Christoph Dabrowski

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Christoph Dabrowski
Personal information
Full name Christoph Dabrowski
Birth name Krzysztof Dąbrowski
Date of birth (1978-08-01) 1 August 1978 (age 40)
Place of birth Katowice, Poland
Height 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in)
Playing position Defensive midfielder
Club information
Current team
Hannover 96 (assistant)
Youth career
1988–1993 1. FC Schöneberg
1993–1994 BFC Preußen Berlin
1994–1995 Hertha BSC
1995–1996 SV Werder Bremen
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1996–2001 SV Werder Bremen II 51 (2)
1998–2001 SV Werder Bremen 49 (3)
2001–2003 Arminia Bielefeld 57 (5)
2003–2006 Hannover 96 78 (3)
2006–2013 VfL Bochum 192 (23)
2009VfL Bochum II 2 (0)
National team
1997–1999 Germany U-21 9 (1)
1998 Germany Olympic 4 (0)
1999–2004 Germany B 5 (0)
Teams managed
2013–2014 Hannover 96 II (assistant)
2014–2015 Hannover 96 U17
2015– Hannover 96 (assistant)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Christoph Dabrowski (né Krzysztof Dąbrowski; born 1 August 1978) is a German football manager and former footballer.[1][2] He played for Werder Bremen, Arminia Bielefeld, Hannover 96 and VfL Bochum.[1][3]

He is currently the assistant manager of Hannover 96.

Club career[edit]

On 11 May 1999, Dabrowski scored the decisive goal in Werder Bremen's 1–0 win against Schalke 04 and greatly contributed to the club's Bundesliga survival, it was also the first match with manager Thomas Schaaf in charge of the team.[4]

International career[edit]

Of Polish descent, Dabrowski owns dual German-Polish citizenship and in October 2005 the Polish Football Association requested to nominate Dabrowski for their national team. However, the FIFA rejected the request because Dabrowski was not entitled to play for Poland, as he had already played for the German Team 2006.[5]

Career statistics[edit]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB-Ligapokal Europe Total
1996–97 Bremen II Regionalliga Nord 16 0 16 0
1997–98 23 2 0 0 23 2
1998–99 9 0 1 0 10 0
1999–00 0 0 0 0 0 0
2000–01 3 0 0 0 3 0
1998–99 Bremen Bundesliga 15 1 2 0 17 1
1999–00 28 2 4 1 1 0 6 1 39 4
2000–01 6 0 0 0 0 0 6 0
2001–02 Bielefeld 2. Bundesliga 30 4 2 0 32 4
2002–03 Bundesliga 27 1 1 0 28 1
2003–04 Hannover 27 0 2 0 29 0
2004–05 19 0 3 0 22 0
2005–06 32 3 2 0 34 3
2006–07 Bochum 31 3 3 0 34 3
2007–08 28 5 2 0 30 5
2008–09 31 6 1 0 32 6
2009–10 29 1 2 0 31 1
2010–11 2. Bundesliga 29 4 1 0 30 4
2011–12 30 2 3 1 33 3
2012–13 14 2 2 0 16 2
2009–10 Bochum II Regionalliga West 2 0 2 0
Total Germany 429 36 31 2 1 0 6 1 467 39
Career total 429 36 31 2 1 0 6 1 467 39

Managerial career[edit]

On 10 October 2013, Dabrowski was named as the new assistant manager of Hannover 96's reserve team, Hannover 96 II,[6] he left this position on 28 January 2014, and was now picked as the new manager of the U17 team of Hannover 96.[7]

Personal life[edit]

Dabrowski was born in Katowice and emigrated in the age of six years with his mother as an ethnic German (Aussiedler) — his maternal grandfather had served in the German Wehrmacht and therefore got an Aussiedler status[8] — from his country of birth and settled in West-Berlin.

On 11 June 2015, Dabrowski was named as the new assistant coach of Hannover 96 under chef-manager Michael Frontzeck.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mein VfL Saison 2006/2007 Heft 1" (PDF). Portrail: Christoph Dabrowski (pages 11–14) (in German). VfL Bochum. 20 August 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 November 2010. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  2. ^ "Christoph Dabrowski" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 19 February 2010.
  3. ^ "Dabrowski, Christoph" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 19 February 2010.
  4. ^ Sander, Carsten (2 May 2016). "Die Helden von 1999 erinnern sich". Kreiszeitung Syke (in German). Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Die deutschen Gegner: Polen" [The German opponents: Poland] (in German). German Football Association. 2006. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  6. ^ "Dabro steigt bei den Roten ein" (in German). bild.de. Retrieved 11 October 2013.
  7. ^ "Dabrowski wird Trainer der U17" (in German). hannover96.de. Retrieved 28 January 2014.[permanent dead link]
  8. ^ "Noch hat Polen nicht gewonnen". Der Tagesspiegel (in German). Verlag Der Tagesspiegel GmbH. 13 November 2005. Retrieved 6 November 2014.
  9. ^ "Christoph Dabrowski neuer Co-Trainer" (in German). hannover96.de. Retrieved 11 June 2015.[permanent dead link]

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Marcel Maltritz
VfL Bochum captain
July 2010 − June 2012
Succeeded by
Andreas Luthe