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La Segunda

La Segunda is a Chilean afternoon daily newspaper, owned by El Mercurio SAP. Their tendency is conservative, is the first Chilean newspaper to disclose information that occurred in the morning because it is evening, its time distribution is from 14:00. La Segunda first appeared as a nightly on July 29, 1931, as an update of the evening Las Últimas Noticias, due to the overabundance of information originated during the fall of President Carlos Ibáñez del Campo; the newspaper is remembered for its opposition to the government of Salvador Allende and its accession to the military regime. During those times was used as a means of government propaganda, publishing news with sensationalist and confrontational language, considered inappropriate for El Mercurio. Famous is the cover of La Segunda newspaper of July 24, 1975, which stated that members of the Revolutionary Left Movement were killing each outside Chile, being discovered that all were killed within Chile, in what became known as Operation Colombo.

The headline that day read "exterminados como ratas". Since the 2000s, La Segunda expanded its distribution to the regions of Valparaíso, Metropolitan of Santiago and O'Higgins. In other regions, the newspaper is distributed the following day. Official site

Conesville, Iowa

Conesville is a city in Muscatine County, United States. The population was 432 at the 2010 census, it is part of the Muscatine Micropolitan Statistical Area. Conesville was once a depot on Cedar Rapids and Northern Railway, it was named for a prosperous landowner. Beebe S. Cone had established himself as a co-owner of a distillery in Conesville, Ohio; the distillery was not re-built by him. By 1870 he had established himself as a notable farmer in Orono Township in Iowa. Conesville is located at 41°22′46″N 91°21′1″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.36 square miles, all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 432 people, 132 households, 105 families living in the city; the population density was 1,200.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 153 housing units at an average density of 425.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 57.6% White, 0.7% African American, 1.6% Asian, 38.2% from other races, 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 63.0% of the population.

There were 132 households of which 52.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 15.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 13.6% had a male householder with no wife present, 20.5% were non-families. 15.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.27 and the average family size was 3.66. The median age in the city was 29 years. 35.9% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 47.7 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 424 people, 133 households, 100 families living in the city; the population density was 1,147.7 people per square mile. There were 144 housing units at an average density of 389.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 78.77% White, 0.24% Asian, 20.28% from other races, 0.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 58.96% of the population. There were 133 households out of which 42.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.1% were non-families.

18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.19 and the average family size was 3.62. In the city, the population was spread out with 36.3% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 14.2% from 45 to 64, 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 126.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 114.3 males. The median income for a household in the city was $29,464, the median income for a family was $30,000. Males had a median income of $28,000 versus $19,167 for females; the per capita income for the city was $10,097. About 11.1% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.3% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over

Mikayil Huseynov

Mikayil Alesger oglu Huseynov was a Soviet Azerbaijani architect and historian of architecture, People’s Architect of the USSR, Professor. Huseynov was born on 19 April 1905, in Baku, in a well-off family, his father was a millionaire, had streamships on the Caspian Sea and a great mansion on the seafront. His origination hang over him as the sword of Damocles and he could be arrested at any time, he died on October 7, 1992 and was buried in the Alley of Honor in Baku. Until 1946, he worked in close creative and scientific cooperation with S. A. Dadashov; when they were students Huseynov and Dadashov awarded the first prize for joint project of the monument to Nizami Ganjavi-the eminent poet and thinker of the 12th century. Building of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Azerbaijan, Azerbaijan State Conservatory, Nizami Museum of Azerbaijan Literature in Baku, pavilion of All-Russia Exhibition Centre of Azerbaijan in Moscow are among their best architectural works. Individual works of Huseynov-project of State Public Library named after M.

F. Akhundov, group of buildings of the National Academy of Sciences of the Azerbaijan SSR in Baku, works on a matter of architecture and urban building problems and others. •Second Class State Stalin Prize – for architectural project of the pavilion of All-Russia Exhibition Centre of Azerbaijan.

Political funding in New Zealand

Only quite political funding in New Zealand has become an issue of public policy. Now there is direct and indirect funding by public money as well as a skeleton regulation of income and transparency. Like a few other established democracies New Zealand election law stipulates statutory limits for political spending by individuals, groups or organisations that occurs at election times to influence political discourse in general or the outcome of a specific election in particular. In New Zealand spending limits for political parties and candidates do not include some typical election expenses. Political contributions by foreign donors are allowed as long as they do not exceed NZ$1,500. There is no other limit to any political contribution made to parties and/ or candidates, either for election campaign or during specific time periods. Donations by government contractors are allowed, too. Parties and candidates have to file financial reports that do not cover expenses, just source of revenue. A return must be filed by a party secretary with the Electoral Commission within 10 working days of receipt whenever a party receives a donation that: exceeds $30,000, or when added to all the donations received from the same donor in the preceding 12 months exceeds $30,000.

As political parties in New Zealand only need to declare private donations which exceed NZ$30,000 over a period of 12 months there is no way to tell the absolute total of donations to each party. The Electoral Commission of New Zealand does, have data on declared donations from 1996 – 2017. In early December 2019, the New Zealand Government passed urgent legislation to limit foreign donations over NZ$50. Justice Minister Andrew Little announced that this was part of the Government's efforts to combat foreign interference in New Zealand elections, bringing New Zealand in line with Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States which have introduced similar legislation; the Electoral Commission of New Zealand is required under Part 6 of the Broadcasting Act 1989 to allocate money appropriated by Parliament to enable all registered political parties to broadcast election programmes and election advertising during the election period for a general election. On 21 February, in accordance with section 74, the Associate Minister of Justice notified the Commission that the amount of money appropriated by Parliament to enable political parties to fund their broadcasting of election programmes and election advertising for the 2017 general election is $3,605,000 plus GST.

This is a $750,000 increase on the amount allocated in 2005, 2008, 2011 and 2014. Section 78 of the Broadcasting Act 1989 specifies that a party is only eligible to receive an allocation if it has provided a notice of qualification by the date required by the Commission that the party considers it will be qualified for an allocation. Parties may use the allocation to buy advertising time on television and radio, place advertising on the internet and pay for the production costs of television and internet advertising; the Act prohibits parties from using their own money to buy time to broadcast television and radio advertisements. However, production costs for television and radio advertising can be paid for using the allocation or a party’s own funds. Television and radio advertisements can only be broadcast from writ day. Parties may use the allocation to produce election advertisements and to place advertising on the internet before and after writ day. However, parties must use their own money to place election advertisements on the internet that only appear before writ day.

Parties may use their allocation to produce internet advertisements, but parties must publish these advertisements both before and after writ day. Edwards, Bryce:'Political Finance and Inequality in New Zealand', New Zealand Sociology, vol. 23, no. 2, 2008, pp. 4–17. Geddis, Andrew:'Rethinking the Funding of New Zealand's Election Campaigns', Policy Quarterly, vol. 3, no. 1, 2007, pp. 3–10. Geddis, Andrew:'The Electoral Amendment Bill', Policy Quarterly, vol. 6, no.3, 2010, pp. 3–7. Orr, Graeme:'Public Money and Electioneering. A View from across the Tasman', Policy Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 3, 2010, pp. 21–25. Tham, Joo-Cheong:'Regulating Political Contributions. Another View from Across the Tasman', Policy Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 3, 2010, pp. 26–30. Vowles, Jack:'Parties and Society in New Zealand', in: Paul Webb, David Farrell and Ian Holliday: Political Parties in Advanced Industrial Democracies, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002, pp. 409–37. Wilson, John F.: Donations to Political Parties: Disclosure Regimes, 2004.

Governorate of Cuba

Since the 16th century the island of Cuba had been under the control of the governor-captain general of Santo Domingo. The conquest of Cuba was organized in 1510 by the restored Viceroy of the Indies, Diego Colón, under the command of Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar, who became Cuba's first governor until his death in 1524. Velázquez founded the city of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción de Baracoa in 1511 and convoked a general cabildo to govern Cuba, authorized by the king of Spain. Hernán Cortés's Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire was undertaken from Cuba. Cuba was incorporated in New Spain after the conquest of Mexico. Historia general de los hechos de los Castellanos en Las Islas Y Tierra firme