Alice Cooper (sculptor)

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Alice Cooper
Born (1875-04-08)April 8, 1875
Glenwood, Iowa
Died March 4, 1937(1937-03-04) (aged 62)
Chicago, Illinois
Nationality American
Education Art Institute of Chicago;
Art Students League of New York
Known for Sculpture

Alice Cooper (April 8, 1875 – March 4, 1937) was an American sculptor.

Early life and education[edit]

Cooper was born in Glenwood, Iowa and was raised in Denver, Colorado.[1]

She studied under Preston Powers (son of the sculptor Hiram Powers[2]) then at the Art Institute of Chicago with Lorado Taft and the Art Students League of New York through about 1901.

Career[edit]

Cooper is best known for her bronze figure of Sacajawea (Sacajawea and Jean-Baptiste) originally produced as the centerpiece for the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland, Oregon, 1905, unveiled in a ceremony attended by Susan B. Anthony and other prominent feminists.[3] This figure now stands in Washington Park.

Other work includes:

She displayed work at her alma mater, Art Institute of Chicago, as well as the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and the National Academy of Design.[1] Some of her works were sold by Tiffany & Co.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Cooper resided in Denver, Colorado, as well as Illinois and Iowa.[1] In 1905 she married Nathan M. Hubbard and moved to Des Moines, Iowa.[1] They had three daughters.[1]

She died on March 4, 1937 in Chicago,[1] Illinois, at age 62.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Kovinick, Phil; Yoshiki-Kovinick, Marian (eds.). "Alice Cooper". An Encyclopedia of Women Artists of the American West. Retrieved January 12, 2018 – via askart.com. 
  2. ^ Crane, Sylvia E. (1972). White Silence: Greenough, Powers and Crawford, American Sculptors in Nineteenth Century Italy. University of Miami Press. p. 266. ISBN 9780870241994. 
  3. ^ Fresonke, Kris; Spence, Mark David, eds. (2004). Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. University of California Press. p. 202. ISBN 9780520228399. Retrieved January 12, 2018 – via Google Books.