Christian Social People's Service

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Christian Social People's Service

Christlich-Sozialer Volksdienst
FoundedDecember 1929
Dissolved1933
Split fromGerman National People's Party
IdeologyConservatism
Political Protestantism
Christian democracy
Populism
Agrarianism
Political positionRight-wing
ColorsGrey
1932 election poster

The Christian Social People's Service (German: Christlich-Sozialer Volksdienst) was a Protestant conservative political party in the Weimar Republic.

The CSVD was founded in December 1929 through the merger of two Protestant political formations: the Christlich-soziale Reichsvereinigung (Christian Social Reich Association) and the Christlicher Volksdienst (Christian People's Service). Both had emerged from dissatisfaction amongst Protestants towards the developments within the German National People's Party (DNVP); the two groups differed on many issues, such as the role of the Republic, but were able to keep organizational unity. The CSVD portrayed itself as a Protestant version of the Catholic Centre and was mainly supported by middle-class elements. In the main they were considered to be part of the moderate tendency within the DNVP, as opposed to the radical nationalist leadership of Alfred Hugenberg.[1]

The CSVD contested the 1930 and 1932 parliamentary elections; the party CSVD formed a joint parliamentary group with the Christlich-Nationale Bauern- und Landvolkpartei (Christian National Peasants' and Rural Peoples Party) in the Reichstag. After the Nazi take-over in 1933, the CSVD was dissolved.

The President of the Federal Republic of Germany Gustav Heinemann (1969–74) was a member of CSVD during the Weimar Republic.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Bessel & E.J. Feuchtwanger, Social Change and Political Development in Weimar Germany, Croom Helm, 1981, ISBN 085664921X, p. 277