All-time World Games medal table

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This is the all-time medal table of the World Games as of the 2017 edition; in the history of the games, Russia (2001, 2005, 2009 and 2017) has led the total medal count four times, and Italy (1985, 1989 and 2013) three times. The United States have claimed that honor twice (1981 and 1997), while Germany (West Germany in the first three editions) led the overall count in 1993.[1][2][3][4][5][6] Ranked by gold, then silver, then bronze:

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1[a]  Italy 153 145 140 438
2  United States 143 131 109 383
3  Germany 137 111 141 389
4  Russia[b] 137 110 72 319
5  France 103 101 105 308
6  China 68 55 27 150
7  United Kingdom 59[c] 62 90 211
8  Japan 55 38 53 146
9  Ukraine 42[d] 47 36 125
10  Spain 41 43 42 126
11  Sweden 41[c] 37 51 129
12  Netherlands 40 42 50 132
13  South Korea 39 23 26 88
14  Australia 33 53 43 129
15  Belgium 31 38 41 110
16  Chinese Taipei 31 33 31 95
17  Colombia 29 39 27 95
18  Canada 21 24 36 81
19   Switzerland 20 30 17 67
20  Denmark 20 10 12 42
21  Hungary 16 15 23 54
22  Brazil 16 12[d] 13 41
23  Austria 15 22 20 57
24  Poland 15 15 23 53
25  Soviet Union[b] 15 13 8 36
26  Norway 14 18 33 65
27  Belarus 14 8 26 48
28  Bulgaria 14 3 11 28
29  Finland 11 22 23[e] 56
30  Czech Republic 11 14 19 44
31  New Zealand 10 13 11 34
32  Mexico 7 9 13 29
33  Slovenia 6 12 8 26
34  Egypt 6 11 19 36
35  South Africa 6 11 18 35
36  Argentina 5 8 13 26
37  Slovakia 5 8 8 21
38  Romania 5 8 2 15
39  Venezuela 5 7 11 23
40  Portugal 5 5 11 21
41  Kazakhstan 5 2 6 13
42  Thailand 4 10 6 20
43  Greece 4 8 3 15
44  Chile 4 5 4 13
45  Croatia 4 4 9 17
46  Mongolia 4 4 3 11
47  Malaysia 4 2 4 10
48  Lithuania 3 5 7 15
49  Ireland 3 4 5 12
50  Estonia 3 4 1 8
51  Turkey 3 3 12 18
52  Indonesia 3 1 7 11
53  Vietnam 3 1 0 4
54  Fiji 3 0 0 3
55  Iran 2 9 4 15[e]
56  Azerbaijan 2 2 2 6
57  Singapore 2 1 0 3
58  Morocco 2 0 5 7
59  Bosnia and Herzegovina 2 0 3 5
60  Serbia 2 0 1 3
61  Moldova 2 0 0 2
62  Philippines 1 5 5 11
63  Luxembourg 1 3 3 7
64  Qatar 1 1[d] 4 6
65  India 1 1 3 5
66  United Arab Emirates 1 1 2 4
67  Uzbekistan 1 1 1 3
68  Algeria 1 1 0 2
69  Peru 1 0 3 4
70  Guatemala 1 0 0 1
 Saudi Arabia 1 0 0 1
72  Hong Kong 0 3 1 4
 Jordan 0 3 1 4
74  Czechoslovakia 0 3 0 3
75  Israel 0 1 7 8
76  Ivory Coast 0 1 3 4
77  Ecuador 0 1 2 3
78  Bahrain 0 1 1 2
 Dominican Republic 0 1 1 2
 Madagascar 0 1 1 2
81  Latvia 0 1 0 1
 Liechtenstein 0 1 0 1
 San Marino 0 1 0 1
84  Montenegro 0 0 3 3
85  Jamaica 0 0 2 2
86  Bahamas 0 0 1 1
 El Salvador 0 0 1 1
 Kuwait 0 0 1 1
 Monaco 0 0 1 1
 Nigeria 0 0 1 1
 Pakistan 0 0 1 1
 Yugoslavia 0 0 1 1
Totals 1518 1502 1594 4614
  1. ^ The results from the 2001 World Games are from the archived website of the Akita, Japan, organizing committee.[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]
  2. ^ a b The Soviet Union, which amassed 36 total medals in 1989, is counted separately from its successor states, including Russia. This is consistent with the separate counting of medals for other states that sub-divided into their constituent successor states following their initial participation in the World Games, these include Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic and Slovakia) and Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro).
  3. ^ a b The 1981 mixed badminton title was won by a pair of players from Sweden and Great Britain. Both nations are counted as having won a gold medal.
  4. ^ a b c In 2009, Ukraine was stripped of two gold medals in bodybuilding for doping, and Qatar and Brazil were each stripped of a silver medal. This table does not include those stripped medals, and neither does it include possible reallocation of those medals, as the results at the World Games website do not reflect a reallocation.[16]
  5. ^ a b The 1993 bronze medalist in men's 75kg karate kumite bronze medal was from Iran, not Finland as stated in IWGA source.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Results of the World Games". International World Games Association. Retrieved 2015-10-26. 
  2. ^ "2009 Kaohsiung: Doping Violations". International World Games Association. Retrieved 2017-11-12. 
  3. ^ "The World Games 2009 Kaosiung (sic)". International Sumo Federation. Retrieved 2017-11-12. 
  4. ^ "The World Games 2013 Cali Medal Tally". sportresult.com. Retrieved 2015-10-26. 
  5. ^ "International Sumo Federation – World Games". Retrieved 2015-11-01. 
  6. ^ "World Games I Results". United Press International. 29 July 1981. 
  7. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Results/". Archived from the original on 2007-06-18. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  8. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Karate/Sparring/Open weight/Men August 18-19 / Tenno Town Gymnasium, Tenno Town, Japan". Archived from the original on 2005-12-15. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  9. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Karate/Sparring/-60kg/Women/ August 18-19 / Tenno Town Gymnasium, Tenno Town, Japan". Archived from the original on 2005-05-15. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  10. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Life Saving/Point Race/". Archived from the original on 2005-09-20. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  11. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Sport Boules/Petanque/Women/Doubles/ August 17-19 / World Games Plaza, Akita City, Japan". Archived from the original on 2005-09-10. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  12. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Water Ski/Tournament/Men/ August 23-25 / Ogata Water Ski Course, Ogata Village, Japan". Archived from the original on 2005-09-08. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  13. ^ "WORLD GAMES AKITA, JAPAN". 2001-08-26. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  14. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Roller Skating/Speed/Point+elimination 15,000m/Men/ August 24-26 / Akita Prefectural Skating Rink, Akita City, Japan". Archived from the original on 2005-09-14. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  15. ^ "The 6th World Games 2001.8.16-26 Roller Skating/Speed/Elimination 20,000m/Men/ August 24-26 / Akita Prefectural Skating Rink, Akita City, Japan". Archived from the original on 2005-09-09. Retrieved 2018-02-03. 
  16. ^ "2009 Kaohsiung: Doping Violations". International World Games Association. Retrieved 2017-11-12. 
  17. ^ "Saeid Ashtian". Retrieved 2018-02-04.