Arthur Langton

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Arthur Langton
Arthur Langton c1935.jpg
Langton c. 1935
Personal information
Full nameArthur Chudleigh Beaumont Langton
Born(1912-03-02)2 March 1912
Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa
Died27 November 1942(1942-11-27) (aged 30)
Maiduguri, Nigeria
NicknameChud
Height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm fast-medium
Right-arm medium
International information
National side
Career statistics
Competition Tests First-class
Matches 15 52
Runs scored 298 1218
Batting average 15.68 19.96
100s/50s 0/2 0/7
Top score 73* 73*
Balls bowled 4199 11317
Wickets 40 193
Bowling average 45.67 25.74
5 wickets in innings 1 9
10 wickets in match 0 2
Best bowling 5/58 6/53
Catches/stumpings 8/- 41/-
Source: Cricinfo, 16 April 2018

Arthur Chudleigh Beaumont "Chud" Langton (2 March 1912 – 27 November 1942) was a South African cricketer who played in 15 Tests from 1935 to 1939.[1] Jack Fingleton rated him amongst the best medium-paced bowlers he ever saw.

Langton was educated at King Edward VII School, Johannesburg.[2] A tall, red-headed all-rounder, he came to prominence on the tour of England in 1935, when he made his Test debut. In the Second Test at Lord's he took 2 for 58 and 4 for 31 and made 44 batting at number eight in the second innings, valuable contributions to South Africa's first-ever Test victory in England, and subsequently to their 1–0 series victory.[3][4] In the "Timeless Test" in Durban in 1938–39, he bowled 91 eight-ball overs, including 56 with a strapped back during the second innings, placing him fifth on the all-time list of most balls bowled in a Test: 728.[3]

He died in Nigeria at the age of 30 while serving as a flight lieutenant with the South African Air Force in World War II, when his Lockheed B34 Ventura bomber spun and crashed on landing.[5][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arthur Langton". www.cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 11 January 2012.
  2. ^ McCrery, Nigel (2017). The Coming Storm: Test and First-Class Cricketers Killed in World War Two. Barnsley: Pen & Sword Books. p. 143. ISBN 978-1-5267-0695-9.
  3. ^ a b c Lazenby, John (2017). Edging Towards Darkness: The story of the last timeless Test. Bloomsbury Publishing. pp. 236–38. ISBN 978-1-4729-4129-9.
  4. ^ "2nd Test, South Africa tour of England at London, Jun 29 – Jul 2 1935". Cricinfo. Retrieved 16 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Casualty Details: Langton, A.B.C." Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Retrieved 20 May 2018.

External links[edit]