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Beauty and the Beast (1991 film)

Beauty and the Beast is a 1991 American animated musical romantic fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 30th Disney animated feature film and the third released during the Disney Renaissance period, it is based on the French fairy tale of the same name by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont, ideas from the 1946 French film of the same name directed by Jean Cocteau. Beauty and the Beast focuses on the relationship between the Beast, a prince, magically transformed into a monster and his servants into household objects as punishment for his arrogance, Belle, a young woman whom he imprisons in his castle to become a prince again. To break the curse, Beast must learn to love Belle and earn her love in return before the last petal falls from an enchanted rose or else the Beast will remain a monster forever; the film features the voices of Richard White, Jerry Orbach, David Ogden Stiers, Angela Lansbury. Walt Disney first attempted to adapt Beauty and the Beast into an animated film during the 1930s and 1950s, but was unsuccessful.

Following the success of The Little Mermaid, Walt Disney Pictures decided to adapt the fairy tale, which Richard Purdum conceived as a non-musical. Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg dismissed Purdum's idea and ordered that the film be a musical similar to The Little Mermaid instead; the film was directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise, with a screenplay by Linda Woolverton story first credited to Roger Allers. Lyricist Howard Ashman and composer Alan Menken wrote the film's songs. Ashman, who additionally served as the film's executive producer, died of AIDS-related complications six months before the film's release, the film is thus dedicated to his memory. Beauty and the Beast premiered as an unfinished film at the New York Film Festival on September 29, 1991, followed by its theatrical release as a completed film at the El Capitan Theatre on November 13; the film grossed $425 million at the box office worldwide on a $25 million budget and was met with widespread critical acclaim toward its romantic narrative, animation and musical numbers.

Beauty and the Beast won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, the first animated film to win that category. It became the first animated film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture at the 64th Academy Awards, where it won the Academy Award for Best Original Score and Best Original Song for its title song and received additional nominations for Best Original Song and Best Sound. In April 1994, Beauty and the Beast became Disney's first animated film to be adapted into a Broadway musical; the success of the film spawned two direct-to-video follow-ups: Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas and Beauty and the Beast: Belle's Magical World, both of which take place in the timeline of the original. This was followed by a spin-off television series. An IMAX version of the film was released in 2002, included "Human Again", a new five-minute musical sequence, included in the 1994 musical; that same year, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally or aesthetically significant".

After the success of the 3D re-release of The Lion King, the film was reissued in 3D in 2012. A live-action adaptation of the film directed by Bill Condon was released on March 17, 2017. An enchantress disguised as a beggar woman arrives at a French castle and offers a cruel and selfish prince a rose in return for shelter; when he refuses, she reveals her true identity. To punish the prince for his lack of compassion, the enchantress metamorphoses him into a beast and his servants into household objects, she casts a spell on the rose and warns the prince that the spell will only be broken if he learns to love another and earn her love in return before the last petal falls in his 21st year, or else he will remain a beast forever. Ten years in a nearby village, a beautiful, book-loving girl named Belle dreams of adventure and wants more than the little village can offer, she is seen as an outsider by the villagers. Despite her oddness, she is beautiful and continually brushes off advances from Gaston, a handsome and narcissistic hunter as well as his bumbling sidekick Lefou.

On his way to a fair and lost in the forest, Belle's father Maurice seeks refuge in the Beast's castle, but the Beast imprisons him for trespassing. When Maurice's horse returns without him, Belle ventures out in search for him, finds him locked in the castle dungeon; the Beast agrees to let her take Maurice's place. Belle befriends the castle's royal servants; when she wanders into the forbidden west wing and finds the rose, the enraged Beast scares her into fleeing the castle. In the woods, she is ambushed by a pack of wolves, but the Beast rescues her, is injured in the process; as Belle nurses his wounds, a friendship develops between them, they become close and get close to falling in love. Meanwhile, Maurice returns to the village and fails to convince the townsfolk of Belle's predicament. Gaston bribes Monsieur D'Arque, the warden of the town's insane asylum to have Maurice locked up if Belle refuses to marry Gaston, which D'Arque delightedly accepts. After sharing a romantic dance with the Beast, Belle discovers her father collapsing in the woods using a magic mirror.

The Beast releases her to save Maurice. After taking Maurice to the village, an angry mob led by Gaston and Monsieur D'Arque arrive to arrest M

Chambers–Robinson House

The Chambers–Robinson House is a historic house located at 910 Montgomery Avenue in Sheffield, Alabama. The house was built in 1890 by Judson G. Chambers, sold to Charles and Dora Robinson in 1898. In 1923, the Robinsons' daughter Caroline and her husband Samuel Cooke built a house one block away, converted the original house to apartments, they sold the new house in 1940, lived in the original house until their deaths. The Cookes' daughter sold the house in 1962, it has remained outside the family since; the house was built in Queen Anne style with some Eastlake details. The two-story frame house has a steeply pitched hipped roof supported by decorative brackets and pierced by several dormers. A porch wraps around the left corner of the house, features elaborate posts and latticework; the entry hall features a grand Eastlake staircase. The house was listed on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in 1992, on the National Register of Historic Places on May 14, 1993

List of Indian archers

This is a list of Indian archers. Muskan Kirar Raj Kaur Jyothi Surekha VennamMah Laqa Bai Dola Banerjee Ankita Bhakat Rimil Buriuly Krishna Das Trisha Deb Divya Dhayal Nisha Rani Dutta Jhano Hansdah P. K. Jayalakshmi Gagandeep Kaur Deepika Kumari Madhumita Kumari Reena Kumari Bombayla Devi Laishram Purnima Mahato Laxmirani Majhi Lily Chanu Paonam Jayalakshmi Sarikonda Sumangala Sharma Purvasha Shende Chekrovolu Swuro Pranitha Vardhineni Jyothi Surekha Vennam Rahul Banerjee Mangal Singh Champia Thalakkal Chanthu Rajat ChauhanAtanu DasGora HoSandeep Kumar Cherukuri LeninShyam Lal Meena Sanand MitraSatyadev PrasadTarundeep Rai Limba RamMajhi Sawaiyan Sanjeeva Kumar SinghJayanta TalukdarAbhishek Verma Atul Verma Vishwas