SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Schleicher ASH 31

The ASH 31 is a single seat Open Class glider which can be flown in the 18 metre class configuration. The ASH 31 was announced at the end of 2008 by Alexander Schleicher; the glider was developed as a replacement for the ASH 26. The self-launching Mi version is powered by a 41 kW Wankel engine; the improvements over the ASH 26 and ASG 29 are given as: Extended ailerons Redesigned wing structure ASH 31 Production aircraft with 18-metre or 21-metre wingspan. ASH 31 Mi The motor-glider production aircraft with 18-metre or 21-metre wingspan, capable of self launching with an engine and retractable propeller. Data from Schleicher. General characteristics Crew: One Capacity: 115 kg max. pilot weight 140 kg max. water ballast in the wing Length: 7.07 m Wingspan: 21 m including winglets Wing area: 13.2 m2 Aspect ratio: 33.5 Empty weight: 430 kg Max takeoff weight: 700 kg Fuel capacity: 16 l in fuselage fuel tank 46 l with 2 wing fuel tanks Powerplant: 1 × Austro Engine IAE 50R-AA single rotor Wankel engine, 41 kW Propellers: 2-bladed, 1.55 m diameter Performance Rate of climb: 4 m/s Lift-to-drag: 56 Wing loading: 53.0 kg/m2 max Aircraft of comparable role and era Jonker JS-1 Revelation Lange Antares 23E Schempp-Hirth Quintus Related lists List of gliders Schleicher website

Catherine Pollard (Scouting)

Catherine "Kay" N. Pollard was the first female Scoutmaster in the Boy Scouts of America, she led Boy Scout Troop 13 in Milford, from 1973 to 1975 but the BSA refused to recognize her as a Scoutmaster until 1988. Pollard had tried to register as Scoutmaster in 1974 and 1976. Troop 13 in Milford dissolved when nobody else stepped up to be Scoutmaster, her 1980s court case drew international attention. In January 1984 the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities ruled she had the right to be a Scoutmaster, but in May 1986 a judge overturned that ruling on the grounds boys needed a male role model and that BSA had the right to make its own rules since it was a private organization; the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in favor of the BSA on July 6, 1987. On February 11, 1988, the Boy Scouts of America abolished gender requirements on all volunteer positions, ending Pollard's 14-year legal battle. Pollard stated: "I do think that this is marvelous," she said at the time, "because there have been women all over the United States, in fact all over the world, that have been doing these things for the Boy Scouts because they could not get a male leader, but we could not get recognition for the things we’ve done."

She died on December 13, 2006 in Seminole and was buried in Milford. For her funeral in Milford on December 18, 2006, her casket was carried on a Milford fire truck, she had served the fire department as a volunteer in several positions, including bugler, for many years and when the BSA allowed female Scoutmasters, it was the Milford Fire Department that sponsored a Boy Scout troop so she could be a Scoutmaster. Pollard's other interests included motorcycling, supporting veteran's issues and chicken farming