Cerebral Palsy Games

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cerebral Palsy Games
Abbreviation CP Games
First event 1974
Website http://www.cpsport.org/news/cpisra-world-games/

The Cerebral Palsy Games (or CP Games) are a multi-sport competition for athletes with a disability, which under the former name of the International Stoke Mandeville Games were the forerunner of the Paralympic Games. The competition has been formerly known as the International Cerebral Palsy Games or the Stoke Mandeville Games. Since the 1990s the Games are organized by the organisation Cerebral Palsy International Sports and Recreation Association (CPISRA), so they called also CPISRA World Games.

The Games were originally held in 1976 by neurologist Sir Ludwig Guttmann, who organized a sporting competition involving World War II veterans with spinal cord injuries at the Stoke Mandeville Hospital rehabilitation facility in Aylesbury, England, taking place concurrently with the first post-war Summer Olympics in London. In 1952, the Netherlands joined in the event, creating the first international sports competition for the disabled; in 1960, the Ninth Stoke Mandeville Games were held in Rome, Italy, following that year's Olympic Games. These are considered to be the first Paralympic Games,[1][2] the 2012 Paralympic mascot Mandeville was named after Stoke Mandeville Hospital.[3]

While the Paralympic Games evolved to include athletes from all disability groups, the Stoke Mandeville games continued to be organized as a multi-sport event for wheelchair athletes. Games were held annually in Aylesbury under the direction of the International Stoke Mandeville Games Federation (ISMGF), which became the International Stoke Mandeville Wheelchair Sports Federation (ISMWSF).

Games[edit]

No. Year Games Host City Opening Ceremony Closing Ceremony Ref.
I 1974 1. International Cerebral Palsy Games England London [1]
II 1976 2. International Cerebral Palsy Games France Montrodat
III 1978 3. International Cerebral Palsy Games Scotland Edinburgh July 1978 [4][5]
IV 1980 4. International Cerebral Palsy Games [4]
V 1982 5. International Cerebral Palsy Games Denmark Greve [4]
VI 1986 6. International Cerebral Palsy Games Belgium Gits
VII 1989 Robin Hood CP World Games England Nottingham [4]
VIII 1993 Robin Hood CP World Games England Nottingham [4][6]
IX 1997 Robin Hood CP World Games Netherlands Delden 8 May 12 May [4][7]
X 2001 CPISRA World Games
Robin Hood CP World Games
England Nottingham 19 July 29 July [4][8][9][10][11]
XI 2005 CPISRA World Games United States New London 27 June 11 July [4][12][13][14]
XII 2015 CPISRA World Games England Nottingham 6 August 16 August [15]
XIII 2018 CPISRA World Games Spain Sant Cugat del Vallès [16]
XIV 2021 CPISRA World Games

2015 Medal table[edit]

  *   Host nation (England)

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 England England* 85 52 19 156
2 Scotland Scotland 29 13 11 53
3 Australia Australia 22 7 3 32
4 Republic of Ireland Ireland 18 3 4 25
5 Austria Austria 11 17 6 34
6 Denmark Denmark 10 2 0 12
7 Sweden Schweden 6 7 4 17
8 Portugal Portugal 3 6 3 12
9 Hungary Hungary 3 1 0 4
10 Russia Russia 1 0 0 1
11 Brazil Brazil 0 2 1 3
12 Japan Japan 0 0 0 0
Netherlands Netherlands 0 0 0 0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "An Overview: 1969-1978". cpisra.org. 2016-09-11. Archived from the original on 2016-03-25. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  2. ^ Randi Druzin (September 5, 2008). "Paralympics traces roots to Second World War". CBC Sports. 
  3. ^ BBC Wenlock and Mandeville
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "CPISRA 30th Anniversary 1978-2018" (PDF). cpisra.org.za. 2016-09-11. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  5. ^ "History". ifcpf.com. 2016-09-11. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  6. ^ "Cerebral Palsy Sport". cpsport.org. 2016-09-11. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  7. ^ "CP voetball, Interlands, Overzicht". cpvoetbal.nl (in Dutch). 2016-09-11. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  8. ^ "CPISRA World Games is huge Success in Nottingham!". britishtaekwondo.org.uk. 2016-09-11. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  9. ^ "CP-ISRA MEETING SCHEDULES 2000". cpisra.org. 2001-03-07. Archived from the original on 2000-03-02. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  10. ^ "CP SPORT CALENDAR OF FORTHCOMING EVENTS (last updated 7/2/2001)". cpsport.org. 2001-03-06. Archived from the original on 2001-03-06. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  11. ^ "CP-ISRA World Games 2001". cpisra.org. 2001-12-17. Archived from the original on 2001-12-17. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  12. ^ "2005 CP-ISRA World Championships for Athletes with a Disability". olympic.cn. 2005-07-04. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  13. ^ "2005 CP-ISRA World Championships". nationalsportsfestival.org. 2006-12-18. Archived from the original on 2005-12-18. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  14. ^ "2005 CP-ISRA World Championships". ndsaonline.org. 2005-03-03. Archived from the original on 2005-07-17. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  15. ^ "CP-ISRA World Games 2015". cpsport.org. 2016-05-03. Archived from the original on 2016-05-03. Retrieved 2016-09-19. 
  16. ^ "CPISRA's premier international multi-sports event for elite and talented athletes". cpisra.org. Retrieved 2016-09-11. 

External links[edit]