Boyd Dawkins

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M. Boyd Dawkins
Member of the South Australian Legislative Council
In office
March 1962 – November 1982
Personal details
Born Maynard Boyd Dawkins
(1917-01-02)2 January 1917
Stirling, South Australia
Died 21 October 1996(1996-10-21) (aged 79)
Adelaide, South Australia
Resting place Gawler River, South Australia
Nationality Australian
Political party Liberal and Country League
Spouse(s)
Constance Lilian Wilkinson (m. 1943)
Relations Nephew: John Dawkins
Children John Dawkins
Occupation farmer and politician

Maynard Boyd Dawkins (2 January 1917 – 21 October 1996)[1] generally known as "M. B. Dawkins" or "Boyd Dawkins", was a sheep breeder, choirmaster and politician in the State of South Australia.

History[edit]

Dawkins was born in Stirling West the only son of Albert Maynard Dawkins of Gawler River and his wife Mary (née Yeoman).[2] The Dawkins family were early settlers of Gawler, and well known in the area.[3]

He studied at Roseworthy Agricultural College, where his father was a board member,[4] He was, like fellow parliamentarian Leslie Rupert Hart, a breeder of Dorset Horn sheep.

He was president of the Gawler Men's Branch of the Liberal and Country League,[5] and was a successful Liberal candidate for a Midland seat on the Legislative Council in March 1962, successfully made the transition to the new Legislative Council in July 1975 when, by the Act of 1973, the State reverted to voting as one electorate, with proportional representation. He retired in November 1982.

Other interests[edit]

Dawkins was a teetotaller; an active member of the Methodist Church and the Band of Hope; following a long family tradition.[6]

He was a fine bass-baritone, a member of the Adelaide Philharmonic Choir, who studied under Clifford Lathlean,[7] and conductor of the notable Gawler Choral Society.[8]

Personal[edit]

He married Constance Lilian Wilkinson on 24 August 1943.[9] A son, John Dawkins, born 3 July 1954,[10] followed his father as a member of the Legislative Council in 1997, and remains a member to the present day (2014).

A nephew also called John was a politician from the Australian Labor Party and was Federal Treasurer in 1991 to 1993.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former Members of the Parliament of South Australia". Retrieved 18 December 2014.
  2. ^ "Family Notices". South Australian Register. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 26 October 1900. p. 4. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  3. ^ "Cricket". Bunyip. Gawler, SA: National Library of Australia. 5 January 1934. p. 6. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  4. ^ "Roseworthy College Scholarships". Bunyip. Gawler, SA: National Library of Australia. 10 March 1933. p. 4. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  5. ^ "Local Men's L.C.L Branch Revived". Bunyip. Gawler, SA: National Library of Australia. 5 June 1953. p. 7. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  6. ^ "Out Among the People". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 5 May 1944. p. 6. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  7. ^ "Musical Notes". The Mail. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 16 December 1939. p. 2 Supplement: Magazine. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  8. ^ "Choral Society presents "The Crucifixion"". Bunyip. Gawler, SA: National Library of Australia. 30 March 1951. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  9. ^ "Family Notices". Murray Pioneer. Renmark, SA: National Library of Australia. 7 October 1943. p. 9. Retrieved 19 December 2014.
  10. ^ "Family Notices". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 6 July 1954. p. 20. Retrieved 19 December 2014.