Carbajal Valley

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Carbajal Valley
ARG-2016-Aerial-Tierra del Fuego (Ushuaia)–Valle Carbajal 01.jpg
Aerial view, east end
Carbajal Valley is located in Southern Patagonia
Carbajal Valley
Carbajal Valley
Floor elevation ~150 metres (490 ft) asl
Long-axis direction NW-SE
Long-axis length ~20 kilometres (12.4 mi)
Width 2.6 kilometres (1.6 mi)
Geography
Coordinates 54°41′8.69″S 68°20′57.67″W / 54.6857472°S 68.3493528°W / -54.6857472; -68.3493528Coordinates: 54°41′8.69″S 68°20′57.67″W / 54.6857472°S 68.3493528°W / -54.6857472; -68.3493528
Watercourses Río Olivia

The Carbajal Valley (Spanish: Valle Carbajal) is located in the Fuegian Andes of southern Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina. The Carbajal valley is approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) long, running west (54°39′37.85″S 68°30′21.83″W / 54.6605139°S 68.5060639°W / -54.6605139; -68.5060639) to east (54°39′39.24″S 68°30′23.79″W / 54.6609000°S 68.5066083°W / -54.6609000; -68.5066083), between the Alvear mountain range to the north and the Vinciguerra range to the south.[1][2][3] Andes peak heights in the region are generally less than 1,250 metres (4,100 ft) above sea level.[1]

Argentine Route 3 runs diagonally through Ushuaia (SW-NE) along the Río Olivia past the west base of Mount Olivia and around the northwestern and northern base of Monte Cinco Hermanos.

Topography[edit]

During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), approximately 20 ka BP or 20,000 years ago,[4][nb 1] a Valley glacier carved the Carbajal-Tierra Mayor valley (described as the "glaciation axis of the Fuegian Andes")[7] from northwest to southeast, with an ice tongue forking south along the Valle Río Olivia into the Beagle Channel immediately to the east of Ushuaia.[8] Based on the geological study of the erosion patterns, the Carbajal glacier’s ice thickness was 600–800 metres (2,000–2,600 ft).[8] Several existing glaciers (e.g., Ojos de Albino, Vinciguerra) were tributaries of the Carbajal glacier.[9]

In the early Holocene period (11.7–8.2 ka BP/11,700–8,200 years ago),[10] by 10.3 ka BP (10,300 years ago), ice had receded from the valley walls and vegetation was growing.[8] By the middle Holocene period (8.2–4.2 ka BP/8,200–4,200 years ago),[11] forest growth was expanding.[8]

Currently, the nearly U-shaped valley floor (pictured) is covered with "Sphagnum peat bogs and poorly drained mires."[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Menounos et al. 2013, p. 71.
  2. ^ Rabassa et al. 2006, p. 130.
  3. ^ Hennessy 1999, p. 333.
  4. ^ a b Borromei et al. 2007, p. 332.
  5. ^ Hopcroft & Valdes 2015, p. 5533.
  6. ^ Cook & Vizy 2006, p. 1.
  7. ^ Rabassa 2008, p. 183.
  8. ^ a b c d Borromei et al. 2007, p. 329.
  9. ^ Menounos et al. 2013, pp. 73–75.
  10. ^ Walker et al. 2012, p. 651.
  11. ^ Walker et al. 2012, p. 653.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Research suggests that the LGM occurred 19–23 ka BP.[5][6]

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]