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Cold Ashby

Cold Ashby is a village and civil parish in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England. At the time of the 2001 census, the parish's population was 255 people, increasing to 278 at the 2011 census. Cold Ashby is surrounded by rolling farmland, has a notable golf club, its population is commuters and their families, although farming is important to the local economy. The village has its own bowls and cricket clubs, is within the catchment area of the Guilsborough schools. Lying on the 200 metres contour line Cold Ashby is said to be the highest village in Northamptonshire; the British Ordnance Survey's first trig point, the triangular post used by surveyors, was erected on 18 April 1936 near Cold Ashby. More than 11,000 of the posts were erected across Britain to enable surveyors to create maps accurate to within metres by measuring angles and using trigonometry to calculate distances between the pillars; the Official Website of the Parish of Cold Ashby Illustrated details Illustrated details of the parish church Map sources for Cold Ashby Cold Ashby's Independent Website

CBB O2

The CBB O2 is a family of French ultralight trikes, designed by Bruno Bouron and produced by CBB ULM of Montreuil-Bellay. The aircraft is supplied ready to fly; the O2 was designed to comply with the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale microlight category, including the category's maximum gross weight of 450 kg. The aircraft has a maximum gross weight of 450 kg; the aircraft design features a cable-braced hang glider-style high wing supported by a curved mount, weight-shift controls, a two-seats-in-tandem open cockpit with a small cockpit fairing, tricycle landing gear with wheel pants and a single engine in pusher configuration. The aircraft is made from bolted-together aluminum tubing, with its double-surface wing covered in Dacron sailcloth, its 9.38 m span wing is supported by a single tube-type kingpost and uses an "A" frame weight-shift control bar. The powerplant is a twin-cylinder, liquid-cooled, two-stroke, dual-ignition 64 hp Rotax 582 engine or a four-cylinder, air- and liquid-cooled, four-stroke, dual-ignition 80 hp Rotax 912UL engine.

At one time the twin-cylinder, air-cooled, four-stroke, dual-ignition 60 hp HKS 700E engine was offered, but its use on the O2 had been discontinued by 2015. By 2018 the HKS powerplant had returned as an option. In its O2 SW 582 version, the aircraft has an empty weight of 172 kg and a gross weight of 450 kg, giving a useful load of 278 kg. With full fuel of 52 litres, the payload is 241 kg. An improved model of the basic O2 carriage is the O2B. A number of different wings can be fitted to the basic carriage, including the standard La Mouette Oryx. O2 582 Oryx 14 Model powered by a twin cylinder, liquid-cooled, two-stroke, dual-ignition 64 hp Rotax 582 engine and equipped with a La Mouette Oryx wing. O2 SW 582 Economical model powered by a twin-cylinder, liquid-cooled, two-stroke, dual-ignition 64 hp Rotax 582 engine. O2 SW 912 Model powered by a four-cylinder and liquid-cooled, four-stroke, dual-ignition 80 hp Rotax 912UL engine and equipped with a La Mouette Oryx wing. O2B HKS Light Model powered by a twin-cylinder, air-cooled, four-stroke, dual-ignition 60 hp HKS 700E engine and equipped with a La Mouette wing.

O2B HKS SW Model with options as standard for cross-country flying, powered by a twin-cylinder, air-cooled, four-stroke, dual-ignition 60 hp HKS 700E engine and equipped with a La Mouette wing. O2B 582 Model powered by a twin-cylinder, liquid-cooled, two-stroke, dual-ignition 64 hp Rotax 582 engine. O2B 912 Model powered by a four-cylinder, air- and liquid-cooled, four-stroke, dual-ignition 80 hp Rotax 912UL engine. Data from TackeGeneral characteristics Crew: one Capacity: one passenger Wingspan: 9.38 m Wing area: 12.9 m2 Empty weight: 172 kg Gross weight: 450 kg Fuel capacity: 52 litres Powerplant: 1 × Rotax 582 twin cylinder, liquid-cooled, two stroke aircraft engine, 48 kW Propellers: 4-bladed fixed pitchPerformance Maximum speed: 135 km/h Cruise speed: 90 km/h Rate of climb: 5.4 m/s Wing loading: 34.9 kg/m2 Official website

2014 Mae Lao earthquake

The 2014 Mae Lao earthquake occurred at 18:08:43 Indochina Time on May 5. The epicenter was located at a point 9 km south of Mae Lao District, 27 km southwest of Chiang Rai, Thailand. One person was killed as a result; the earthquake was a recorded as having a maximum intensity of strong, shaking both northern Thailand and Myanmar in the evening. People in many northern provinces sensed the quake. Windows and roads as well as temples all suffered damage from the quake. No casualties were reported, but there were news reports of one death and several injuries, it was the strongest earthquake recorded in Thailand according to National Disaster Warning Center Director Somsak Khaosuwan. Chiang Rai International Airport, located near the epicenter evacuated people from its terminal. Airport general manager Damrong Klongakara said the runway and flights had not been affected by the quake. So, the airport was closed for a while. In Phan district of Chiang Rai, a road was split by serious cracks. A Buddha statue's head at the Udomwaree Temple fell off due to the quake and a residential building of the temple suffered exterior cracks and ceiling damage.

Several other temples were damaged. A Chiang Rai police officer reported that goods in shops were scattered, cracks appeared in buildings, some provincial roads proved to have "large cracks". In Bangkok, tall buildings swayed as the earthquake occurred. Tremors were felt as far away as in Myanmar. One hundred repeated aftershocks were reported by the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center. List of earthquakes in 2014 Likelihood of earthquakes in Thailand The International Seismological Centre has a bibliography and/or authoritative data for this event

Shefford Town & Campton F.C.

Shefford Town & Campton Football Club is an English football club based in the town of Shefford, Bedfordshire. The team plays its home matches at Shefford Sports Club on Hitchin Road in Shefford and at Campton Playing Fields, Rectory Road in Campton; the club is competing at the 10th tier of the English football league system in the Spartan South Midlands Football League Division One. The club has a reserve side competing in Division 1 of the Bedfordshire County Football League and an A team competing in Division 3 of the same competition. Formed in 1910 as Shefford Town, their first successful period came in the 1950s: starting in 1949–50, the team won two South Midlands League championships and three Beds Senior Cups within five seasons. Subsequently, the club finished as runners-up in the Parthenon League, won the United Counties League title in 1960–61. Shefford would not match these achievements until the early 1980s, when the club was promoted from the South Midlands League's second tier in 1982–83 and won the league title a year later.

After relegation in 1990, Shefford Town folded in 1994. The town remained without a senior football team until 2009. In 2010 Shefford Town merged with near neighbours Campton; the club has had success both on and off the pitch in recent years since its reformation, the club were crowned Bedfordshire County Premier Division Winners in 2011–12, 2017–18 and 2018–19. The Bedfordshire County League Britannia Cup was won in both 2011 & 2014 and the East Beds Charity Cup was won by the Reserve team in 2015; the Club has finished runners up in the Biggleswade knock-out cup in 2015, 2016 & 2017. At the end of 2018–19 season Shefford announced its intentions to seek promotion into the Spartan South Midlands Football League, they duly wrapped up the Bedfordshire County League title and passed the relevant ground grading, so the club is all set to step back into the league it folded out of back in 1994; the club is affiliated to the Bedfordshire County Football Association. Founded in 1910, the club played its first football in September when it began to enter a team into the Biggleswade and District Junior League.

Playing home matches at Ivel Road, the team contested this local competition until 1949–50, when Shefford began to enter its team into the South Midlands League. The side won the Beds Senior Cup that season, a feat it repeated in 1953. After finishing runners-up in the Beds Senior Cup the following year, winning it again in 1955 and capping these feats with two successive league championships, Shefford Town started to contest the Parthenon League against teams from further afield – some away trips took the team as far as London. In the new league, Shefford finished as runners-up in the first season before spending two more years in the competition. After three years, the long journeys and sparse league programme led the club to join the more local United Counties League. In 1960–61, the league championship came to Shefford, the club added the North Beds Charity Cup to its trophy cabinet during the same week; the following season saw a drastic change in fortunes, as the team finished second from bottom – the club reacted by arranging a move back to the South Midlands League.

The team came third during the first season back in the division, in 1973–74 the team finished as runners-up. However, the club was relegated in 1975–76. Success didn't come back to Ivel Road until the early 1980s – in 1982–83 Shefford lifted the Division One title, finished the following season as league champions. During 1983–84, Shefford won the North Beds Charity Cup, the Biggleswade Knockout contest and the Bedfordshire Intermediate Cup; the North Beds Charity and Biggleswade Knockout double was repeated the following year. During the late 1980s the club stagnated, as the team tumbled back into Division One after finishing bottom in 1989–90. After three uneventful seasons, Shefford Town were moved to the Senior Division on league re-organisation. Though performances improved, with the team finishing fifth in 1993–94, the club was wound up and played its final match on 18 May 1994. Shefford Town Football Club was reformed in 2009 by Dan Pinkerton and Graham Earl, involved in local youth football.

The new club was accepted into the Bedfordshire County Football League for the 2009–10 season, assigned a place in Division Two, at level 13 of the English football league system. The club has had success both on and off the pitch in recent years since its reformation, the club were crowned Bedfordshire County Premier Division Winners in 2011–12, 2017–18 and 2018–19; the Bedfordshire County League Britannia Cup was won in both 2011 & 2014 and the East Beds Charity Cup was won by the Reserve team in 2015. The Club has finished runners up in the Biggleswade knock-out cup in 2015, 2016 & 2017. At the end of 2018/19 season Shefford announced its intentions to seek promotion into the Spartan South Midlands Football League, they duly wrapped up the Bedfordshire County League title and passed the relevant ground grading, so the club is all set to step back into the league it folded out of back in 1994. Shefford Town & Campton FC play fixtures at 2 local grounds, Rectory Road in Campton has been the club's home since the 1920s and is still used by the club today, a typical village playing field with purpose-built Step 7 changing facilities, what is remarkable is that these facilities were brought into the 21st century through the hard work of the club's players and management to ensure they could continue to play out of the club's spiritual home.

For the 2014/15 season, the club moved into its new home at Shefford Sports Club on Hitchin Road in Shefford. The new ground boasts changing facilities and a well looked after pitch. In the spring of 2019 the club added a new s

French frigate Pomone (1805)

Pomone was a 40-gun Hortense-class frigate of the French Navy, built at Genoa for the puppet government of the Ligurian Republic, annexed as part of France in June 1805, a month after Pomone was completed. On 30 January 1807, she collided with the French frigate Muiron. In May 1807, Annibal and the corvette Victorieuse engaged HMS Spartan off Cabrera in the Mediterranean. Pomone was captured near Corfu during the Action of 29 November 1811 and added to the Royal Navy as HMS Ambuscade, although she was never brought into service, she was broken up for material in November 1812 at Woolwich Dockyard. HMS Ambuscade website

RAF Croft

Royal Air Force Croft or RAF Croft is a former Royal Air Force station located 4.6 miles south of Darlington, County Durham, England and 8 miles north east of Richmond, North Yorkshire. The site is known locally as Croft Aerodrome or Neasham; the airfield was opened in 1941 for use by the Royal Air Force but by 1942 the aerodrome had been taken over by the Royal Canadian Air Force for training as part of No. 6 Group RCAF. The station is now more famously known as the site of Croft Circuit, a motor racing circuit which hosts various car championships including the British Touring Car Championship; the first squadron to join the airfield was No. 78 Squadron RAF which arrived on 20 October 1941 flying both the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Mk. V and the Handley Page Halifax Mk. II before leaving on 10 June 1942 when no units were stationed during the summer but on 1 October 1942 No. 419 Squadron RCAF has arrived with their Mk. III Vickers Wellingtons before re-equipping with the Halifax II and leaving on 10 November 1942.

During this time on 7 November 1942 427 Squadron RCAF was formed at the airfield with a mixture of Mk III's and Mk X's Wellington before leaving on 4 May 1943. In 1943, Croft became a sub-station of RAF Middleton St. George, allocated to No. 6 Group, Royal Canadian Air Force. The airfield hosted No 1664 Heavy Conversion Unit RAF starting from 10 May 1943 which trained new pilots to fly the new heavy bombers using the Mk II and the Mk IV Halifax before leaving on 7 December 1943; when three days on the tenth 431 Squadron RCAF began using the airfield with the Halifax Mks V and III and the Avro Lancaster Mk. X before leaving on 7 June 1945 going to Canada; this squadron was joined by 434 Squadron RCAF which had joined on 11 December 1944 flying the Halifax and the Lancaster before leaving on 15 June 1945 to go to Canada. After the RCAF left in 1945, Croft saw little wartime activity. In 1945 the aerodrome became a satellite of No. 13 Operational Training Unit RAF based at Middleton St. George flying de Havilland Mosquitoes.

The station was closed in the summer of 1946. On 22 March 1945, a Royal Canadian Air Force Lancaster aircraft was taking off from Croft when it was caught in a crosswind and blown off the runway where a punctured tyre led to it crashing and the port engine catching fire; the crew extricated themselves and as the 4-pound incendiary bombs were exploding in the fire, the base and local residents were evacuated to shelter in a cutting of the nearby railway line. At 11:27 am, the 4,000-pound blockbuster bomb on board the Lancaster exploded and took the roofs off of several buildings in the immediate vicinity; the Croft aerodrome is now better known as a Croft Circuit, a regular venue for the British Touring Car Championship and British Superbike Championship. It is located near the North Yorkshire villages of Dalton Dalton-on-Tees. List of former Royal Air Force stations RAF Croft on RafWeb