Admiralty Naval Staff

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Admiralty Naval Staff
United Kingdom
Department overview
Formed 1917
Preceding Department
Dissolved 1964
Superseding agency
Jurisdiction Government of the United Kingdom
Headquarters Admiralty Building
Whitehall
London
Department executives
Parent department Admiralty
Child Department

The Admiralty Naval Staff[1] was the former senior command, operational planning, policy and strategy department within the British Admiralty. It was established in 1917 and existed until 1964 when the department of the Admiralty was abolished, and the staff departments function continued within the Navy Department of the Ministry of Defence until 1971 when its functions became part of the new Naval Staff, Navy Department of the Ministry of Defence.[2]

History and development[edit]

In December 1916 Admiral Sir John Jellicoe was appointed Admiral of the Fleet and First Sea Lord he would oversee the expansion of the Naval Staff at the Admiralty and the introduction of convoys, In April, 1917 the Admiralty War Staff function was abolished and replaced by a new Admiralty Naval Staff department and Jellicoe was also given the additional title of Chief of the Naval Staff he was assisted initially by two deputies the Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff and the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff, these would be joined later by the Deputy First Sea Lord and Vice Chief of the Naval Staff, Jellicoe was relieved at the end of 1917. Changes in the structure of the Staff were implemented from 1918 onward during the interwar period some of the divisions were wound down in peace time but would be re-established with the advent of the Second World War. After the war the divisions were once again downsized.

Duties[edit]

The term 'Naval Staff' does not mean all Naval Officers serving in the former Admiralty Department, it means the divisions that are responsible under the Office of the Chief of Naval Staff and including his deputy, vice and assistant chiefs of the staff for the formulation of naval strategy including strategic planning, conduct of operations, implementation of naval policy, application of tactical doctrines, the collection and dissemination of intelligence and for stating the broad naval requirements, including the quantities and specification of ships, naval aircraft, armament and equipment the Naval Staff also included some civilian members.

Admiralty departments[edit]

The admiralty divisions should be not confused with its departments which were distinct and separate from the function of the naval staff in that they were superintended by the offices of the various Sea Lords responsible for them and were primarily administrative and logistical support bodies.

Members of the naval staff[edit]

Board of Admiralty member (*)

Structure of the naval staff[edit]

May 1917[edit]

The Naval Staff was organised by Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Jellicoe as follows:[3]

June 1917[edit]

The Naval Staff was organised as follows:[4]

December 1917[edit]

The Naval Staff was organised as follows:[5]

1918 to 1919[edit]

The Naval Staff was re-organised under Admiral of the Fleet Sir Rosslyn Wemyss as follows:[6][7]

1920[edit]

The Naval Staff was re-organised under Admiral of the Fleet Sir David Beatty, as follows:

1921 to 1926[edit]

The Naval Staff was re-organised during the early inter-war years, and the post Deputy First Sea Lord is abolished:

1927 to 1929[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Charles Madden re-structured the Naval Staff as follows:[8]

1932[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Frederick Field organised the Naval Staff as follows:[9]

1935[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Ernle Chatfield kept the Naval Staff as follows:[10]

1941[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Dudley Pound re-organised, the Naval Staff as follows:[11]

1945[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunninghamre-organised the Naval Staff, as follows:

1951[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Bruce Fraser re-organised the Naval Staff, as follows:[13]

1956[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Earl, Louis Mountbatten, re-organised the Naval Staff, as follows:[14]

1958[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Earl, Louis Mountbatten, re-organised the Naval Staff, as follows:[15]

1962[edit]

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Caspar John, re-organised the Naval Staff, as follows:[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Moretz, Joseph (2001). The Royal Navy and the capital ship in the interwar period an operational perspective. London: Frank Cass. p. 246. ISBN 9781136340369. 
  2. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (31 October 1967). The Navy List. Spink and Sons Ltd, London, England. pp. 524–532. 
  3. ^ Smith, Gordon. "British Admiralty World War 1". naval-history.net. naval-history.net, 21 October 2014. Retrieved 1 February 2017. 
  4. ^ Smith, Gordon. "British Admiralty World War 1". naval-history.net. naval-history.net, 21 October 2014. Retrieved 1 February 2017. 
  5. ^ Smith, Gordon. "British Admiralty World War 1". naval-history.net. naval-history.net, 21 October 2014. Retrieved 1 February 2017. 
  6. ^ Smith, Gordon. "British Admiralty World War 1". naval-history.net. naval-history.net, 21 October 2014. Retrieved 1 February 2017. 
  7. ^ Black, Nicholas Duncan (2005). ‘The Admiralty War Staff and its influence on the conduct of the naval between 1914 and 1918.’, Ph.D. Thesis. University College University of London. pp. 250 to 251. 
  8. ^ Hamilton, C. I. (Feb 3, 2011). The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making, 1805–1927. Cambridge University Press. p. 292. ISBN 9781139496544. 
  9. ^ Svonavec, Stephen. "Royal Navy October 1932 - Admiralty". fleetorganization.com. Svonavec Stephen, (2001-2014). Retrieved 6 February 2017. 
  10. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (18 September 1935). The Navy List. Sprink and Sons Ltd, London, England. pp. 414–415. 
  11. ^ Clancy, Patrick; Straka, William. "HyperWar: War at Sea 1939-1945, I: The Defensive [Chapter 1]". ibiblio.org. HyperWar Foundation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2017. 
  12. ^ Archives, The National. "Torpedo, Anti-Submarine and Mine Warfare Division, Naval Staff, Admiralty: The tactical employment of patrol groups,". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, ADM 1/31013, 1948. Retrieved 8 February 2017. 
  13. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (18 April 1951). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 326–327. 
  14. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (18 April 1956). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 1239–1241. 
  15. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (18 January 1958). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 1227–1229. 
  16. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (Spring 1962). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 906–908. 

Attribution[edit]

Primary source for this article is by Harley Simon, Lovell Tony, (2014), Naval Staff (Royal Navy), dreadnoughtproject.org, http://www.dreadnoughtproject.org.

Sources[edit]

  • Black, Nicholas (2009). The British Naval Staff in the First World War. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press. ISBN 9781843834427.
  • "Proposals by Director of Naval Intelligence for carrying out the Duties of a General Staff and Re-organisation of the Naval Intelligence Department." 15 May 1909. The National Archives. ADM 1/8047.
  • Naval Staff, Training and Staff Duties Division (1929). The Naval Staff of the Admiralty. Its Work and Development. B.R. 1845 (late C.B. 3013). Copy at The National Archives. ADM 234/434
  • Rodger. N.A.M., (1979) The Admiralty (offices of state), T. Dalton, Lavenham, ISBN 978-0900963940.
  • Smith, Gordon (2014), British Admiralty, Part 2 - Changes in Admiralty Departments 1913-1920, Naval-History.Net.
  • Stationary Office, H.M. (1935). The Navy List. Sprink and Sons Ltd, London, England. pp. 414–415.
  • Stationary Office, H.M. (1951). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 326–327.
  • Stationary Office, H.M. (1956). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 1239–1241.
  • Stationary Office, H.M. (1958). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 1227–1229.
  • Stationary Office, H.M. (1962). The Navy List. Spink and Son Ltd, London, England. pp. 906–908.

External links[edit]