Brucella abortus

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Brucella abortus
Scientific classification
Domain: Bacteria
Phylum: Proteobacteria
Class: Alphaproteobacteria
Order: Rhizobiales
Family: Brucellaceae
Genus: Brucella
Species: B. abortus
Binomial name
Brucella abortus
(Schmidt, 1901) Meyer and Shaw, 1920

Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative proteobacterium in the family Brucellaceae, and is one of the causative agents of brucellosis. The rod-shaped pathogen is classified under the domain Bacteria.[1] The prokaryotic B. abortus, is spore-forming, nonmotile and aerobic.[2]

Brucella abortus enters phagocytes that invade human and animal defenses which in turn, cause chronic disease in the host. The liver and spleen are the affected areas of the body.[3] Farm workers and veterinarians are the highest risk individuals for acquiring the disease. Swine, goats, sheep, and cattle are a few of the reservoirs for the disease.[4] B. abortus causes abortion and infertility in adult cattle, and is a zoonosis which is present worldwide.[5] Humans are commonly infected after drinking unpasteurized milk from affected animals.[6]

The incubation period for the disease can range from 2 weeks to 1 year. Once symptoms begin to show, the host will be sick anywhere from 5 days to 5 months, depending on severity of illness. A few of the symptoms of brucellosis include: fever, chills, headache, backache, and weight loss. As with any disease, there can be serious complications; endocarditis and liver abscess are a couple of complications for brucellosis.[7]

B. abortus also affects bison.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Institutes of Health (NIH)". National Institutes of Health (NIH). Retrieved 2017-10-25. 
  2. ^ "CDC Works 24/7". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2017-10-24. Retrieved 2017-10-25. 
  3. ^ "CDC Works 24/7". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2017-10-24. Retrieved 2017-10-25. 
  4. ^ "CDC Works 24/7". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2017-10-24. Retrieved 2017-10-25. 
  5. ^ Dorneles, EM; Sriranganathan, N; Lage, AP (8 July 2015). "Recent advances in Brucella abortus vaccines". Veterinary research. 46: 76. doi:10.1186/s13567-015-0199-7. PMC 4495609Freely accessible. PMID 26155935. 
  6. ^ Scott, PR; Penny, CD; Macrae, A, eds. (2011). "Brucellosis". Cattle Medicine. London: Manson Pub. p. 34. ISBN 978-1840766110. 
  7. ^ "microbewiki". microbewiki.kenyon.edu. Retrieved 2017-10-25. 
  8. ^ Lott, Dale F. (2002). American bison: a natural history. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 109. ISBN 978-0520233386. 

External links[edit]