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Centenario

The Centenario is a Mexican gold bullion coin first minted in 1921 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Mexico's independence from Spain. The coin is not intended to be used as currency; the obverse of the Centenario contains the image of Winged Victory, with a laurel wreath in her right hand and broken chains in her left. Two famous Mexican volcanoes and Iztaccíhuatl, rise in the background; the 1821 on the lower left commemorates the year of Mexico's independence. The date on the right indicates year of mintage, with the 1921 and 1931 mintages being valuable. Production restarted in 1943 due to the demand for gold coins, coins minted between 1949 and 1972 are marked "1947"; this coin was designed by Emilio del Moral. The reverse depicts the coat of arms of Mexico, which shows the Golden eagle perched on a cactus with a serpent in its beak; the Centenario weighs 41.67 grams and contains 37.5 grams of gold in an alloy of 90% gold and 10% copper, is 37 mm in diameter. The 1943 mintage is somewhat special because of the double "37.5 Gr Oro Puro" markings, leaving out the "50 pesos" legend, has the same diameter: 37 mm.

The original Centenario design was used in the Libertad Series of gold and silver bullion coins. *With date of 1947 Centenario Family - Banco de México

Helena Bridge

The Helena Bridge is a cantilever bridge carrying U. S. Route 49 across the Mississippi River between Helena and Lula, Mississippi; the main cantilever span was modeled on the similar Benjamin G. Humphreys Bridge, built downstream by Arkansas and Mississippi two decades earlier. However, the river navigation issues that led to the replacement of the Humphreys Bridge with the Greenville Bridge do not apply to the Helena Bridge, as the river curve here is far less severe than the one just upstream from the Humphreys and Greenville Bridges; the bridge had a stated construction cost of $14 million, was opened as a toll bridge in 1961, replacing the previous ferry. The total length of the bridge is less than a mile; the bridge superstructure suffered its first substantial damage from a barge accident in July 1997. List of crossings of the Lower Mississippi River

Leal, North Dakota

Leal is a city in Barnes County in the States of North Dakota. The population was 20 at the 2010 census. Leal was founded in 1892; the name comes from the Scots word for "faithful," which in the phrase laund o the leal means Heaven. Scottish-English emigrants from Ontario, Canada settled in this area in 1883; the townsite of Leal was platted in 1892, a post office established December 28, 1892. Officials with the Soo Line Railroad established a station here in 1902. Leal incorporated as a village in 1917 from part of Edna Township, it became a city in 1967, after the North Dakota Legislature eliminated incorporation titles for villages and towns. As a result, all incorporated municipalities in North Dakota automatically adopted a city form of government. Leal is located in Edna Township in the northeastern part of Barnes County, it is 73 miles west of Fargo, the nearest city is Rogers. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.14 square miles, all of it land. Due to its location in the Great Plains and distance from both mountains and oceans, the city has an extreme continental climate, USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 4.

The lowest temperature recorded was −37 °F on December 23, 1983, the highest temperature recorded was 106 °F on July 30, 2006. As of the census of 2010, there were 20 people, 10 households, 6 families residing in the city; the population density was 142.9 inhabitants per square mile. There were 11 housing units at an average density of 78.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 5.0 % from two or more races. There were 10 households of which 10.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.0% were married couples living together, 20.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 40.0% were non-families. 40.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.00 and the average family size was 2.50. The median age in the city was 53 years. 15% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 65.0 % female. As of the 2000 census, there were 36 people, 12 households, 11 families residing in the city.

The population density was 272.4 inhabitants per square mile. There were 12 housing units at an average density of 90.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 100.00% White. The top 4 ancestry groups in the city are Norwegian, German and French. 21 residents reported having multiple ancestries, meaning these percentages add up to more than 100% of the population. There were 12 households out of which 58.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 25.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 8.3% were non-families. 8.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.18. In the city, the population was spread out with 38.9% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, 8.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 63.6 males.

For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.3 males. The median income for a household in the city was $28,750, the median income for a family was $31,875. Males had a median income of $27,188 versus $0 for females; the per capita income for the city was $10,662. About 13.3% of families and 9.1% of the population living below the poverty line, including 13.0% of those under 18 and none of those aged 65 and over. Map of Leal, North Dakota. U. S. Census Bureau