Bend, British Columbia

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Bend, British Columbia
Railway Point
Bend, British Columbia is located in British Columbia
Bend, British Columbia
Location of Bend in British Columbia
Coordinates: 53°46′00″N 121°04′00″W / 53.76667°N 121.06667°W / 53.76667; -121.06667Coordinates: 53°46′00″N 121°04′00″W / 53.76667°N 121.06667°W / 53.76667; -121.06667
Country Canada
Province British Columbia
Land District Cariboo
Regional District Fraser-Fort George
Geographic Region Robson Valley
Area code(s) 250, 778

Bend is the remnants of a community located two miles northwest of Dome Creek in central British Columbia, which comprises several scattered houses stretching along the north side of the Fraser River. The area was named after the 90 degree curve on the railway tracks, a mile northwest of the railway bridge.[1]

Transportation[edit]

It is a flag stop for Via Rail's Jasper – Prince Rupert train.[2]

History[edit]

Railway[edit]

Bend, like Guilford to its northwest, and Kidd to its southeast, was an original train station (1914) on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway[3] (the Canadian National Railway after nationalization). In 1931, while searching with her husband for stray horses on the tracks at the rail bridge, Mrs. P.J. Strand was struck and killed by a train;[4] in 1948, another rail accident occurred when two forestry speeders carrying 17 men to a forest fire at Loos collided near Bend, resulting in hospitalizations.[5] A flag stop by the 1950s,[6] it has maintained that status.[7][8]

Community[edit]

The school, located near the train station, opened in 1925, with Miss Alfreda Larsen as the inaugural teacher.[9] Becoming part of the former McBride School District in 1945, it closed the following year, having 11 students in grades 1-8. Thereafter, students attended the Dome Creek School. A scheduled reopening for 1948 did not transpire, because no suitable teachers were available.[10] School District 57 initiated disposal of the surplus school site at Bend in 1984.[11] Schoolchildren would cross the Fraser on the ice in winter and by boat in summer, during spring, the hazardous railway bridge provided the only crossing point.[12]

Fred Hanson was the inaugural postmaster (1930-31), with Hans Bernhardt Hanson assuming the position (1931-42) on his death, the post-office closing 5 months after his resignation,[13] Hans Hanson also operated a general store (1928-42).[14]

Opened in 1941, the community hall hosted various functions;[15] in his role as rector of All Saints Anglican, McBride, Rev. J.J. Cowan sometimes held evening services in the Bend schoolhouse,[16] a venue also used for dances during the 1940s.[17]

Forestry[edit]

The narrow strip of accessible spruce forest bordering the railway that stretched some 100 miles east of Prince George was known as the East Line.[18]

The York Lumber Co. commenced operations in the 1923/24 winter.[19] Auctioned at a receiver’s sale of the mill,[20] Wallace N. Jaeck of Longworth offered the highest bid.[21] With his son, C. Earl Jaeck, he opened an enlarged mill in August, 1928,[22] which operated as the Bend Lumber Co;[23] in 1934, John F. McMillan purchased a controlling interest in the company.[24] A Board of Trade delegation included this 45,000-feet capacity mill on their 1937 tour.[25] Rory (Roy) R.M. McGillivray (1903-1994),[26] and family arrived that year.[27] C. Earl Jaeck, a cousin of Roy’s wife Elizabeth,[28] was the president of the mill and Roy became the manager.

In 1938, Donald Jaeck, Earl’s 12-year-old son, died of appendicitis,[29] the following year, Leonard H. Jaeck, former Longworth resident, and Earl’s uncle,[30] suffered a fractured leg while working for the company.[31] Also, Patrick Murdock, the mill accountant, collapsed at his desk and died.[32] Earl’s wife, daughter of lumber pioneer Eugene Bashaw,[33] headed the local Red Cross fundraising effort during World War II.[34]

In 1942, when a 60 mph wind swept through the area, toppled trees fell on telephone wires, cutting off communication with the outside, the gale dispersed embers from the mill burner into the mill building and across the settlement, razing the sawmill, finished lumber, the village, and a number of railway freight cars on the siding. Only the cookhouse, a small dwelling and some shacks remained, it also created spot fires in Dome Creek across the Fraser. Most of the men were away fighting forest fires. Relief supplies for the 200 victims, who had lost everything, were dispatched from McBride,[35] garnering praise for the Red Cross and Salvation Army,[36] over the following years, salvageable material was reclaimed from the site.[37] The mill not rebuilt, only the farming community and those working in Dome Creek remained.

Hunting & Farming[edit]

Martin (Deafy) Dayton was a larger than life trapper[38] and key organizer for the trappers’ dance held annually in Prince George,[39] he pressed charges against unscrupulous trappers who looted his possessions and prey.[40] When not trapping, he grew strawberries,[41] and advised hunters on prime locations, he resided in the Bend postal area, after relocating from Aleza Lake.[42][43]

Oscar Benson traveled by scow from Tête Jaune to Fort George around 1913/14, and proceeded to take up a preemption at Bend, where he built a log cabin. Oscar and Siri, who married in 1919, farmed their quarter section near the railway bridge,[44] their children raised in Bend were Carrie S. (1923-2012)[45] and Carl A. (1928-2015).[46] Carrie initially relocated to work in the Penny Sawmills' office,[47][48] where in due course she married Arne Mellows of Penny, both having most recently resided in Vancouver.[49] Breaking his leg in an industrial accident at the Dome Creek sawmill, Carl spent a year at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver),[50] before returning.[51] By 1948, all three were residing in Penny.[52] Oscar (1892-1950) & Siri Benson (1893-1978) remained Bend residents until early1950.[53]

James B. & Adeline (1891-1979) Hooker arrived in 1913 with their three eldest children, and established a farm[54] at Bend.[55] In 1920, a physical altercation with Mrs. Bremner of Dome Creek occurred.[56] James became a well-known hunter, trapper and guide,[57] catering to American parties;[58] in 1940, James accompanied a constable in a futile search of 130 miles of the Fraser River bars and banks for a missing logger, who was presumed drowned.[59] When the Rotary barrel was floated the 145 miles from Dome Creek/Bend to Prince George in 1943, 1944 and 1945, James was the official monitor for the first half of the journey,[60] on his death in 1955,[61] Adeline remained[62] until moving to Prince George, where she died in 1979,[63] their children were Cora, Lawrence, Ruth, Edward,[64] Glen, Allen, Marion, Elizabeth, Kenneth, Clifford and Clarence.

Cora E. married Stewart Ganton and moved to Prince George, but Cora and their four children resided in Sinclair Mills while Stewart served (1939-45). They returned to the Dome Creek area during the 1960s. Stewart died in 1973 and Cora in 1977.[65] Ruth married Wentworth Stephen Ganton and moved extensively with their children. When he died in 1969, she had long relocated to Los Angeles, being Ruth Hardin at her death in 1979.[66] Lawrence (Larry) J. (1911-2001) married Thelma Dorene Hutchinson in 1934 and they settled in Sinclair Mills, where he worked as a guide, trapper and mill employee. One child did not survive infancy; in 1942, the family relocated to California.[67]

Edward was the firstborn after his parents arrived at Bend, he teamed up with his father as a guide and outfitter. It was as a logger, breaking up a logjam, that he slipped and drowned. Only 21, his body was found over seven months later.[68] Glen B. served (1945-46), married Myra, and started a family. He was a principal of Hooker Bros Sawmill in the 1950s to early 1960s, and remained in the Dome Creek area.[69] Allen, at 12, saved a companion from drowning in the river,[70] the absence of any further reference to him suggests he died prematurely. Marion (1924-2002) worked in Vancouver, returned and married Jim Chambers of Penny in 1946, they spent their young married life raising their children in the Dome Creek area, before relocating.[71] Elizabeth (Bette) Rose, enlisting in the CWAC in 1942, relocated to the coast. Married to Lyell Alexander Winters, they raised their children, after his death in 1977, she remarried.[72]

Kenneth W. served (1944-46), remarried and started a family. He partnered in the Hooker Bros Sawmill in the 1950s to early 1960s, and remained in the Dome Creek area. A hunting guide, he built a lodge and was critical of clearcuts; in the 1980s, he was fined for baiting bears and his guide licence was suspended for three years.[73] Clifford relocated to Vancouver and died in an industrial accident in his late teens.[74] Clarence C. served in the Korean War, married Jean Louise Turner in 1954, and had children. Settling in the Dome Creek area, he was a logging contractor. While Jean cooked at the Hooker Bros. camp, he hauled logs for Nance Lumber. The family relocated to Prince George, they died respectively in 1993 and 2001.[75]

Roads, Telephones & Electricity[edit]

No outside road access has existed, however people have illegally driven vehicles across the CNR rail bridge. To save on transportation costs, Doug Abernethy of Guilford Lumber once drove a small Cat dozer over the bridge, but was able to talk his way out of being charged.[76] On the subject of telephones & electricity, refer to Dome Creek


Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Prince George Citizen, 20 Feb 2013
  2. ^ "Bend train station". VIA Rail. 
  3. ^ http://www.railwaystationlists.co.uk/pdfcanada/britishcolumbiarlys.pdf
  4. ^ Prince George Citizen: 13 & 27 Aug 1931
  5. ^ Prince George Citizen, 24 Jun 1948
  6. ^ Prince George Citizen, 19 Dec 1955
  7. ^ http://streamlinermemories.info/CAN/CN61TT.pdf, p. 39
  8. ^ http://www.traingeek.ca/timetableshow.php?id=cn_19661030&pagenum=40&nosmall=0&showlarge=1
  9. ^ Prince George Citizen, 20 Feb 2013
  10. ^ Prince George Citizen, 20 Feb 2013
  11. ^ Prince George Citizen, 26 Sep 1984
  12. ^ Prince George Citizen, 19 Feb 1987
  13. ^ https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/postal-heritage-philately/post-offices-postmasters/Pages/item.aspx?IdNumber=14818&
  14. ^ Prince George Citizen, 4 Feb 1943
  15. ^ Prince George Citizen: 23 Oct 1941, 6 Nov 1941 & 25 Dec 1941
  16. ^ Prince George Citizen: 30 Oct 1941 & 27 Nov 1941
  17. ^ Prince George Citizen: 14 Dec 1944 & 27 Sep 1945
  18. ^ http://summit.sfu.ca, p.14
  19. ^ Prince George Citizen: 22 Nov 1923 & 24 Jan 1924
  20. ^ Prince George Citizen: 7 & 14 May 1925
  21. ^ Prince George Citizen, 28 May 1925
  22. ^ Prince George Citizen, 23 Aug 1928
  23. ^ Prince George Citizen: 22 Mar 1928 & 2 May 88
  24. ^ Prince George Citizen, 10 May 1934
  25. ^ Prince George Citizen, 26 Aug 1937
  26. ^ Prince George Citizen, 8 Jun 1994
  27. ^ A Penny for…, p. 127
  28. ^ Prince George Citizen, 15 Dec 1949
  29. ^ Prince George Citizen, 9 Jun 1938
  30. ^ Prince George Citizen, 1 Feb 1954
  31. ^ Prince George Citizen, 10 Aug 1939
  32. ^ Prince George Citizen, 26 Oct 1939
  33. ^ Prince George Citizen, 29 Dec 1938
  34. ^ Prince George Citizen, 27 Mar 1941
  35. ^ Prince George Citizen, 9 Jul 1942
  36. ^ Prince George Citizen, 16 Jul 1942
  37. ^ Prince George Citizen: 18 Feb 1943 & 19 Oct 1944
  38. ^ Prince George Citizen: 15 Apr 1926 & 6 Jun 1929
  39. ^ Prince George Citizen: 21 Jun 1928; & 6, 13 & 20 Jun 1929
  40. ^ Prince George Citizen: 27 Jun 1929; & 3 & 10 Oct 1929
  41. ^ Prince George Citizen: 25 Jul 1929 & 14 May 1931
  42. ^ Prince George Leader: 3 & 23 Nov 1922; & 4 Jan 1923
  43. ^ Prince George Citizen: 12 Oct 1939; & 6 & 13 Jun 1940
  44. ^ Prince George Citizen: 29 Apr 1937 & 10 Feb 2015
  45. ^ Prince George Citizen, 12 Dec 2012
  46. ^ Prince George Citizen, 4 Dec 2015
  47. ^ Prince George Citizen, 22 Apr 1943
  48. ^ A Penny for…, p. 163
  49. ^ Prince George Citizen, 5 Sep 1946
  50. ^ Prince George Citizen, 10 Feb 2015
  51. ^ Prince George Citizen, 2 Aug 1945
  52. ^ Prince George Citizen, 27 May 1948
  53. ^ Prince George Citizen: 21 Sep 1950, 5 Apr 1978 & 10 Feb 2015
  54. ^ Prince George Citizen: 2, 9 & 16 Dec 1943; & 9 Jun 1955
  55. ^ Prince George Citizen: 26 Aug 1937; 1 Jun 1939; 30 May1940; 1 Aug 1940; 7 Nov 1940; 24 Apr 1941; 21 May 1942; 19 & 26 Oct 1944; 15 Mar 1945; 5 Apr 1945; 31 Jan 1946; & 8 Aug 1946
  56. ^ Prince George Citizen, 14 May 1920
  57. ^ Prince George Citizen: 9 Jun 1938, 29 Dec 1938, & 27 May 1943
  58. ^ Prince George Citizen: 12 May 1938, 16 Mar 1939, 17 Jul 1941, 19 Oct 1944, 7 Nov 1946, 15 May 1947 & 8 Jan 1948
  59. ^ Prince George Citizen, 2 May 1940
  60. ^ Prince George Citizen: 8 Jul 1943, 6 Jul 1944 & 12 Jul 1945
  61. ^ Prince George Citizen: 6 & 9 June 1955
  62. ^ Prince George Citizen: 16 Sep 1958 & 28 Oct 1958,
  63. ^ Prince George Citizen, 27 Feb 1979
  64. ^ http://central.bac-lac.gc.ca/.item/?app=Census1921&op=img&id=e002868786
  65. ^ Prince George Citizen: 13 Sep 1945, 2 May 1946, 22 Aug 1969 & 7 Feb 1996
  66. ^ Prince George Citizen: 29 Jul 1926, 7 Oct 1943, 7 Dec 1944, 22 Mar 1945, 12 Jul 1945, 26 Sep 1946, 9 Jun 1955, 22 Aug 1969, 27 Feb 1979 & 9 Mar 1979
  67. ^ Prince George Citizen: 28 Jul 1927, 8 Feb 1934, 30 Mar 1939, 6 Apr 1939, 10 Aug 1939, 28 Dec 1939, 27 Feb 1979, 18 Sep 1993 & 7 Sep 2001
  68. ^ Prince George Citizen, 13 May 1937
  69. ^ Prince George Citizen: 2 Aug 1945; 6 Sep 1945; 31 Jan 1946; 26 Jun 1947; 19 & 22 Feb 1962; 1, 9, 15 & 22 Oct 1964; 23 Oct 1968; 27 Feb 1979, 18 Sep 1993, 18 Nov 1999, 7 Sep 2001 & 30 Dec 2002
  70. ^ Prince George Citizen, 30 Aug 1934
  71. ^ Prince George Citizen: 16 Mar 1939, 22 Apr 1943, 26 Aug 1943, 11 May 1944, 9 Nov 1944, 26 Sep 1946, 9 Jun 1955, 27 Feb 1979, 18 Sep 1993 & 7 Nov 2001
  72. ^ Prince George Citizen: 30 May 1940, 1 Oct 1942, 10 Jun 1943, 23 Aug 1945, 22 May 1947, 9 Jun 1955, 12 Jan 1977, 27 Feb 1979, 18 Sep 1993, 7 Nov 2001 & 30 Dec 2002
  73. ^ Prince George Citizen: 17 Feb 1944; 7 Dec 1944; 23 Aug 1945; 31 Jan 1946; 20, 24 & 27 Nov 1952; 28 Jan 1959; 19 & 22 Feb 1962; 10 Jul 1973; 27 Feb 1979, 29 Nov 1982, 30 Aug 1983, 18 Sep 1993, 7 Nov 2001 & 30 Dec 2002
  74. ^ Prince George Citizen: 10 Jun 1943, 2 Aug 1945, & 15 & 22 May 1947
  75. ^ Prince George Citizen: 29 Jun 1944, 22 Feb 1945, 8 Aug 1946, 12 Jun 1952, 6 Jul 1953, 8 Apr 1954, 7 Oct 1954, 1 Mar 1956, 5 Feb 1958, 8 Oct 1958, 28 Jan 1959, 27 Feb 1979, 18 Sep 1993 & 30 Jun 2001
  76. ^ Boudreau, Clarence & Olga. (2003). Into the Mists of Time. Self-published. p. 15


References[edit]