±13.12 km[6]
91.2 km[2]
97.33±1.49 km[7]
Mass(2.35 ± 0.24) × 1018 kg[8]
Mean density
8.36 ± 1.85[8] g/cm3
15.922 h (0.6634 d)
0.0943±0.004[5]
0.0666[2]
0.059±0.002[7]
0.0934±0.0376[6]
B–V = 0.741
U–B = 0.368
Tholen = CU [3][8]
C[2]
8.76[3][2][5][7][6]
8.96±0.30[9]

914 Palisana, provisional designation 1919 FN, is a Phocaea asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 77 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory on 4 July 1919.[10]

Description[edit]

The carbonaceous asteroid is classified as a CU-type on the Tholen taxonomic scheme, it orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.9–3.0 AU once every 3 years and 10 months (1,407 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.21 and an inclination of 25° with respect to the ecliptic.[3]

Measurements using the adaptive optics at the W. M. Keck Observatory give a diameter estimate of 76 km. The size ratio between the major and minor axes is 1.16.[4]

The minor planet is named after the Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa (1848–1925), who has discovered many asteroids himself between 1874 and 1923.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(914) Palisana". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (914) Palisana. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 82. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_915. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  2. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (914) Palisana". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 914 Palisana (1919 FN)" (2015-11-07 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  4. ^ a b Marchis, F.; et al. (November 2006), "Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids. I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey", Icarus, 185 (1): 39–63, Bibcode:2006Icar..185...39M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.06.001, PMC 2600456, PMID 19081813, retrieved 27 March 2013.
  5. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. 12: IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  6. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  7. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  8. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73 (1): 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  9. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  10. ^ "914 Palisana (1919 FN)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 30 August 2016.

External links[edit]