Anthony Braga

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Anthony Allan Braga
Born 1969 (age 48–49)
Nationality American
Education University of Massachusetts (B.A., 1991), Rutgers University (M.A., 1993; Ph.D., 1997), Harvard University (M.P.A., 2002)
Awards International Association of Chiefs of Police's Community Policing Award and Excellence in Law Enforcement Research Award (both in 2011)
Scientific career
Fields Criminology
Institutions Northeastern University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Rutgers University
Thesis Solving violent crime problems: an evaluation of the Jersey City Police Department's pilot program to control violent places (1997)

Anthony Allan Braga (born 1969)[1] is an American criminologist and the director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University.

Education[edit]

Braga received his B.A. from the University of Massachusetts in 1991, his M.A. and Ph.D. from Rutgers in 1993 and 1997, respectively. He later received his M.P.A. from Harvard University in 2002.[2]

Career[edit]

Braga worked as a research associate at Rutgers University's Center for Crime Prevention Studies from 1993 to 1995, he then began working at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government as a research associate, where he has been a senior research fellow since July 2010. Also in July 2010, he joined Rutgers again as a professor of criminal justice, and became the Don M. Gottfredson Professor of Evidence-Based Criminology there in September 2012,[2] on July 1, 2016, he left Rutgers and Harvard to become the director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University.[3]

Research[edit]

Braga's research focuses on multiple topics in the field of criminology, including reducing criminals' access to guns, reducing gang-relatead violence, and crime control hot spots,[4] he has also designed a study on the effectiveness of police body-worn cameras. He has recommended that, to conduct this study, the New York Police Department put such cameras on some of its officers in 20 precincts and compare these officers to their counterparts in precincts where officers are not wearing cameras,[5] his research has also found that hot-spot policing is effective at reducing the crime rate.[6] In the 1990s, while a research associate at Harvard, he and his colleagues designed and implemented the anti-gang violence program Operation Ceasefire in Boston.[7] He has since published research showing that this program was associated with reductions in violence, but that this relationship may not be causal.[8]

Honors and awards[edit]

Braga's work with the Boston Police Department on its Safe Street Teams program led to him receiving the International Association of Chiefs of Police's Community Policing Award and Excellence in Law Enforcement Research Award, both in 2011.[4] He later received the Joan McCord Award from the American Society of Criminology's Division of Experimental Criminology in 2014.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anthony Braga". VIAF. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "Anthony Braga CV" (PDF). Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  3. ^ "Dr. Anthony Braga". Spotlight. Northeastern University School of Criminology & Criminal Justice. 
  4. ^ a b "Dr. Anthony A. Braga". Rutgers University. Archived from the original on 11 April 2012. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  5. ^ Shallwani, Pervais (2 March 2016). "NYPD Prepares to Expand Body Camera Use". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  6. ^ Tierney, John (26 January 2013). "Prison Population Can Shrink When Police Crowd Streets". New York Times. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  7. ^ Kornwitz, Jason (30 September 2016). "New professor has made crime prevention his life's work". Northeastern University. 
  8. ^ Matthews, Dylan (6 March 2013). "Chicago's murder rate is finally falling. Can that keep up?". Washington Post. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  9. ^ "AEC/DEC Awards". American Society of Criminology. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 

External links[edit]