Byers Lake (Alaska)

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Byers Lake
Denalibeyersflatcalm.JPG
View from the shore opposite the boat launch, with Denali and the Alaska Range reflected in the lake. Only human powered boats and electric motors are permitted at Byers Lake
LocationDenali State Park, Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska
Coordinates62°44′23″N 150°06′40″W / 62.73972°N 150.11111°W / 62.73972; -150.11111Coordinates: 62°44′23″N 150°06′40″W / 62.73972°N 150.11111°W / 62.73972; -150.11111
Primary inflowsByers Creek
Primary outflowsByers Creek
Basin countriesUnited States
Max. length1.23 miles (1.98 km)
Max. width0.6 miles (0.97 km)
Surface area325 acres (132 ha)
Max. depth160 feet (49 m)
Shore length14 miles (6.4 km)
Surface elevation816 feet (249 m)
Frozenlate October-late May/early June
Islandsnone
1 Shore length is not a well-defined measure.

Byers Lake is a small lake in Denali State Park, within the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States, 28 miles (45 km) north of Talkeetna. The lake is named for a fisherman who was brought there many times by bush pilot Don Sheldon in the 1950s,[1] it is accessible from the George Parks Highway and has a developed campground, several public-use cabins and a small boat dock. The Alaska Veterans Memorial is on a hilltop adjacent to the lake.[2] Gasoline-powered motors and floatplane landings are not permitted on the lake; the lake used to contain a sizable population of lake trout but due to overfishing in the time since the highway was built in 1972 the population has dwindled, and landings of lake trout are now rare, although there are still burbot in the lake as well. Migrating salmon also come into the lake but salmon fishing is not permitted. Campers are advised to keep a clean camp as the campground is frequently visited by bears; the lake is also home in summer months to trumpeter swans and common loons.[3]

The Cascade Trail to Kesugi Ridge climbs above Byers Lake, with the Alaska Range and Denali in the background.

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Byers Lake (Alaska)
  2. ^ The Milepost (61st ed.). p. 406. ISBN 978-1892-15426-2.
  3. ^ Stop and Smell the Fireweed Tammy Bruce, Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman, 7/16/2002

External links[edit]

Media related to Byers Lake (Alaska) at Wikimedia Commons