American Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Coach of the Year

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
American Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Coach of the Year
Given forThe most outstanding basketball coach in the American Athletic Conference
CountryUnited States
History
First award2014
Most recentKelvin Sampson, Houston

The American Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Coach of the Year is a basketball award given to the American Athletic Conference's most outstanding head coach. The conference formed in 2013–14 after many schools departed from the original Big East Conference to form their own conference. Mick Cronin of Cincinnati was the first-ever winner.[1]

Key[edit]

Awarded one of the following National Coach of the Year awards that year:

Associated Press Coach of the Year (AP)
Adolph Rupp Cup (ARC)
Basketball Times Coach of the Year (BT)
CBS/Chevrolet Coach of the Year (CBS)
Naismith Coach of the Year (N)
NABC Coach of the Year (NABC)
Sporting News Coach of the Year (SN)
U.S. Basketball Writers Association (USBWA)

Coach (X) Denotes the number of times the coach had been awarded the Coach of the Year award at that point
*
Elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a coach but is no longer active
*^
Active coach who has been elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame (as a coach)
Conf. W–L Conference win–loss record for that season
Conf. St.T Conference standing at year's end (Tdenotes a tie)
Overall W–L Overall win–loss record for that season
Season Team won the NCAA Division I National Championship


Winners[edit]

Season Player School National Coach of
the Year Awards
Conf.
W–L
Conf.
St.
Overall
W–L
Reference
2013–14 Mick Cronin Cincinnati 15–3 1stT 27–7 [1]
2014–15 Fran Dunphy Temple 13–5 3rdT 26–11 [2]
2015–16 Fran Dunphy (2) Temple 14–4 1st 21–12 [3]
2016–17 Tim Jankovich SMU 17–1 1st 30–5 [4]
2017–18 Kelvin Sampson Houston 14–4 2ndT 27–8 [5]
2018–19 Kelvin Sampson (2) Houston 16–2 1st 33–4 [6]

Winners by school[edit]

In this table, the "year joined" reflects the calendar year when each school joined the conference; the "Years" column reflects the calendar year in which each award was presented.

School (year joined) Winners Years
Temple (2013) 2 2015, 2016
Houston (2013) 2 2018, 2019
Cincinnati (2013) 1 2014
SMU (2013) 1 2017
Connecticut (2013) 0
East Carolina (2014) 0
Louisville (2013)[a 1] 0
Memphis (2013) 0
Rutgers (2013)[a 1] 0
South Florida (2013) 0
Tulane (2014) 0
Tulsa (2014) 0
UCF (2013) 0
Wichita State (2017) 0
  1. ^ a b Louisville and Rutgers played only the 2013–14 season in The American. In July 2014, they respectively left for the ACC[7] and Big Ten.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "UConn's Shabazz Napier Named American Athletic Conference Player of the Year". TheAmerican.org. American Athletic Conference. March 12, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2014.
  2. ^ "SMU's Nic Moore Named Men's Basketball Player of the Year". TheAmerican.org. American Athletic Conference. March 12, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  3. ^ "SMU's Nic Moore Named AAC's Top Player; Temple's Dunphy Top Coach". Hartford Courant. March 10, 2016. Retrieved March 10, 2016.
  4. ^ http://sidearm.sites.s3.amazonaws.com/theamerican.sidearmsports.com/documents/2016/11/17/2016_17_American_Men_s_Basketball_Weekly_Release.pdf
  5. ^ "Clark Named American Player of the Year, Williams Rookie of the Year & Sampson Coach of the Year - American Athletic Conference". Theamerican.org. Retrieved 2019-06-01.
  6. ^ "American Athletic Conference Awards Player, Freshman and Coach of the Year - American Athletic Conference". Theamerican.org. Retrieved 2019-06-01.
  7. ^ "ACC Extends Formal Invitation for Membership to the University of Louisville" (Press release). Atlantic Coast Conference. November 28, 2012. Archived from the original on December 12, 2012. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  8. ^ "Rutgers University To Join The Big Ten Conference" (Press release). Big Ten Conference. November 20, 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-11-27. Retrieved November 20, 2012.