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Biocide

A biocide is defined in the European legislation as a chemical substance or microorganism intended to destroy, render harmless, or exert a controlling effect on any harmful organism. The US Environmental Protection Agency uses a different definition for biocides as "a diverse group of poisonous substances including preservatives, insecticides and pesticides used for the control of organisms that are harmful to human or animal health or that cause damage to natural or manufactured products"; when compared, the two definitions imply the same, although the US EPA definition includes plant protection products and some veterinary medicines. The terms "biocides" and "pesticides" are interchanged, confused with "plant protection products". To clarify this, pesticides include both biocides and plant protection products, where the former refers to substances for non-food and feed purposes and the latter refers to substances for food and feed purposes; when discussing biocides a distinction should be made between the biocidal active substance and the biocidal product.

The biocidal active substances are chemical compounds, but can be microorganisms. Biocidal products contain one or more biocidal active substances and may contain other non-active co-formulants that ensure the effectiveness as well as the desired pH, colour, etc. of the final product. Biocidal products are available on the market for use by professional and/or non-professional consumers. Although most of the biocidal active substances have a relative high toxicity, there are examples of active substances with low toxicity, such as CO2, which exhibit their biocidal activity only under certain specific conditions such as in closed systems. In such cases, the biocidal product is the combination of the active substance and the device that ensures the intended biocidal activity, i.e. suffocation of rodents by CO2 in a closed system trap. Another example of biocidal products available to consumers are products impregnated with biocides, such as clothes and wristbands impregnated with insecticides, socks impregnated with antibacterial substances etc.

Biocides are used in medicine, agriculture and industry. Biocidal substances and products are employed as anti-fouling agents or disinfectants under other circumstances: chlorine, for example, is used as a short-life biocide in industrial water treatment but as a disinfectant in swimming pools. Many biocides are synthetic, but there are occurring biocides classified as natural biocides, derived from, e.g. bacteria and plants. A biocide can be: A pesticide: this includes fungicides, insecticides, molluscicides, miticides and slimicides. An antimicrobial: this includes germicides, antibacterials, antifungals and antiparasites. See spermicide. In Europe the biocidal products are divided into different product types, based on their intended use; these product types, 22 in total under the BPR, are grouped into four main groups, namely disinfectants, pest control, other biocidal products. For example, the main group "disinfectants" contains products to be used for human hygiene and veterinary hygiene, main group "preservatives" contains wood preservatives, the main group "for pest control" contains rodenticides and repellents and attractants, while the main group "other biocidal products" contains antifouling products.

It should noted that one active substance can be used in several product types, such as for example sulfuryl fluoride, approved for use as a wood preservative as well as an insecticide. Biocides can be added to other materials to protect them against biological growth. For example, certain types of quaternary ammonium compounds are added to pool water or industrial water systems to act as an algicide, protecting the water from infestation and growth of algae, it is impractical to store and use poisonous chlorine gas for water treatment, so alternative methods of adding chlorine are used. These include hypochlorite solutions, which release chlorine into the water, compounds like sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione, sometimes referred to as "dichlor", trichloro-s-triazinetrione, sometimes referred to as "trichlor"; these compounds are stable while may be used in powdered, granular, or tablet form. When added in small amounts to pool water or industrial water systems, the chlorine atoms hydrolyze from the rest of the molecule forming hypochlorous acid which acts as a general biocide killing germs, micro-organisms, so on.

Halogenated hydantoin compounds are used as biocides. Because biocides are intended to kill living organisms, many biocidal products pose significant risk to human health and welfare. Great care is required when handling biocides and appropriate protective clothing and equipment should be used; the use of biocides can have significant adverse effects on the natural environment. Anti-fouling paints those utilising organic tin compounds such as TBT, have been shown to have severe and long-lasting impacts on marine eco-systems and such materials are now banned in many countries for commercial and recreational vessels. Disposal of used or unwanted biocides must be undertaken to avoid serious and long-lasting damage to the environment; the classification of biocides in the Biocidal Products Regulation 528/2012) is broken down into 22 product types, with several comprising mult

Heydar Aliyev Park, Ganja

Heydar Aliyev Park Complex is the largest urban park in Ganja, Azerbaijan located on an area of 450 hectares. It includes within its boundaries fountains and decorated garden plots, an amphitheater, “Triumphal arch”, Youth Center, Heydar Aliyev Center, Museum of Modern Art, a waterfall and an artificial lake in addition to thousands of trees; the Park Complex was opened in 2014. The park was founded as a “Memorial park” in March 1979 in the result of planting trees for the first time in the field called “Quru Qobu” of Yeni Ganja residential area by a group of people from Ganja during a rally; that Park started to be called “Heydar Park” dedicated to the late president of Azerbaijan, Heydar Aliyev after he visited Ganja in 1980 as the First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Azerbaijan SSR and planted plane trees in this park. The reconstruction of the park started in 2012. Between 2012 and 2014, the park expanded and transformed into a park complex covering an area of 450 hectares with 2 km length.

An amphitheater, “Triumphal arch”, a youth center, Heydar Aliyev Center, Museum of Modern Art, children’s entertainment area and an artificial lake were constructed, trees were planted within the boundaries of the park during the reconstruction period. The park complex inaugurated in January 2014; the park contains more than 350 thousand trees and decorative plants, including Oriental plane, spruce and fruit trees, as well as, 17 fountains, 32 decorated garden plots, a 4-step waterfall, statues and monuments of outstanding Azerbaijani poets and public figures, including statues to Nizami Ganjavi, Mahsati Ganjavi, Mirza Shafi Vazeh and Samad Vurghun. There is a cycling road in 7 kilometers long passing throughout the Park complex; the structures within the park complex include: The Main Alley with 53 meters width and 1400 meters length, passing through the Triumphal Arch, continues to the end of the complex where it leads to the Heydar Aliyev Center. The 16 fountains of the park are lined with 24 decorative 12.6 meters height lamp posts made of granite in this alley.

Triumphal Arch – was constructed on an area 1100 sq.m with the width of 20 meters, the length of 50 meters, the height of 38 meters on the pan stones. It has two facades -- west. Glasses prettified with geometric ornaments have been used to decorate the central part of the facades; the walls are encircled by 24 columns from all sides. The structure consists of 6 open balconies. There are staircases and an elevator to reach the top where a museum, an observation deck and a resting place are located. Heydar Aliyev Center - built between 2012 and 2014 is located at the end of the main alley; the four-story building on an area of 2263 m2 is encircled with octagonal columns along the center perimeter. The height of this structure is 24.3 m. The flag of Azerbaijan is installed on the glass ceiling of the Center. There is a memorial museum, a library, a reading hall, different conference rooms, dance, carpet-weaving training centers in the building. In front of the Center, a statue to Heydar Aliyev has been placed.

The Amphitheater - considered for organizing large open-air events for up to 5000 people. The pillars on the edges of the structure have been decorated with national ornaments. Ganja Youth Center – The building was inaugurated in May 2016 with the aim of organizing different events and involving young people in various career, personal development and art activities; the building occupying 975 sq.m. has 3 storeys. Ganjland, the children's amusement park is the entertainment component of the Park operating since 2015. Tourist attractions in Ganja Culture of Azerbaijan

Graham Campbell

Graham Campbell was an Australian rules footballer who played 151 games for the Fitzroy Football Club in the Victorian Football League from 1956 until 1964. In his playing days Campbell was both a rover and half-forward, at his peak in 1957 when he won Fitzroy's Best & Fairest award, the Mitchell Medal, he was a handy and consistent goal-kicker for the Lions, kicking at least 18 goals in all but his first and last season. Although the club had limited success in this era he did play in a Preliminary Final with the club in 1960 and in their Night Premiership side in 1959. Campbell turned to coaching and after a stint with the reserves he got his first taste of the big time when he was Fitzroy's caretaker coach following Graham Donaldson's resignation in 1974; the next year he coached them to the 1975 WAFL premiership. He was coach of West Perth until 1977 before returning to Fitzroy where was appointed their senior coach, it started well for Campbell as he steered the Lions to another Night Premiership but the 1978 season would be his only year in charge as the Lions finished out of the finals in ninth position.

When Percy Johnson was fired as West Perth coach during the middle of the 1979 season Campbell was brought back and he stayed until the end of the 1981 season. However, he had no further success at West Perth with the club failing to make the final four in any of the years from 1979-81. Ross Gibbs debuted for West Perth in 1979 and he played under Campbell again at Glenelg. From 1983 to 1984 he was coach of Glenelg Football Club in the South Australian National Football League. Campbell's career in Adelaide got off to a bad start as Glenelg lost their first eight games of the 1983 season, he was sacked by the club at one point during this run, but was re-appointed the following day. After losing their first eight games, the Tigers started to return to the form which had seen them play in the previous two Grand Finals as they made a bid for the finals, their run was halted with a 74-point loss to eventual premiers West Adelaide in Round 21. Campbell continued as Glenelg coach in 1984 with the team improving to finish a strong 3rd, but he wasn't retained at the end of the year, bringing the curtain down on a 28-year career in league football.

He was replaced as coach by former Glenelg champion player Graham Cornes. A natural speaker with the "gift of the gab", Campbell stayed in Adelaide and put his vast football knowledge to good use, spending the next few years as an analyst for various Adelaide based television stations covering the SANFL. Graham Campbell's playing statistics from AFL Tables Graham Campbell at AustralianFootball.com

List of piano concertos by key

This list of piano concertos by key is a list of famous piano concertos sorted by key. For the least used keys in orchestral music, the piano concerto listed might be famous only for being in that key. Technically, the piano can play in any key, the unaccompanied solo piano repertoire abounds in keys that are used less in orchestral music. So, some preferences manifest themselves. Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto No. 6 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 8 Piano Concerto No. 13 Piano Concerto No. 21 Piano Concerto No. 25 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 6, Op. 123 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto for the Left Hand, Op.17 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 11 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto No. 16 Piano Concerto No. 26 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 9 Piano Concerto No. 10 Piano Concerto No. 14 Piano Concerto No. 22 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto No. 2 "Romantisches" Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto for Orchestra "Satori-Bodhi" ] Piano Concerto No.

2, Op. 59 Concerto in F Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 7 Piano Concerto No. 11 Piano Concerto No. 19 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto Scottish Concerto Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto No. 17 Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Concert Fantasia, op. 56 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 5 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 8, Op. 151 "Gruss an den Rhein" Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 12 Piano Concerto No. 23 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No.1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 6 Piano Concerto No. 15 Piano Concerto No. 18 Piano Concerto No. 27 Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 7 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 24 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto for the left hand, Op. 17 Piano Concerto No.

3, Op. 55 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 3 Totentanz, S. 126 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No.1 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 20 Piano Concerto in D minor Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Fantasy on Hungarian folk tunes, S. 123 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 3 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No.1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 4 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 1 Piano Concerto Piano Concerto No

Neel Madhav

Neel Madhav is an Indian TV personality, mentalist, illusionist and TEDx speaker. He has his own travel and magic show on NDTV Good Times television, called You Got Magic with Neel Madhav, he has been featured on Forbes Asia 30 under 30 list for his contributions to sports and entertainment in 2019. His tricks include a combination of magic with mentalism, neuro-linguistic programming, criminology. Neel was born in lives in Bandra, Mumbai, he is part Kashmiri and Hindkowan from his maternal side and of Bengali and Hindavi heritage from his paternal side. He has an elder brother Suryavir Madhav, his family shuffled between Malaysia and New Delhi over the years until he went to the prestigious The Doon School spending the next 5 years of his life. Neel studied at H. R. College, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Commerce degree. While in college he undertook five internships, which were an integral part of his studies, he interned at MTV in London, Red FM, Sphere Origins and at a social media agency to get an overall understanding of how a production house works.

Neel counts magicians James Jason Randell as his inspirations. In 2013, Neel started. Neel teaches criminal psychology and neuro-linguistic programming; the third season aired on 26 September 2016. Madhav performs street magic on his TV show, similar to Steven Frayne's TV show Dynamo: Magician Impossible and Simply Magic by Cyril Takayama, his most famous work on the TV show was to turn sand into gold, turn leaves into butterfly, make a bucket full on pulses appear from his bare hands, making people forget how to read, predicting the headlines of a newspaper on Red FM 93.5. He has spoken at two TEDx conferences, one in Mumbai on criminal psychology and neuro-linguistic programming and the other in Bangalore on creativity and innovation. In 2016 Neel published the book You Got Magic, he has signed a two-book contract with Penguin Random House. Neel performs all over the world for celebrities and royalty, his corporate clients include Oracle, Google, Vedanta Group

Egea inermis

Egea inermis is a species of glass squid in the monotypic genus Egea. The mantle of Egea inermis is shaped like a spindle, is three times the length of the long and thin fins, is made up of thin walls. Furthermore, the funnel is quite large and the species includes both a funnel organ and a developed valve; the head in contrast includes two big eyes protruding toward the anterior. Both the head and the mantle are connected by a short neck. Moreover, the arms are short yet strong and include two rows of large suckers. Overall, the best indications that an organism of this species is maturing into an adult are the fins increasing in length, the head and mantle experiencing changes, the sexual organs developing. Egea inermis is bioluminescent. Egea inermis is found in both the tropical Atlantic waters; this species are found close to land, are scattered throughout the open water in the oceans, follow warm water currents. "CephBase: Egea inermis". Archived from the original on 2005. Tree of Life web project: Egea inermis Voss, Nancy A..

"Biological Results of the University of Miami Deep-Sea Expeditions Part 109 Studies on the Cephalopod Family Cranchiidae A Redescription of Egea-Inermis". Bulletin of Marine Science. 24: 939–956. Passarella, Kenneth C.. "Species Composition and Food Habits of the Micronektonic Cephalopod Assemblage in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico". Bulletin of Marine Science. 49: 638–659