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Bitter Springs, Arizona

Bitter Springs is a native village and census-designated place on the Navajo Nation in Coconino County, Arizona, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 452. Bitter Springs is located at 36°37′15″N 111°39′23″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.0 square miles, all of it land. The mean elevation is 5,115 feet above sea level; the US Postal Service ZIP code is 86040. Bitter Springs is the terminus of U. S. Route 89A, a spur route cut off by the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam. Bitter Springs first appeared on the 2000 U. S. Census as a census-designated place; as of the census of 2000, there were 547 people, 104 households, 97 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 66.1 people per square mile. There were 127 housing units at an average density of 15.3/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.72% Native American and 1.28% White, with 0.73% of the population made up of Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 104 households out of which 73.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.7% were married couples living together, 26.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.8% were non-families.

4.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 5.26 and the average family size was 5.34. In the CDP, the age distribution of the population shows 48.3% under the age of 18, 14.3% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 10.6% from 45 to 64, 2.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 19 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.3 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $24,886, the median income for a family was $30,217. Males had a median income of $11,477 versus $14,038 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $7,985. About 25.0% of families and 29.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.2% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over. Bitter Springs is served by the Page Unified School District; the schools that serve Bitter Springs are located in the city of Page

Russian yacht Livadia (1873)

Livadia was an imperial yacht of the House of Romanov built in 1869–1873 by Leopold Schwede in Nikolaev. She served on the Black Sea; the Livadia was the only Russian imperial yacht that has seen active combat service during the Russo-Turkish war of 1877–1878. October 21–22, 1878 she ran aground near Cape Tarkhan-Kut in Crimea and sank. In 1860 General Admiral of Russian Imperial Navy Grand Duke Constantin converted Tigr, a three-masted paddle steamer built in 1855–1858, into a yacht for the Romanovs; the 62 meter long Tigr did not have the space and comforts expected by her distinguished patrons, in 1868 the government discussed ordering her replacement in England. This proposal was discarded, the job was awarded to captain Leopold Schwede of Nikolaev Admiralty. Work began in the end of 1869, although the Livadia was laid down only in March 1870. Livadia, which displaced 1,965 tons, was smaller than her Baltic Sea counterpart Derzhava but matched her in size and comfort of the imperial suites designed by Ippolit Monighetti.

Livadia spent the summer of 1873 on the Black Sea, tending to the Romanovs on their short route from Sebastopol to Yalta. In March 1874 it left for a long training voyage of the Mediterranean and survived a force 11 storm. After the outbreak of the Russian-Turkish War of 1877-1878 it was converted into an armed auxiliary cruiser. On August 21, 1877 Livadia sank a Turkish schooner but was spotted by two Turkish ironclads and survived an 18-hour pursuit. In the evening of October 21, 1878 Livadia left Sebastopol for Odessa; some unknown urgency forced the captain to sail into the night in inclement weather. None of the Romanovs was on board. In the foggy morning of October 22, 1878 Livadia ran aground near the lighthouse of Cape Tarkhan-Kut, the western vortex of the Crimean peninsula; the crew safely salvaged most of the royal furnishings. Salvage of the ship itself failed, 47 days after the accident the hull of Livadia was destroyed by waves. In 1880 the name Livadia was given to an experimental yacht built for the Romanovs in Scotland.

Remains of Livadia are still visible in the shallow waters near the cape. For decades divers knew them as "that little steamer". Divers from Tula examined the wreck and reported that the wooden hull had disintegrated. Remains of the deck and copper lining were still identifiable. Russian yacht Livadia Larionov, A. L.. Из истории императорских яхт Is istorii imperatorskikh yacht. Gangut magazine, no. 22, 2001. Taylor, Joan du Plat. Marine archaeology: developments during sixty years in the Mediterranean. World Confederation of Underwater Activities, Hutchinson. - contains an account of locating the wreck of Livadia in 1960s. Larionov, A. L.. Russkie imperatorskie yachty. EGO. ISBN 5-8276-0016-4

Carabus cancellatus

Carabus cancellatus is a ground beetle common in Central- and Northern Europe and Siberia. It has been introduced into North America, its length is 17–32 millimetres. It has nine subspecies: Carabus cancellatus alessiensis Apfelbeck 1901 Carabus cancellatus cancellatus Illiger, 1798 Carabus cancellatus carinatus Charpentier, 1825 Carabus cancellatus corpulentus Kraatz, 1880 Carabus cancellatus emarginatus Duftschmid, 1812 Carabus cancellatus excisus Dejean, 1826 Carabus cancellatus graniger Palliardi, 1825 Carabus cancellatus tibiscinus Csiki, 1906 Carabus cancellatus tuberculatus Dejean, 1826 Picture gallery Carabus cancellatus on You Tube

Wilhelm Gisbert Groos

Wilhelm Gisbert Groos was a German World War I flying ace credited with seven aerial victories. Wilhelm Gisbert Groos was born on 10 August, 1894 to Dr. Ernst Gisbert Karl Julius Georg Groos and Laura Maria Colsman, he was admitted to the Prussian Cadet Corps and served in an Uhlan Regiment. While an Ensign before the First World War, he had been training to compete in the 3000 meter race at the 1916 Summer Olympics. Groos received his pilot's license from the Halberstadt Civil Flying School, he joined Jasta 4 in May, 1917. On May 17, he scored his first victory while flying over Droucourt, France against a British Sopwith triplane. Shortly afterwards, he was transferred to Jasta 11 on May 24, he is credited with achieving five further victories between 23 August. After Wilhelm Reinhard was wounded, Groos was given command of Jasta 11 between 6 and 11 September, he relinquished command. Groos was wounded on 14 September and Wolff was killed the following day. After Wolff's death, Groos reassumed command again between 15 and 25 September until Lothar von Richthofen was given the position.

After Groos recovered he was appointed a position within Jastaschule II in Nivelles. However, he returned to Jasta 11 on 10 July, 1918 for a short time when there became a shortage of pilots. On 1 August, 1918, he scored his last victory against a British SPAD aircraft. Shortly afterwards, he returned to Jastaschule II on 16 September and remained there for the rest of the war. Gross retired from the Luftstreitkräfte after the war, he had two sons, Manfred Wilhelm and Ernst Gisbert. He became the director of the Westdeutschen Steinzeug-Werke company in Euskirchen. In 1994, Groos celebrated his 100th birthday, he died in 1997 near Cologne/Bonn, around 103 years old. At the time of his death he was the last surviving member of Jasta 11

Israel–Zimbabwe relations

Israel–Zimbabwe relations refers to foreign relations between Israel and Zimbabwe. Neither country has a resident ambassador. Israel did not support Rhodesia's 1965 declaration of independence from Great Britain. In the same year, it called the new Rhodesian regime illegal. However, by the 1970s Israel's attitude toward Rhodesia changed. Rhodesia was under international sanctions due to its Timocratic nature. Israel, like others, did not participate in the sanctions. During the 1970s, Israel sold weapons and military equipment to the predominantly white government of Rhodesia during the Rhodesian Bush War granting them a license to manufacture their own. Rhodesia became Zimbabwe Rhodesia in 1979 Zimbabwe in 1980; the new Zimbabwean government under Robert Mugabe supported the PLO under Yasser Arafat during the 1980s, formally established relations with the PLO in March 1983. Israeli relations with South Africa in the 1970s led to Zimbabwe's verbal support for the PLO and comparisons of Zionism to apartheid.

The state-run publication, The Herald, questioned the legitimacy of Israel's existence. In October 1983, Abel Muzorewa, the former Prime Minister of Zimbabwe Rhodesia, visited Israel, he urged Robert Mugabe to establish diplomatic relations, saying his political policies hurt Zimbabwe's agriculture and technology industries. Muzorewa was imprisoned that year for alleged conspiracy with South Africa. Israel and Zimbabwe established formal diplomatic relations in 1993. In 2001, the Zimbabwean government voiced support for a two-state solution to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. Zimbabwe is not a party to boycotts on Israel. In March 2002 an Israeli company sold riot control vehicles to the Mugabe government. In 2008, a Zimbabwean business delegation visited Israel for a week to explore new trade opportunities in the spheres of agriculture, telecommunications and solar energy; the tour was organized by the Christian Friends of Israel Zimbabwe. At a meeting in Tel Aviv in June 2010, Israel declared its support for Zimbabwe's inclusion in the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, stating that Zimbabwe is capable of supplying nearly a quarter of the global demand for diamonds.

In 2015, Israel's exports to Zimbabwe totaled US $7.14 million, while Zimbabwe exported exclusively diamonds to Israel for US $13.8 million in the same year. Jews of Zimbabwe International recognition of Israel

Redford, Texas

Redford is a census-designated place in Presidio County, United States. The population was 90 at the 2010 census. Redford is located at 29°26′55″N 104°11′15″W. According to the United States Census Bureau in 2000, the CDP has a total area of 45.1 square miles, of which 45.0 square miles are land and 0.02% is water. The CDP lost area prior to the 2010 census; this area has a large amount of sunshine year round due to its stable descending air and high pressure. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Redford has a desert climate, abbreviated "Bwh" on climate maps; as of the census of 2000, there were 132 people, 48 households, 36 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2.9 people per square mile. There were 74 housing units at an average density of 1.6/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 87.88% White, 0.76% Native American, 0.76% Asian, 10.61% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 87.88% of the population. There were 48 households, of which 39.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.4% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 25.0% were non-families.

18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.7% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.25. In the CDP, the age distribution of the population shows 31.8% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 15.9% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, 24.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.7 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $15,417, the median income for a family was $15,903. Males had a median income of $16,250 versus $7,031 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $3,577. There were 65.7% of families and 83.8% of the population living below the poverty line, including 100.0% of those under 18 and 37.0% of those over 64. Redford is served by the Marfa Independent School District