AMOS (satellite bus)

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The AMOS (Hebrew: עמוס‬), an acronym for Affordable Modular Optimized Satellite, is a family of light weight satellite buses for geostationary orbit communication designed and manufactured by IAI of Israel.[1]

Families[edit]

Little is known regarding the different variations, but it is known of at least two built versions and a possible third in development.[2]

AMOS (original)[edit]

The AMOS bus is a lightweight version used for satellites between 1.5 to 2 tonnes (1.7 to 2.2 tons), with 800 W to 1700 W of power.[3][4][5] The platform started with the Amos-1, the smallest of all the family, and increased mass, payload successively in the Amos-2 and Amos-3.[6]

AMOS 4000[edit]

The AMOS 4000 platform is the second generation, a much bigger and sophisticated platform, it is prepared for satellites weighing between 3 to 5.5 tonnes (3.3 to 6.1 tons) and with power generation between 3 kW to 12 kW. It offers more autonomous capabilities and advanced control applications, it is composed of three modules: Bus, Repeater and Earth Facing Antennas.[7]

Only two satellites have used this bus: Amos-4, massing 4,250 kg (9,370 lb) and generating 6 kW of power.[8][9] And Amos-6 at 5,400 kg (11,900 lb) and generating 10 kW.[7][10] But Amos-6 is enhanced by using electric propulsion for station keeping only. Orbit raising is still done by the more traditional and faster chemical propulsion.[11]

AMOS E[edit]

The next development of the AMOS platform is the implementation of pure electric propulsion, the increased efficiency for orbit raising and station keeping in comparison to chemical propulsion can result in reductions of mass of up to 50%. The expected spacecraft mass will be in the 1.5-to-2-tonne (1.7-to-2.2-ton) range and offer an expected life of 15 years. This new product will be ready by 2018 and IAI expect it to win some foreign orders.[11][12]

List of AMOS-based satellites[edit]

The currently known uses of the AMOS platform has been for most of the AMOS series of civilian communications satellites operated by Spacecom, also of Israel.[2]

See also[edit]

  • Ofeq – Ofeq family of satellites on which technology the first versions of the AMOS platform was based.
  • EROS (satellite) – EROS family of Earth observation satellites also made by IAI.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IAI to launch new 5-ton Amos satellite". Space Daily. 2012-07-16. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  2. ^ a b Kribs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-09). "IAI: AMOS Bus". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  3. ^ a b "AMOS1 Communications Satellite". IAI. 2015-10-12. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  4. ^ a b "AMOS2 Communications Satellite". IAI. 2015-10-12. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  5. ^ a b "AMOS3 Communications Satellite". IAI. 2015-10-12. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  6. ^ "IAI/MBT Division Space Technologies". IAI. 2001-06-18. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  7. ^ a b "Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) has successfully launched Spacecom's AMOS-4". IAI. 2013-08-31. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  8. ^ a b Kribs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 4". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  9. ^ a b "AMOS4 Communications Satellite". IAI. 2015-10-12. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  10. ^ a b Kribs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 6". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  11. ^ a b de Selding, Peter B. (2015-10-15). "Israel Aerospace Industries Sharpens its Satellite Export Focus". Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  12. ^ "IAI is developing the AMOS-E Satellite". IAI. 2015-10-12. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  13. ^ Kribs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 1 → Intelsat 24". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  14. ^ Kribs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 2". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-26. 
  15. ^ Kribs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 3 (AMOS 60)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-26.