Antisuyu

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Antisuyu (Quechua anti east, suyu region, part of a territory, each of the four regions which formed the Inca Empire,[1] "eastern region") was the eastern part of the Inca Empire which bordered on the modern-day Upper Amazon region which the Anti (people) inhabited. Antis is a collective term for the many varied ethnic groups living in the Antisuyu such as the Asháninka or the Tsimané. The second smallest of the suyus, Antisuyu, was located northwest of Cusco in the high Andes. Indeed, it is the root of the word “Andes.”[2] Along with Chinchaysuyu, it was part of the Hanan Suyukuna or "upper quarters" of the empire.[3][4]

Most of the lowland jungle was not part of Tawantinsuyu. Only the jungle region could not be dominated by the Incas, given that they could not colonize the jungle region. Arguably, the first organized and planned naval action of Peru, was in time of the Sapa Inca Tupac Inca Yupanqui, as it mobilized 10,000 men and their supplies on large rafts navigating the rivers, a task that took two years, After that campaign, he went to the rupa rupa of the Chunchus, which was a catastrophe for the Incas, since, according some authors, only 1,000 soldiers returned alive. After subjugating the Chunchus, very few arrived at Musu.[5]

Wamani[edit]

The four suyus of the Inca empire. Antisuyu appears in green.

Each suyu was divided into wamani, or provinces. Antisuyu included the wamani of:

[6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary)
  2. ^ D’Altroy, Terence N. (2005). The Incas. Blackwell Publishing: Malden, p. 86-87
  3. ^ D’Altroy, Terence N. (2005). The Incas. Blackwell Publishing: Malden, p. 42-43, 86-89
  4. ^ Steward, Julian H. & Faron, Louis, C. (1959). Native Peoples of South America. McGraw-Hill: New York, p. 185-192
  5. ^ Vega, Garcilaso de la (2014-05-12). Royal Commentaries of the Incas and General History of Peru, Volume 1 and. University of Texas Press. ISBN 9780292767027. 
  6. ^ D’Altroy, Terence N. (2005). The Incas. Blackwell Publishing: Malden, p. 42-43, 86-89
  7. ^ Steward, Julian H. & Faron, Louis, C. (1959). Native Peoples of South America. McGraw-Hill: New York, p. 185-192