Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command (Royal Navy)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Office of the Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command
Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Ensign of the Royal Navy
Ministry of Defence
Member of Admiralty Board, Navy Board, Navy Command
Reports to First Sea Lord
Nominator Secretary of State for Defence
Appointer Prime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the Queen-in-Council
Term length Not fixed (typically 1–4 years)
Inaugural holder Admiral Sir John Frewen
Formation 1969–2012
Naval Home Command
Active 1969–2012
Country  United Kingdom
Branch  Royal Navy
Type Fleet
Garrison/HQ Dockyard Commissioner's house, Portsmouth

The Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command, (CINCNAVHOME)[1] was a senior Royal Navy post that existed from 1969 to 2012. Naval Home Command was a name given to the military formation, establishments, and staff administered under the post.

History[edit]

Prior to the formation of this command the Royal Navy has usually been split into several commands, each with its own Commander-in-Chief. In July 1969 the office was created following further downsizing of naval commands within the Royal Navy. This resulted in the offices of the Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth and Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth being combined to create single new post of Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command (CINCNAVHOME). In 1994 the post of Commander-in-Chief Naval Home Command was unified with that of the Second Sea Lord following the rationalisation of the British Armed Forces following the end of the Cold War. In 2012, separate existing senior commands were discontinued, with full operational command being vested instead in the First Sea Lord.

Responsibilities[edit]

The Commander-in-Chief was responsible for maintaining operational capability by providing correctly trained manpower to the fleet, the office existed from 1969 to 2012.[2]

Commanders-in-Chief, Naval Home Command[edit]

Included:[3]

Second Sea Lord and Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command

In 2012 the appointment of separate Commanders-in-Chief was discontinued with full operational command being transferred to the First Sea Lord.

Chiefs of Staff, Naval Home Command[edit]

Included:[4]

Offices under the Commander-in-Chief[edit]

Included:[5][6][7][8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eberle, Sir James (2007). Wider horizons: naval policy & international affairs. Durham, England: Roundtuit Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 9781904499176. 
  2. ^ Heyman, Charles (2006). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2007–2008. Oxford, England: Casemate Publishers. p. 62. ISBN 9781844154890. 
  3. ^ Mackie, Colin. "Royal Navy Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Colin Mackie, pp.68–70, December 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  4. ^ Mackie, Colin. "Royal Navy Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Colin Mackie, pp.68–70, December 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  5. ^ Owen, Charles (2015). No More Heroes: The Royal Navy in the Twentieth Century: Anatomy of a Legend. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 9781317387596. 
  6. ^ Turner, B. (2017). The Statesman's Yearbook 2007: The Politics, Cultures and Economies of the World. Springer. p. 1273. ISBN 9780230271357. 
  7. ^ Murray, Douglas J.; Viotti, Paul R. (1994). The Defense Policies of Nations: A Comparative Study. JHU Press. p. 300. ISBN 9780801847943. 
  8. ^ Coakes, Elayne; Willis, Dianne; Clarke, Steve (2001). Knowledge Management in the SocioTechnical World: The Graffiti Continues. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 139. ISBN 9781852334413. 
  9. ^ "DEFENCE (NAVY) ESTIMATES, 1969–70, VOTE A (Hansard, 10 March 1969)". hansard.millbanksystems.com. Hansard , HC Deb 10 March 1969 vol 779 cc991-1120. Retrieved 30 December 2017. 

Sources[edit]

  • Eberle, Sir James (2007). Wider horizons: naval policy & international affairs. Durham, England: Roundtuit Publishing. ISBN 9781904499176.
  • Heyman, Charles (2006). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2007–2008. Oxford, England: Casemate Publishers. ISBN 9781844154890.
  • Mackie, Colin (2017). "British Armed Forces: Royal Navy Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Scotland, UK.